Scaling Liquids
Posted: 12 January 2012 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Does anyone know of a scale which measures ml?  I’m encountering some classic recipes which list ingredients in ml.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 12:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi, FG!!!

I’d convert ml to liquid ounces (http://www.convertunits.com/from/ml/to/oz) and then see how much that weighs by comparing to a Rose recipe.

For example, if a recipe calls for 235 ml milk, that is (according to the web site above) 7.94 liquid ounces—8 liquid ounces.

A Rose recipe that calls for 8 oz milk shows that as weighing 242 g.

Would that work for you?

—ak

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Posted: 12 January 2012 12:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Cool Anne, thank you!

Would that conversion work for determining the weight of ml of pureed fruit ?

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Posted: 12 January 2012 12:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Well, you have to have something to compare it against, and I don’t think Rose has anywhere the weight of pureed fruit given in a liquid ounce measurement—she’d always go with a solid ounce measurement.  And it would always depend upon how liquidy one fruit was as compared to another, anyway.  In this case, I think I’d just fill the old pyrex up to the liquid measure called for!!!!

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Posted: 12 January 2012 12:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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That is what I did do and it came out great. But, for example, I’m using a professional pastry book and the author lists all non-solid ingredients in ml, is there a scale that measures ml or will I have to use the old pyrex for that.  P.S. I don’t like the new pyrex and recently found some old pyrex and grabbed it.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 02:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I don’t think you can weigh ml in a “vacuum,” becuase it depends on the liquid—165 ml of pureed fruit would likely weigh more than 165 ml of milk because of the solids.  And 165 ml oil will likely weigh differently from both.  So I don’t think you can weigh ml in an absolute way.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Thank you Anne. I guess I better keep those old pyrex handy.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 03:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Flour Girl - 12 January 2012 03:57 PM

Does anyone know of a scale which measures ml?  I’m encountering some classic recipes which list ingredients in ml.

No scale in the entire universe can weigh ml (milliliters), because that’s a unit of volume, not weight.

However, for a given liquid, a certain volume of it will weigh the same, so once you know how much 1 ml weighs, you can convert the volume measurements to an equivalent weight.  I’d pour the liquid in a measuring cup and weigh it; then you’ll be able to use weight measurements in the future.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 06:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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So, all I have to do is weigh it one time. That’s a great idea. Thank you Charles. Will be sticking post-its on the recipe’s page.

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