Are items missing from Kindle version?
Posted: 14 October 2011 05:00 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I was so delighted to find I could have Kindle on my computer.  Like right now I am away from my kitchen (where my hard copy of RHC and TCB live).  IT is so convenient for planning, calculating, grocery list making…..

But I do not see the chart that shows volumes….well it has wedding cake pan sizes I think.  Does this chart not include sheet cakes?

I need to figure out the volume of 1/4, 1/2 .....

Is this only in the Cake Bible?

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Posted: 14 October 2011 05:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Oh I see two sizes of pans, I guess I can guesstimate based on that.  ?  Duh

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Posted: 14 October 2011 05:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I’m thinking I don’t recall seeing sheet cakes (I’m away from my RHC/TCB, as well).  I don’t know if you can adapt to sheet cakes without experimentation—I’m thinking the shallow depth and large span could have surprises in store, but I’m fairly inexperienced in this realm, so it’s just a thought!!

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Posted: 14 October 2011 11:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thank you, Anne.  I am fairly inexperienced also.  I only currently have a 9 x 13 pan.  Someone inquired re: sheet cake pan.  Rose only mentions 2 sizes but a google search shows that 1/4 sheet is 9 x 13, 1/2 sheet is about 11 x 15 (I think) ... and full size 18 x 24.  I am pretty certain I do not want to do full size

I am due for some experimentation with this cake anyway.  I already know I can do it in 9 x 13…. the 11 x 15 is another story.  What will I do with all that cake?

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Posted: 15 October 2011 07:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Rose has a couple of recipes, not exactly for sheet cakes, but that use these jelly roll pans.  There’s the chocolate feather bed, where you bake very flattish layers and stack them, filled with light whipped ganache.  Then, of course, there’s any number of rolled cakes, which use a full sheet pan (which is, more or less, like a cookie sheet with sides).

I think they can also be used to make larger rectangular cakes—you can make flatter cakes and stack them filled with buttercream (or wahtever) rather than trying to torte a huge rectangle!

There are also recipes written for them as single layers—someone at my work often makes something called “The World’s Greatest Chocolate Cake,” and it’s baked in a half sheet pan as a single layer, frosted, and served out of the pan.  She brings it to neighborhood parties and work pot lucks and such.

Even though 9x13 was the cake pan size of choice when I was growing up—make famous by the box mix, I think—I’m think that Rose doesn’t have a lot of cakes for that size (if any).  I think thath 13” span can get complicated.  It’s possible two 9x2” layers will bake normally in one, but I can’t be sure.  I know that size is very useful for bars and such (the Baked guys use that size for that type of dessert—and they write really good recipes).

If you wanted to get a couple of extra pans without spending a lot of $$ or taking up a lot of room, and you want to make regular butter cakes (or even genoises, I think) I’d suggest either 9x2” pans (depending if you want to make one or two layers) or 8 x 2” pans.  A recipe for two 9x2 layers makes three 8x2” layers, so it depends on how tall you like your cakes.  One 9x2” layer is also very beautiful—Julie makes them often.

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Posted: 15 October 2011 07:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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half sheet pan is 12 x 18, or half the size of the full sheet pan smile  It is larger than a cookie sheet (11x15)

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Posted: 15 October 2011 04:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Anne in NC - 15 October 2011 10:03 AM

Rose has a couple of recipes, not exactly for sheet cakes, but that use these jelly roll pans.  There’s the chocolate feather bed, where you bake very flattish layers and stack them, filled with light whipped ganache.  Then, of course, there’s any number of rolled cakes, which use a full sheet pan (which is, more or less, like a cookie sheet with sides).

  I think I have a jelly roll pan.  I need to get the courage to make the featherbed

I think they can also be used to make larger rectangular cakes—you can make flatter cakes and stack them filled with buttercream (or wahtever) rather than trying to torte a huge rectangle!
   
      I will hold this idea if I need to make a layered rectangular cake. 

There are also recipes written for them as single layers—someone at my work often makes something called “The World’s Greatest Chocolate Cake,” and it’s baked in a half sheet pan as a single layer, frosted, and served out of the pan.  She brings it to neighborhood parties and work pot lucks and such.

Even though 9x13 was the cake pan size of choice when I was growing up—make famous by the box mix, I think—I’m think that Rose doesn’t have a lot of cakes for that size (if any).  I think thath 13” span can get complicated.  It’s possible two 9x2” layers will bake normally in one, but I can’t be sure.  I know that size is very useful for bars and such (the Baked guys use that size for that type of dessert—and they write really good recipes).

