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Cake Pans
Posted: 24 October 2011 12:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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CharlesT - 24 October 2011 03:14 PM

The WS pan is $10 more than the Magic Line and it is something that will last a life time.

It’s very unlikely that the WS pan will last a lifetime, unless you’re 90 now.  wink

LOL

Based on what my pans look like, I?d bet that if you used them weekly, the coatings wouldn?t last more than a couple of years.

We went to WS yesterday and I bought 1 of the 8 inch pans.

I have a few French recipes which call for using three 8 inch pans anyway.

I do think you are right about the gluten in the batter.  Next time I bake that pumpkin cake recipe, I’ll use a pan of each type for the recipe.

Also, I have some savory recipes like Robuchon’s potato-bacon-greuyere cake which requires a non-stick cake pan. The recipe calls for 9 inch but it would be easy to convert to an 8 inch pan. So, the WS pan will be put to use but I will keep the Magic Line pans too.

I really appreciate your help, very much

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Posted: 26 October 2011 03:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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McBrownie, I just want to say I feel CharlesT is right about the Parrish Magic Line pans. This morning I baked the same pumpkin cake recipe which initially stuck to the parchment. Below is a picture of the layers as they are cooling.  They came out of the pan with, what I consider, perfect sides.

So, now I am heading back to WS to return the pan I bought on the weekend.

I hope you find a pan you like.

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Posted: 26 October 2011 06:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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They ARE perfect!
wait, what did you do differently?

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Posted: 26 October 2011 06:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Thank you!!  Last time, I did not have the right size pans. I had one 8 x 2 and one 8 x 1.5.  This time I used two 8 x 2 and weighed them to make sure each of the pans held the same weight of batter.  My big mistake, though, was forgetting to use Rose’s cake strips. I had to even the tops.

I’m not even going to try the WS Gold Touch round pan.

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Posted: 27 October 2011 08:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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I would like to add something to this convo! I have experimented a lot with getting cakes with level tops by using different brands of cake strips, mainly wilton versus Rose’s method, before I started using Rose’s recipes exclusively. I learned through trial and error, when I use baking strips or silicone strips for level baking, I get an edge that isn’t sealed, slightly crumbly with a weird soft layer that peels off easily. It’s always useable though and looks exactly identical to the edges in all your photos. When I take the strips off, the top is round but the edges are sealed due to the heat searing the crust into a crust! It’s like the difference between a pizza crust made on a wood fired ceramic stove and making the same pizza on an oven rack with an aluminum cookie sheet. Not the same result due to heat concentration/surface.

We see this exact example in Flour Girl’s pumpkin cake, above, where she forgot the strips. This has always meant the difference between sealed sides or soft sides for me. A solution I have employed in the past is taking off the strips very very carefully in the last 15 minutes of baking once the majority of the center has set if I really must have a sealed edge. If I am covering it, I just crumb coat with a thin icing to seal it and carry on. I know you all have done a ton of debating and comparing and experimenting about this phenomenon and it’s occurrence with certain pans. I think your experiments are amazing! I just think this problem is caused by the strips and not the pans so much.

Look at the experiment with the ramekin and the small cake pan. The ramekin didn’t have a cake strip on it, I bet! Also, they get much hotter than an aluminum or metal pan, hence why we cut baking times or temperatures when we use those with cake batter. The cake pan and loaf pan experiment shows the same thing. I bet you didn’t use cake strips on the loaf pan! Once again, I am not trying to burst anyone’s bubble or say your observations aren’t totally awesome (because they are!!) but I have seen this enough times, I can’t help but see this correlation.

What do you think?

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Posted: 27 October 2011 10:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Makes perfect sense to me, it’s very much like savory food that sticks to a saute pan until it is well-browned, at which point it will release.  I suppose you could try to get the best of both worlds by trying to use a thin strip that only provides a small amount of insulation, but it may be that one has to choose between flat tops and picture-perfect sides.

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Posted: 27 October 2011 10:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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FG—Thanks for all the experimentation!  Your cake truly turned out perfect!
Jemoiselle—These are awesome observations!!!  I am going to look for this phenomena next time I bake!

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Posted: 27 October 2011 11:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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Jemoiselle, thank you! I have got to remember that next time. It does make perfect sense. Thank you for the excellent tip!

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Posted: 27 October 2011 02:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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Most welcome! I am glad you were able to understand my garble enough to make something coherent out of it LOL. I just couldn’t resist! One thing I will mention too, to Rose’s credit, is that her strips don’t insulate as much as the wilton ones, which seems to be the best combination for me. It’s a perfect compromise! When her circles don’t fit, I use a cut up silicone baking mat and pin it with wilton’s pins :D

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Posted: 27 October 2011 10:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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Jemoiselle - 27 October 2011 11:13 AM

forgot the strips. This has always meant the difference between sealed sides or soft sides for me.

Can we draw a distinction between a soft side and one that sticks to the pan?  I haven’t noticed that they’re mutually exclusive.

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Posted: 28 October 2011 02:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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Anne in NC - 27 October 2011 01:51 PM

FG—Thanks for all the experimentation!  Your cake truly turned out perfect!
Jemoiselle—These are awesome observations!!!  I am going to look for this phenomena next time I bake!

Thank you Anne. Below is a picture of the finished cake. Next time, I will triple the frosting recipe because this time I doubled it and there wasn’t enough to frost the inside layer sufficiently, the way you do.

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Posted: 28 October 2011 03:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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CharlesT - 28 October 2011 01:00 AM
Jemoiselle - 27 October 2011 11:13 AM

forgot the strips. This has always meant the difference between sealed sides or soft sides for me.

Can we draw a distinction between a soft side and one that sticks to the pan?  I haven’t noticed that they’re mutually exclusive.

Sure smile I wouldn’t say it stuck, although there were crumbs on the pan due to the nature of the texture (soft). I would say the sides just didn’t cook any faster than the rest of the cake, therefore they have the same texture as the crumb. At least, for me that is what happens!

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Posted: 28 October 2011 03:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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Flour Girl - 28 October 2011 05:30 AM
Anne in NC - 27 October 2011 01:51 PM

FG—Thanks for all the experimentation!  Your cake truly turned out perfect!
Jemoiselle—These are awesome observations!!!  I am going to look for this phenomena next time I bake!

Thank you Anne. Below is a picture of the finished cake. Next time, I will triple the frosting recipe because this time I doubled it and there wasn’t enough to frost the inside layer sufficiently, the way you do.

Flour Girl that cake looks sooooooooo yummy! smile I love that the sides aren’t frosted. It is charming!

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Posted: 28 October 2011 02:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Thank you!! I wanted to make the filling thicker. Next time

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Posted: 28 October 2011 02:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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It is gorgeous!!!

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