Cooling Cakes
Posted: 20 November 2007 04:05 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m wondering if it is necessary to completely cool cakes when you are going to freeze or refrigerate them right afterward anyway.  Is there a concern about mold spores forming? 

Thanks!

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Posted: 20 November 2007 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I don’t know about mold spores, but I think you might be running the risk of soggy cake from the steam condensation.

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Posted: 20 November 2007 09:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I actually know quite a few bakers who like to freeze cakes while they are till warm because they say it keeps the layers more moist.  I use mostly Rose’s cake recipes, which by nature are very moist, so I’ve never felt the need to try this.  I don’t think any harm will come if you do, and I wouldn’t worry about mold unless the cake sat around at room temperature for a couple of weeks or so (but honestly, who would have leftover cake for more than a day or two, right? smile ).

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Posted: 20 November 2007 12:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Cathy in SoCal - 20 November 2007 08:05 AM

I’m wondering if it is necessary to completely cool cakes when you are going to freeze or refrigerate them right afterward anyway.  Is there a concern about mold spores forming? 

Thanks!

My experience has been cakes that are frozen before complete cooling do feel soggy after thawing.  The texture also feels different.  It makes sense to think that the moisture that condenses within the cake forms ice crystals that could change the texture of the cake.

This said, I know some bakers who purposely freeze their cakes early to take advantage of moisture trapping.  Personally, I would rather start with a good recipe, bake it well, then let it sit out until cool.  I know most of my buttercakes taste so much better after sitting on the counter for 24 hours (wrapped after completely cooled) - the flavour is fuller.

Someone who has taken food safety classes can probably comment on the mold issue.

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Posted: 21 November 2007 02:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thank you all!  Rose confirmed the soggy warning along with a sticky top.

How long do you usually let them cool?  Eg. a 8 or 9 inch?  I’ve always let them cool until they feel completely cool to the touch—but that has been for 1 1/2-2 hours.  Hector gave a tip a while ago about refrigerating or freezing right after they are cooled (instead of keeping at room temp) to prolong its freshness. 

How many of you use a wash/syrup on Rose’s butter cakes when storing in the refrigerator or freezer?  Her cakes are so perfect, that I go back and forth about actually adding anything to them.

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Posted: 21 November 2007 02:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I cool on a cooling rack for up to a couple of hours if I have the time, but I have been known to quick cool them on a rack in the fridge, or with a fan blowing over them.  I really like to frost the cake layers when they are chilled - they crumb less and hold together better. 

I’ve never used a wash or syrup on Rose’s butter cakes.  They really don’t need the extra moisture.  If I have a partial cake to store, I cover the exposed cake with pieces of waxed paper (the paper sticks to the buttercream and helps to seal in the moisture).

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Posted: 21 November 2007 03:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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You’re up late, Patricia!  You’re East Coast, right?  LOL

That is a great idea about the wax paper after the cake has been cut.

Do you freeze your cakes much?  Or do you usually bake as close to the event as possible?

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Posted: 21 November 2007 08:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Like Patrincia, I like to ice my cakes when they are chilled as well ... avoid that nasty crumb problem!  I seldom bake anything ahead of time and freeze it ... I like to bake as close to the event as possible.  I know many things freeze excellently, but I always feel like my desserts are “fresher” when I make them at the time of the event.

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Posted: 21 November 2007 09:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Cathy in SoCal - 21 November 2007 07:33 AM

You’re up late, Patricia!  You’re East Coast, right?  LOL

That is a great idea about the wax paper after the cake has been cut.

Do you freeze your cakes much?  Or do you usually bake as close to the event as possible?

Yes I admit it, I’m a bit of a night owl and I just had to check the forum before I forced myself to turn off the computer for the night (tee-hee). 

Honestly, I always tell myself that I will bake/freeze the cake layers in advance (especially for tiered cakes), but in actuality it never quite happens that way.  I’ve made 2 wedding cakes and they both kept me up for the entire 24 hour period preceeding the delivery of the cake.  I don’t mind too much - I seem to be fully wired and awake the entire time, and I love not being disturbed by kids or hubby while “creating”.  I will fall into a coma afterwards though smile.

With that said, I have frozen cake layers successfully - the main advice I can give you is wrap, wrap, wrap those layers really really well.  If you’re careful to protect those layers, you will be very pleased with the results.  (I thaw in the fridge overnight).  Freezing buttercream is a little less work - I use a standard freezer bag, but I know Hector uses his vacuum sealer and loves it (if I had one I’d do the same).

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Posted: 21 November 2007 03:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Yes, I have trouble getting off at night & getting to bed b/c it is so nice and quiet, and I’m able to catch up on the finer things in life.  grin

I do also like to make the cakes as close to the event as possible b/c they are so perfect alone.  I have added a wash when freezing ahead before, and they turned out great.  But it has to be just the right amount of wash.  That is the tricky part, I think.

I’d rather just make it a 24 hour or so work day to ensure everyone else gets to enjoy the Rose Perfect Moisture-Texture Factor. tongue laugh

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Posted: 21 November 2007 10:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Patrincia - 21 November 2007 01:41 PM

the main advice I can give you is wrap, wrap, wrap those layers really really well.  If you’re careful to protect those layers, you will be very pleased with the results.  (I thaw in the fridge overnight).  Freezing buttercream is a little less work - I use a standard freezer bag, but I know Hector uses his vacuum sealer and loves it (if I had one I’d do the same).

I agree with “wrap, wrap, wrap.”

This is what I do: first I place the cake in a ziplock, then I suck the air out of it. Next, I wrap it in foil. Last, I finish it with Saran.  I have never had a freezer burnt cake. =)  As to thawing, I’ve done both fridge and counter, depending on how much time I have… don’t really notice much quality difference, if there is at all.

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