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Cake Pans
Posted: 23 October 2011 01:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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What cake did you make?
Yes, other than the sides, the cakes was perfectly baked [on the third try]. However when I just used Pam, I had a lovely clean crust.

And yes, since we don’t have the flour&grease; spray in here, I guess something is off with my manual method.
It is either that or that flouring manually is not the same thing as the spray, in which case, just greasing the pan is a better method.

BTW, last time I baked a caked in a kinda loaf pan, it’s more a triangular pan- I floured and it was perfect. I never floured a pan until Rose. Did you ever use Baker’s Joy?

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Posted: 23 October 2011 02:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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McBrownie - 23 October 2011 04:17 AM

What cake did you make?
Yes, other than the sides, the cakes was perfectly baked [on the third try]. However when I just used Pam, I had a lovely clean crust.

And yes, since we don’t have the flour&grease; spray in here, I guess something is off with my manual method.
It is either that or that flouring manually is not the same thing as the spray, in which case, just greasing the pan is a better method.

BTW, last time I baked a caked in a kinda loaf pan, it’s more a triangular pan- I floured and it was perfect. I never floured a pan until Rose. Did you ever use Baker’s Joy?

I baked a pumpkin cake from a library book I borrowed titled Fundamental Techniques of Classic Pastry Art from The French Culinary Institute.  I attached pictures below. The sides were not sealed, as you described. It is the layer cake.

Your post made me go back into my photo album and check the sides of my previous cakes.  I have never used the 8 inch round Magic Line pan but I have an 8, 9 and 10 inch in their false bottom pans, which I use in place of a springform pan. I’ve always loved the way the cakes bake in them but I never really looked at the sides. I also attached pictures of 2 other cakes I baked in the Magic line loose bottom pans. One is Rose’s recipe variation for the Cinnamon Apple Surprise (I used peaches and drizzled vanilla glaze on top of the streusel) and the other is Flo Braker’s Rhubarb cake.

In Rose’s recipe, the sides look perfect to me. If there is anything I can always rely on, it’s a recipe from Rose.

In Flo Braker’s rhubarb-almond cake, you can see the sides did not seal.

The loaf is Rose’s recipe from The Bread Bible. It is a cinnamon-apple-streusel tea cake. The sides are perfect, IMO, as they always are in the Magic Line 9x5 loaf pan.

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Posted: 23 October 2011 03:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Sorry, I didn’t see your last question. I rarely use Baker’s Joy. I use it more to grease the cooling rack than on baking pans. I always use Spectrum Organic shortening and have never had a sticking issue until the layer cake I baked the other day, using the recipe from the French Culinary Institute.

I always use parchment on the bottom and then flour the entire pan, unless it is an upside down cake, and then I don’t use parchment.

Have you ever considered William Sonoma’s Goldtouch pans?

In RHC, Rose recommends Chicago Metallic Professional cake pans. Recently, those pans have been replaced with a different coating which I am hesitant to use. 

I bought a WS Goldtouch loaf pan which I like a lot.

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Posted: 23 October 2011 03:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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[Wow, the cakes look gorgeous!]

It’s really weird.
If I’m just gonna compare my experiences, then when I baked the white velvet in a greased and floured pan, the sides were a little raggedy.
But when I baked the leftover batter in a greased RAMEKIN [=the comparison is not completely accurate since the baking instrument/pan is different] the sides were almost perfect.
Edit: The picture on the left is the greased & floured Magic Line, the one on the right is the greased ramekin.

I guess to be completely sure in an experimental way, I’ll have to bake a white velvet cake in a greased Magic-Line pan [and you’ll have to bake in 8 inch round pan], and we’ll need to see the results.

By the way, when I made Rose’s banana cake [the butter one, without the oil] I did grease and flour, and I’ve baked it in a non-stick 4” springform pan and the sides were sealed.

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Posted: 23 October 2011 03:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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McBrownie - 23 October 2011 06:23 AM

[Wow, the cakes look gorgeous!]

It’s really weird.
If I’m just gonna compare my experiences, then when I baked the white velvet in a greased and floured pan, the sides were a little raggedy.
But when I baked the leftover batter in a greased RAMEKIN [=the comparison is not completely accurate since the baking instrument/pan is different] the sides were almost perfect.
Edit: The picture on the left is the greased & floured Magic Line, the one on the right is the greased ramekin.

I guess to be completely sure in an experimental way, I’ll have to bake a white velvet cake in a greased Magic-Line pan [and you’ll have to bake in 8 inch round pan], and we’ll need to see the results.

By the way, when I made Rose’s banana cake [the butter one, without the oil] I did grease and flour, and I’ve baked it in a non-stick 4” springform pan and the sides were sealed.

Thank you! I think your cakes are gorgeous too. They are so high!!! Personally, I don’t see where either cake is unsealed. They look great to me.

I recently baked the White Velvet in a Wilton heart pan but I frosted it so I cannot look back and see how the sides were. I do bake the Cordon Rose banana cake a lot but I use the Chicago Metallic pan, which is non-stick and it always looked perfect to me.

I did some research tonight and learned a lot of people like the WS Goldtouch for cakes because of the finish they get. 

