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Baking Powder Levels…
Posted: 27 January 2012 03:20 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I am not new to baking but new to RLB way…I’m a little confused on the calculations for the baking powder amounts…my neice asked me to make her wedding cake, she wants a white cake with tier sizes of 6”, 10”, 14”, 18” (and 20”)....with white icing.  I calculated from the book the total of the Rose Factor for the first 4 pan sizes to get the grams for baking powder needed which was 144.5 grams for the 18” pan…now this is where I’m lost.  How do I figure the remainder pan sizes as well as the 20” pan OR can I make enough batter from the recipes in the book to fill the pans? (Like doubling the recipe) Thanks for any input. smile

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Posted: 27 January 2012 04:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi Justnuts62!

Welcome!  You are correct in the amount of baking powder for the 18” cake.  To get the appropriate amount of batter for 1 - 18” layer, you need to multiply the base on P. 491 x 17 (since that is the Rose factor). 
Since the base recipe makes approximately enough batter for a 4.5” cake, you would need about 22.22 x the base recipe for a 20” layer.  That said, I don’t know that Rose recommends making larger cakes as it becomes more difficult to bake evenly.  You may want to try the same baking powder level as for 18” and just x that level by 22 OR you could reduce by 1/8tsp. and x by 22 and see how that works.  As far as I know it’s uncharted territory.  Good luck and do report back!

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Posted: 30 January 2012 03:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Sherrie…..

grin Thank You…happy to be here!  Now what about the smaller tiers. Also, lost on the smaller tiers.

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Posted: 30 January 2012 08:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hi.
It’s basically the same process as for the 18” layers.  Since a 6” layer is a rose factor 2—you multiply the quantities in the base formula by 2 on P. 491.  Then, since it is a Level 1 baking powder, you multiply the Level 1 baking powder amount on P. 492 by 2 (since it is a 6” cake—the 7 and 8 inch fall in this level too, so you need to scale accordingly).  If you plan to make 2 layers, then double all of the quantities so you have 2 - 6” cakes.  Hope this makes sense.

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Posted: 01 February 2012 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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excaim Thank You!  Now I can begin.  Big Hug!

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Posted: 02 February 2012 12:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Keep us posted, especially with pictures of the end product!  What kind of “white icing” are you planning to do for the cake?  Love to know more about the cake(s)!

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Posted: 04 February 2012 09:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I am looking for a not too sweet buttercream. I found a couple online that contain flour as opposed to all confectioner’s sugar, one recipe had more crisco than butter, etc….any great suggestions?  Also, if I were to bake Rose’s White Velvet Cake, can I double/triple the recipe to fit into the 18” pan?  As you can see, I am a little nervouse about baking such large cakes. LOL…

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Posted: 05 February 2012 12:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I need to make sure we are on the same page:  The White Velvet is the same cake as the White Butter Cake in the wedding cake section (I’ve been confused about this before).  So, the recipe on P. 46 of TCB is basically the same cake as in the charts on P. 491/492—just scaled for 2 - 9” by 1.5” layers.  You don’t need to triple/double the recipe on P.46—just use the chart on P.491/492 as described above.  If you have Rose’s TCB, then she has many, many delicious frostings.  The Italian Mouselline Buttercream is very popular among members of the forum.  It is incredibly stable and can easily be flavored.  It pipes beautifully and is incredibly smooth and does not crust like a confectioner’s sugar frosting.  You should try a batch…to see if you like it.  It does need some flavoring/liqueur to balance the butteriness.  I really like the white chocolate variation.  If you do make it:
*use a reliable candy thermometer to get the sugar syrup perfect
*ensure your butter is about 65F
*DO not panic if it curdles—usually this is just a matter of temperature—either too cool or too warm. 
*If you rebeat—allow to come to room temperature first.
*If you do make the white chocolate—I find it incorporates best if I remove some buttercream (about a cup), whisk in some melted and cooled chocolate and then add back to the buttercream.  On some occasions, when I add the chocolate directly, it clumps before it’s mixed in and I get lumps (I have a cool home in winter)—this eliminates this problem. 


As far as fillings, the Neoclassic is a great way to use up yolks (from the white velvet)—it’s easy, but it’s not pure white. 

Check out Rose’s videos as there are video instructions for the buttercreams—she does have a newer method for the mouselline (adds the meringue to the butter), but I’ve never had issues with the old technique.

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Posted: 08 February 2012 07:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I tried the Mousseline Buttercream! Wow….nice AND my niece loved it!! A final quesyion….the wedding is in August…if I make the White Velvet Cake and the Mousseline Buttercream about a month out….how well will these freeze and thaw?

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Posted: 08 February 2012 10:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Perfectly!  Just be sure to freeze well-wrapped, airtight in a double layer of plastic wrap and then a layer of foil.  If the cake is to be frozen already frosted, then freeze uncovered just until hard, then wrap.

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Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  Peanut Butter Cups, All Grown Up

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Posted: 08 February 2012 10:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Yes to what Julie says.

If you freeze the cake and mousseline separately, be sure you thaw the mousseline COMPLETELY COMPLETELY COMPLETELY.  Then rebeat it a bit before frosting the cake to restore it’s texture. 

Give it plenty of time to come to room temp (take from freezer to fridge one night and then, the next night, from the fridge to the counter overnight—or about 8 hours, depending on how much you’ve made)), because you don’t want to beat it cold, or it might curdle on you.  If you forget, you can dice it up (like butter) so it thaws more quickly.  Others zap it with short bursts in the microwave to thaw, but I don’t know how to do that.

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Posted: 10 February 2012 11:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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THANK YOU for the responses….I will give it a go. I will have ALOT of cake to bake and frosting to mix. I LOVE THIS SITE!!! Everyone has been so kind in responses, tips, etc….Loving it!

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Posted: 19 March 2012 08:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I have another question….how is this buttercream’s character in August temps?

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Posted: 19 March 2012 10:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Hi, Nut!

Mousseline is supposed to be the most stable of all options in warm temps.  Of course, you wouldn’t want it in direct August sunlight, but I’m sure you already knew that!

—ak

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Posted: 20 March 2012 06:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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nice! Thank you!

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Posted: 22 March 2012 04:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Anne in NC…Thank You, you have given me much confidence with this cake! One final question and I will not ‘bug’ you anymore….what about slices of strawberries in between the layers?  I want to put a layer a buttercream then a layer of strawberries then a layer of butter cream on top of them before placing the cake layer on top of that…. sandwiching the strawberries between buttercream.  I am assuming I would have to do this (at the most) two days from wedding day???

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