Frosting delema
Posted: 22 October 2011 12:03 AM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  5
Joined  2009-04-13

My nephew is getting married in early December, and I will be providing the cake as well as cupcakes, individual-size cheesecakes, and a hot cocoa bar. I will be traveling for 7 hours the night before the wedding with all of this. My question is regarding the cupcakes. They have found a site with a cupcake that looks amazing: the cupcake has frosting stacked 2 1/2” tall and the frosting is then dipped in chocolate. It looks similar to a Dairy Queen chocolate dipped cone. The frosting needs to be chocolate, but since it is 2 1/2” high, I want it to have a light texture and yet I’m also hoping for something shelf-stable so I won’t need to worry about freezing or refrigerating it. I will need to have them done a couple of days prior to our departure so I can also work on the cake, plus, we will then need to travel before the wedding. Does anyone out there have any great ideas for me? I would sure appreciate any suggestions. THANKS!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 October 2011 10:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3166
Joined  2010-04-25

That’s a tall [har har] order!

I’m thinking—and there are people with more experience here than I on this—that nothing will exactly match your scenario as you’d like it:

1.  Mouselline keeps for couple of days at room temp, but not as long as you’d like, and it’s too rich pile that high.

2   Most ganaches keep for about 5 days room temp, but they’re not going to pile that high, either.

3.  About the only thing I can think of that you can pile that high and have it be pleasant to eat in that quantity is Light Whipped Ganache, but it’s only good 1 day room temp.  At the same time, you will have to get it at the right moment—it’s very soft, but, as it gets to room temp, gets nearly firm (but fluffy)—so you’ll have to pipe at the right moment.  It also has a bit of a stucco appearance, so you’ll want to dip the entire top in chocolate if that doens’t appeal to you, visually.  Here’s what it looks like:  http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/3836/

I’m thinking you will have to pipe and freeze, or freeze the frosting and pipe nearer the event.  (You can also refrigerate the LWG and pipe later, as well.)

Good luck!  Your nephew is quite lucky to have such fabulous wedding desserts!  Congratulations to him!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 October 2011 11:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  5
Joined  2009-04-13

Thanks for your response, Anne. After clicking on your link, I’ve had an idea. Regarding the cake in the link, it was composed & frozen for about two weeks, and it was “completely wonderful on serving.” I’m wondering now about flip-flopping my schedule & freezing the actual wedding cake layers. Typically, I’ve read that if a cake needs to be frozen, my understanding is that it needed to be kept wrapped until thawed to prevent moisture on the outside of the icing, or something like that. Using Rose’s mousseline buttercream as my icing, I would guess that if I completely ice the layers, freeze and wrap them, and then thaw with the wrapping on, when I take off the wrap it would hurt the finish of the cake. Is that correct? Is there a different procedure I should use?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 October 2011 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3166
Joined  2010-04-25

Hi, Kerie!

You can freeze the layers alone (keep well-wrapped until thawed), or you can freeze the composed cake.

I’ve understood some folks who make wedding cakes to freeze the composed cake, except that they add the “fancy” decoration after thawing.

I haven’t made a wedding cake, but I have frozen a cake with piped edging with complete success.  This link (http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/2706/) shows the cake—the only thing I added at the end was that I added the blueberries the day of serving.  I’m no expert piper, so any “problems” were there before freezing!!

What I do is this:

1.  Compose the cake.
2.  If I have time, I refrigerate until the frosting is firm.  If not, go to step 3!
3.  Put the cake in the freezer, unwrapped, until it is frozen solid.  Make sure the cake is on a completely level surface.  You don’t want it to crack as it thaws.  I always try to freeze on my cake carrier, but if I can’t, I’ve also used several layers of the cardboards that come under frozen pizzas.
4.  Take it out and wrap it very well in plasatic wrap and then foil.  Frozen frosting can take a lot of abuse!!!
5.  Pop it back in the freezer until “it’s time.”
6.  Normally, if I’m serving on a Friday morning, I’ll take it out on a Wednesday night and put it in the fridge covered (usually by the cake carrier).  I unwrap it completely, but then I put a very gentle layer of plastic wrap over it to keep as much air off it as possible.  If it’s done gently, the frosting is still firm refrigerated, and this lifts off without marring the cake.
7.  When it’s time to bring the cake to room temp (I like to give it at least 6 hours), I take it out of the fridge, take off the plastic wrap, and sort of skew the lid—so it’s not completely uncovered, but not completely covered.  I avoid condensation on the cake this way.
8.  After about a few hours, you can take the cover off or put it on, at your preference.

You can also consider travelling with the frozen cake.  Prepare it for the fridge (take of wrapping, and drape gently with plastic wrap), and it will thaw along the way, but still be quite cold (and likely frozen) after 7 hours, so you can easily remove the plastic wrap and finish thawing when you arrive.

Let us know if you have any more questions!!!!!