However, most authors strongly recommend plain aluminum pans for baking

Now I’m more confused than ever because I love the way your cake came out using the Magic Line confused

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Posted: 23 October 2011 04:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Haha! Thanks!
They look high because it is a macro lens.  The right picture is baked in a small ramekin! like a small souffle cup. That one does have a sealed crust, but the left one doesn’t. you can see all those holes on the sides that don’t appear on the right one [except for the thingy on the lower-left side].

Someone in the forum also told me about the WS Goldtouch pans, but I am getting more and more confused just like you!

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Posted: 23 October 2011 11:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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In my un-professional opinion, I don’t see that much difference between your cakes. I think they both have a nice finish and look really moist and nicely browned.

I think I might buy the WS in one size and compare it to my Magic Line.

When I do, I will post pictures.

Perhaps having a set of the WS and the Magic Line is a good investment for serious bakers on the occasion when you don’t frost the cake ??

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Posted: 23 October 2011 11:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Maybe I should have taken pictures of the pans (:

They are nicely brown and bake overall really well except for the sides..

Flour Girl - 23 October 2011 02:46 PM

Perhaps having a set of the WS and the Magic Line is a good investment for serious bakers on the occasion when you don’t frost the cake ??

I think so too! Though I don’t know when I’ll get the WS pans. Maybe when there’s a sale wink

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Posted: 23 October 2011 12:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Do they have sales? Cool!

We are going to WS today.

I’m buying only one pan, an 8 x 2 inch. I only have one 8 inch now so I need 2 anyway. When I baked that layer cake I had to use an 8 x 2 and an 8 x 1 1/2. I cut one of the layers to try to even the difference.

If I like it, I’ll wait for a sale to buy more too.

The WS pan is $10 more than the Magic Line and it is something that will last a life time.

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Posted: 23 October 2011 01:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Flour Girl - 23 October 2011 06:32 AM

However, most authors strongly recommend plain aluminum pans for baking

This is typically because the non-stick pans are dark and a dark pan will produce a darker crust, all things being equal.  But some people prefer a darker crust.  Cooks Illustrated favorite cake pan is one of cheapies from the supermarket that has a dark, non-stick coating.

If you wanted a similar effect from the Magic Line, you could spray paint the outside with a high temp gray paint.

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Posted: 23 October 2011 02:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Charles, I don’t really like a darker crust. My 9 inch round is the Chicago Metallic Professional pan. They bake a beautiful sealed finish but a little on the dark side. Also, they are baked by the minimum time suggested in the recipe. There is nothing wrong with the pan other than it is hard to clean because it develops a white stain mark from the shortening. Magic Line pans clean to a gleaming shine with no effort at all.

On the other hand, the WS loaf pan I recently purchased baked a golden cake which was the exact color of the loaf I baked (at the same time) using the silver USA pan. I baked a carrot-rum raisin loaf I adapted from a muffin recipe (that’s why I didn’t take pictures red face ) My husband and I both thought the WS baked more evenly than the USA pan (which has that Americoat lining) as the corners on one side were much darker on the USA pan’s loaf.

Do you know why I would have the issue of the crumbs sticking to the round Magic Line pan and not to the 9 x 5 Magic Line loaf pan? Both were prepared in the same way, shortening, parchment and flour.

As you can see in this picture, the sides of the cake are messed up.  I baked this in the Magic Line 10 x 3 inch loose bottom pan.  But, although the sides were messed, the cake was perfectly baked, very moist and not dry at all.

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Posted: 23 October 2011 04:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Flour Girl - 23 October 2011 05:46 PM

Do you know why I would have the issue of the crumbs sticking to the round Magic Line pan and not to the 9 x 5 Magic Line loaf pan? Both were prepared in the same way, shortening, parchment and flour.

Not really.  Assuming the pan preparation results were exactly the same, perhaps it has more to do with the recipe.  I would think that the stronger the gluten, the less likely it is for parts of the product to peel away.  And I’ve often wondered whether some batters tended to absorb the oil, rather than allowing it to cling to the sides of the pan.

If you wanted to get really OCD about it, you could line the sides with parchment, too.  I do this for cheesecake and it greatly improves the results on the sides.

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Posted: 23 October 2011 08:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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I think you hit it right on the head!

This recipe is beaten in a way as to prevent gluten development as much as possible. After creaming, the bowl is removed from the beater and the flour is incorporated with a wooden spoon, as specified in the recipe.

Thank you for the tip about parchment on the sides.  I’ll remember that.

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Posted: 24 October 2011 01:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Flour Girl - 23 October 2011 03:13 PM

Do they have sales? Cool!

We are going to WS today.

I’m buying only one pan, an 8 x 2 inch. I only have one 8 inch now so I need 2 anyway. When I baked that layer cake I had to use an 8 x 2 and an 8 x 1 1/2. I cut one of the layers to try to even the difference.

If I like it, I’ll wait for a sale to buy more too.

The WS pan is $10 more than the Magic Line and it is something that will last a life time.

That’s a good idea.
I’m really interested in the golden aspect- is it just a gimmick or does the golden color has any effect on the baked good?
Many people praise them.

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Posted: 24 October 2011 12:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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The WS pan is $10 more than the Magic Line and it is something that will last a life time.

It’s very unlikely that the WS pan will last a lifetime, unless you’re 90 now.  wink Non-stick coatings do wear away.  Based on what my pans look like, I’d bet that if you used them weekly, the coatings wouldn’t last more than a couple of years.

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