Mandoline
Posted: 07 November 2011 10:46 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Ok this is not about cakes but is cooking related. Who uses a mandoline and which one do you recommend? thanks

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Posted: 08 November 2011 10:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I’m also interested in hearing about anyone’s experience with a mandoline.  I go back and forth trying to decide if I need/want one, sometimes I think I should just use a knife smile

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Posted: 12 April 2012 12:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Think about what you’re trying to accomplish, and look at the specifications.  If the goal is to produce slices with perfect uniformity, a mandoline makes good sense.  This uniformity conveys a sense of quality to restaurant food, which is one source of the mandoline’s popularity.

Many mandolines I found in the stores and on line were only good down to 1/8 inch, just under 3mm.  Look at a ruler and decide what kind of potato chips that would make: very thick “hand cut” chips.  Some mandolines claim to do 0.5mm, which would produce standard American potato chips.

Most mandolines make very nice 3/8 inch slices, so they can make great french fries and carrot sticks.  Cucumbers, peppers, small onions, summer squash and zucchini are easy to work with.  Large onions, eggplants, turnips, beets and potatoes don’t fit unless you cut them to a starting shape, but that’s doable enough.  You can even slice herbs and greens if you bundle them together tightly, say with a rubber band.  If you want to slice tomatoes, consider that tomatoes are messy if pushed, and a rotating circular blade might be a better choice.  You could freeze the tomato, but I’d be reluctant to bet my hands against a mandoline fighting anything hard-frozen. 

Look for interesting results when slicing most fruits.  But ordinarily you wouldn’t use one to slice citrus, except it’s a great tool for making candied orange peel.  I’d stick with a knife for pineapple.

If you want to slice a roast, the mandoline isn’t wide enough.  If you want to slice bacon you can’t really push correctly to get that long cut.  For meats, a circular slicer looks like the best way to go, though a mandoline could slice pepperoni nicely.

A mandoline would do a great job with Swiss cheese or cheddar, but think about what would happen to a sticky brie.

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Posted: 06 June 2012 06:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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ThirsyBrooks gives a very good reply, I agree.  I inherited a metal madoline and I haven’t really used it as much as I would like.  It is pretty complicated to operate and clean.  I end up wasting a lot of the vegetables I try to slice.  It came with a glove and I definitely recommend that to keep from slicing your hand.  On the positive side you do get speed,  control and precision with your cutting that, at least with my knife skills, I can’t obtain.  I too would like to hear if there are brands that are good and easy to use.  grin

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Rose Braverman
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Posted: 07 June 2012 10:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Cooks Illustrated recommends the OXO Good Grips with the V-Blade.  The Kyocera gets good marks, too.  For softer products, a V-Blade or diagonal blade is very important to get clean slices.

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Posted: 09 June 2012 12:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks very much for the suggestions and the tip about the V-Blade, I will check into this further.  Aloha.

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Rose Braverman
Molokai Hawaii

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