I am the queen of the frozen cake—I always freeze mine.  I like them better after freezeing.  To me, they’re moister and the flavors improves.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 October 2011 01:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3166
Joined  2010-04-25

A small update:

1.  Actually, if I freeze it on my cake carrier, I skip the foil—the cover and plastic protect the cake sufficiently for weeks, and I don’t have to separate it from the bottom.  Once it’s frozen on the base, I wrap it well (except the bottom, which remains on the carrier).  I make sure the plastic wrap is against/close to the cake to keep air out, and that the plastic wrap “runs” out of the carrier so it’s trapped between the lid and the base.  When I go to thaw it, I put it in the fridge direcdtly from the freezer, and, when I’m ready to bring it to room temp, I take the lid off—the plastic wrap sticks to the lid and comes off like a hat.  I take out the plastic wrap and let the lid sit askew for a few hours and then either cover it or uncover it, as applicable.

2.  If I freeze it on a pizza round, I put a piece of plastic on the pizza round.  When the cake is frozen, I completely wrap it in plastic and then in foil, and do the rest of the stuff above.

Just thought I’d make that a little clearer.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 October 2011 05:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2011-06-02
keriearrow - 22 October 2011 03:03 AM

My nephew is getting married in early December, and I will be providing the cake as well as cupcakes, individual-size cheesecakes, and a hot cocoa bar. I will be traveling for 7 hours the night before the wedding with all of this. My question is regarding the cupcakes. They have found a site with a cupcake that looks amazing: the cupcake has frosting stacked 2 1/2” tall and the frosting is then dipped in chocolate. It looks similar to a Dairy Queen chocolate dipped cone. The frosting needs to be chocolate, but since it is 2 1/2” high, I want it to have a light texture and yet I’m also hoping for something shelf-stable so I won’t need to worry about freezing or refrigerating it. I will need to have them done a couple of days prior to our departure so I can also work on the cake, plus, we will then need to travel before the wedding. Does anyone out there have any great ideas for me? I would sure appreciate any suggestions. THANKS!

About the cupcake- It sound really really like a Hi-Hat Cupcake recipe on the Martha Stewart site. I’m not sure how stable the frosting is, but in my opinion:
It’s basically meringue and chocolate coating. The chocolate is shelf-stable as it is just chocolate [and a bit oil].
However, the meringue is swiss so while a bit more stable than regular, french meringue, I don’t know if it’s stable enough for your needs, so maybe an italian meringue is better [a sugar syrup meringue]. And it is fluffy and light.

If nothing else, maybe it has given the experts here an idea.

 Signature 

McBrownie.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 October 2011 08:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  291
Joined  2011-10-15
keriearrow - 22 October 2011 03:03 AM

My nephew is getting married in early December, and I will be providing the cake as well as cupcakes, individual-size cheesecakes, and a hot cocoa bar. I will be traveling for 7 hours the night before the wedding with all of this. My question is regarding the cupcakes. They have found a site with a cupcake that looks amazing: the cupcake has frosting stacked 2 1/2” tall and the frosting is then dipped in chocolate. It looks similar to a Dairy Queen chocolate dipped cone. The frosting needs to be chocolate, but since it is 2 1/2” high, I want it to have a light texture and yet I’m also hoping for something shelf-stable so I won’t need to worry about freezing or refrigerating it. I will need to have them done a couple of days prior to our departure so I can also work on the cake, plus, we will then need to travel before the wedding. Does anyone out there have any great ideas for me? I would sure appreciate any suggestions. THANKS!

I came across a blog the other day that had made the very cupcake you describe, though perhaps not as tall. I’m with Anne in that the mousseline would be the most stable but too rich in this quantity but it is all a matter of taste, isn’t it? This blogger used a Swiss meringue buttercream and the cupcakes do look awfully pretty. Here’s the link: http://treats-sf.blogspot.com/2011/10/hi-hat-cupcakes.html

If you were to go this route, I would recommend the chocolate mousseline recipe of one of the forum members, Bill. It’s not particularly dark in colour, but it is lovely and chocolaty.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 October 2011 12:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  87
Joined  2010-12-04

So this idea might be a bit crazy, but I was thinking…..

You may not get the height on this, and it may be a bit inappropriate for a wedding… but.. what if you had a chocolate dip cupcake setup - where you had a fondue type setup… and guests could up and dip their cupcakes in chocolate?  Just a thought smile

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 October 2011 08:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  5
Joined  2009-04-13

The treats blogspot was actually the same link she sent me. I followed those directions, and just for the record, they are really quite fabulous! Mine never were as tall as theirs, but they are still quite tasty. However, after making them, I don’t think they will work for my particular situation. I worry that the filling is not stable enough to withstand the schedule I will need to follow between preparation and travel time. I will, however, keep the recipe on hand for events. After making them, I believe next time, I would try Rose’s mousseline, though. I think/hope it would be a little more stable, which would help the process. And, even if the icing isn’t as tall, it’s still a very yummy cupcake.

Anne, thanks so much for your tips on freezing! I always freeze my layers after they are baked, but will try it now after they are iced. I work a full-time job and have a tiny cake business on the side. When I have cake jobs, the 2 days before delivery are TOTALLY locked into caking. If I could freeze the layers before hand, that would radically change my cake life!

Again, thanks for your responses! I truly appreciate your help with my situation.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 October 2011 11:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3166
Joined  2010-04-25

If I could freeze the layers before hand, that would radically change my cake life!

Tell me about it! The first time I made a cake, it was for serving on a Friday, and I decided then and there I would do a freezing experiment, as I cannot bake on week nights.  So I did it, and it worked, and I’ve always done it since!!!!

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top