Cornstarch custard between layers & freezing
Posted: 06 January 2012 10:53 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi, all!

This (non-Rose) cake has cornstarch-thickened custard between the layers and in teh buttercream (which is only the custad, butter, and a little powdered sugar).  Cornstarch is not supposed to freeze successfully.  However, I have a friend who has made this cake a gazillion times and frozen it with absolute success.

Any thoughts on this????  Despite physical evidence to the contrary, I am, of course, paranoid it will not work.

Thanks!

—ak

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Posted: 06 January 2012 11:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Cornstarch will normally thin after freezing and thawing.  It’s possible the custard has enough eggs to remain thick after freezing (i.e., the cornstarch is redundant), and/or the cake is absorbing the bit of liquid given off when it thins.

If you make the custard with an appropriate amount of gelatin, white chocolate, tapioca/cassava starch or wheat flour, instead of the cornstarch, you should be able to freeze it for at least month or so. 

What’s the rest of the cake like?

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Posted: 06 January 2012 12:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It’s like this:  http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/throwdowns-toasted-coconut-cake-with-coconut-filling-and-coconut-buttercream-recipe/index.html

And I hear it’s phenomenal.  I’m even trying despite the fact that it’s syruped—you know me and my syrup problems.

If you have a moment to scope it, let me know if you think the cornstarch is okay. I’m fine with using flour, as well—I always feel safer with it?  If I use flour, how much would you suggest (and I assume I’d thicken the milks with it and then add to eggs?  I’m always paranoid of cornstarch, becuase sometimes it just doesn’t work for me at all—I’ve give off some kind of anti-cornstarch vibration to it, and it refuses to work for me. 

Thanks, Julie!!!

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Posted: 06 January 2012 07:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The custard is a creme anglaise / creme patisserie - you are going to be fine!  It’s the same technique; mix the sugar and cornstarch together and then add to the yolks and mix well and you won’t have any problems at all. 

If you are interested in a coconut cake, the best filling I have ever had is in the Peninsula Grill’s Coconut Cake recipe on the epicurious.com web site. I sometimes add more shredded coconut than it calls for - for when I want to use it to top cupcakes.  It’s really, really good - although I’ve been told it is not the same as the cake sold in the restaurant.  No matter - good is good! smile

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Posted: 06 January 2012 08:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Sounds like you have two votes for freezing it- Jeanne, who’s a knowledgeable professional, and your friend.  smile

If you want to experiment with flour, rose has a pastry cream made with flour in her Bernachon translation.  It has more thickening from flour and less from yolks as compared to your recipe- for the same amount of milk, it calls for 3 yolks and, if making it ahead, 35 g of AP flour (more if making the same day).

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Posted: 06 January 2012 10:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks, Jeanne & Julie!!!

Jeanne, one can never have too many coconut cakes, so I will have to try that recipe next!  I’m generally please with BA cakes, too, so I know it will be good!! Thanks!

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Posted: 07 January 2012 08:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Anne, I’m telling you!  This cake is a dream.  Not the time to experiment, though I know you do so quite successfully.  Use the corn starch already!  I’ve frozen it many times, though not for longer than 3-4 days.  IMHO and from everyone I’ve ever served this cake to, it’s the best coconut cake, hands down.  No offense to the two coconut cakes in RHC, which I also adore. My only change to the recipe is that I increase the powdered sugar in the buttercream to 2/3 cup.  1/3 works okay but my office folks like it a tad sweeter.  Have fun with this cake and enjoy!!!

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Posted: 07 January 2012 10:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Thanks, Loop!!!!!  I took your advice: Recipe as-is: check.  Corn starch: check.  Will freeze!  Will add extra powdered sugar!  Can’t wait to eat it—probably the Friday after MLK.

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Posted: 21 January 2012 02:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I just wanted to say that freezing this cake worked perfectly.  This cake was an undisputed success.  It was described as “unreasonably delicious.”  Also, “It’s like crack—you can’t stop eating it.”  And no less than three people had two slices, one saying, “I can’t control myself—I have to have nother piece NOW.”  So, if you are a fan of coconut cakes and are looking for new ones, be sure to add this one to your list!  It was recommended to me to double the sugar in the frosting (which has hardly any at all), and I did so and agree wholehartedly.  Although I am generally a cold cake gal, this cake is best at room temp with no chill at all, making it supremely light and fluffy.

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Posted: 21 January 2012 10:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Looks great, Anne, love the toasted coconut and the tall, fluffy layers! smile  Any left for me?

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Posted: 21 January 2012 11:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Thanks, Julie!

I wish you could have tried it!  You’d never think a cake with that ishocking ngredient list could be so incredibly light.

However, the “tall, fluffy layers” are a trick of the camera or something!  The cake was supposed to be two 9x2” layers torted to make 4 layers.  However, mine didn’t rise, really, almost at all—each was like 3/4” tall.  It was so sad!  So I had to make two batches and made it a 3-layer cake.  I was worried they’d be dense and squish the soft filling when it was cut, but it was no problem.

When I make my February cake, I’m getting new baking powder (even though I really think what I had couldn’t have been old).  If that cake doesn’t rise, my hand mixer is getting the bird!!  I’ve had this problem before, and I know a flat cake tastes fine—perception of super-moistness, even, but, fer Pete’s sake, it’s the principle of the thing, right?

—ak

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