    Yes 9 x 2 is right for 9 x 13.  I have done this with a non-Rose recipe…

If you wanted to get a couple of extra pans without spending a lot of $$ or taking up a lot of room, and you want to make regular butter cakes (or even genoises, I think) I’d suggest either 9x2” pans (depending if you want to make one or two layers) or 8 x 2” pans.  A recipe for two 9x2 layers makes three 8x2” layers, so it depends on how tall you like your cakes.  One 9x2” layer is also very beautiful—Julie makes them often.


    I have numerous sizes of 2” round pans, 12, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, and 4.  (Thanks to this site, I believe I can whip out a 4” inch only batter!!!!  I have only one rectangular pan - 9 x 13 ......hmmmm the last time someone inquired re: sheet cake, I talked them into a 10” round and layered.  I do think that a round cake whether one layer or more, is more elegant. 

Congratulations (and thank you) on being Administrator….. I just noticed that.

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Posted: 15 October 2011 05:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Julie - 15 October 2011 10:35 AM

half sheet pan is 12 x 18, or half the size of the full sheet pan smile  It is larger than a cookie sheet (11x15)

Thank you Julie! Now you are a source I trust.

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Posted: 15 October 2011 05:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Anne in NC - 15 October 2011 10:03 AM

Rose has a couple of recipes, not exactly for sheet cakes, but that use these jelly roll pans.  There’s the chocolate feather bed, where you bake very flattish layers and stack them, filled with light whipped ganache.  Then, of course, there’s any number of rolled cakes, which use a full sheet pan (which is, more or less, like a cookie sheet with sides).

I think they can also be used to make larger rectangular cakes—you can make flatter cakes and stack them filled with buttercream (or wahtever) rather than trying to torte a huge rectangle!

There are also recipes written for them as single layers—someone at my work often makes something called “The World’s Greatest Chocolate Cake,” and it’s baked in a half sheet pan as a single layer, frosted, and served out of the pan.  She brings it to neighborhood parties and work pot lucks and such.

Even though 9x13 was the cake pan size of choice when I was growing up—make famous by the box mix, I think—I’m think that Rose doesn’t have a lot of cakes for that size (if any).  I think thath 13” span can get complicated.  It’s possible two 9x2” layers will bake normally in one, but I can’t be sure.  I know that size is very useful for bars and such (the Baked guys use that size for that type of dessert—and they write really good recipes).

If you wanted to get a couple of extra pans without spending a lot of $$ or taking up a lot of room, and you want to make regular butter cakes (or even genoises, I think) I’d suggest either 9x2” pans (depending if you want to make one or two layers) or 8 x 2” pans.  A recipe for two 9x2 layers makes three 8x2” layers, so it depends on how tall you like your cakes.  One 9x2” layer is also very beautiful—Julie makes them often.

  oh yes… I meant to ask (note) ?two 9 x 2 makes 3 8 x 2 ?  That must just be shorter layers….sounds like an idea worth trying.

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Posted: 17 February 2012 11:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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How do you like the e-version of the book? I’ve considered purchasing it, but I have a few other e-cookbooks and I don’t find they have translated over well. Is it easy to use and follow?

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Posted: 17 February 2012 12:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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brusselslady - 17 February 2012 03:21 PM

How do you like the e-version of the book? I’ve considered purchasing it, but I have a few other e-cookbooks and I don’t find they have translated over well. Is it easy to use and follow?

I love having the e-version of this book.  I do not have Kindle but I do have Kindle for PC and Kindle for Android.  I love if I at the grocer, I can check ingredients.  I also appreciate the eletronic search for a component, recipe, etc.  I have found nothing lacking between the hard copy and e-version.  It has all of the photos, etc.  I wish I had it sooner, my hard copy is beat up.  I wish I could have the Cake Bible in e-version. 

I have a third party camera guide in e-version and find that it is best viewed in the PC version (as opposed to Android).  If you have Kindle or Kindle for PC—you should enjoy it.  I love it.

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Posted: 20 February 2012 08:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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CRenee - 17 February 2012 04:06 PM
brusselslady - 17 February 2012 03:21 PM

How do you like the e-version of the book? I’ve considered purchasing it, but I have a few other e-cookbooks and I don’t find they have translated over well. Is it easy to use and follow?

I love having the e-version of this book.  I do not have Kindle but I do have Kindle for PC and Kindle for Android.  I love if I at the grocer, I can check ingredients.  I also appreciate the eletronic search for a component, recipe, etc.  I have found nothing lacking between the hard copy and e-version.  It has all of the photos, etc.  I wish I had it sooner, my hard copy is beat up.  I wish I could have the Cake Bible in e-version. 

I have a third party camera guide in e-version and find that it is best viewed in the PC version (as opposed to Android).  If you have Kindle or Kindle for PC—you should enjoy it.  I love it.

Thanks very much for the feedback, I think I will move it from my wish-list to my purchased list!

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