Sponge cake baked in sheet pan sank in middle - please help
Posted: 31 March 2012 06:22 PM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  25
Joined  2010-02-10

I recently tried baking a separated egg sponge cake in a 13x9 pan. The recipe called for 5 large eggs separated, 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 1/3 cup milk and 11/4 tsp baking powder. The batter rose well in my 350 oven and was done in 25 minutes, way before the expected 35-45 minutes baking time. Halfway throughout the baking time, I had lowered the temperature to 325, to prevent browning of the top.

However, in parts, the cake sank around the middle and at one place near the edge. I am looking for an explanation for this so that I can take care of the problem next time.

1)was it because I lowered the temperature halfway in the process- should i have kept it at 350 all along and covered with foil? Does a foam cake like this need higher or lower temperature to set?

2) should I have used a lowered temperature of 325 like biscuit de savoie throughout for slow and even baking?

3) that I need to use less baking powder or none at all - recipe requires it.

4) that the cake was baked in a 13x9 flat pan which affects structure - again that was a part of the recipe.

5) one more thing that keeps on bugging me,could it also be that the egg white did not completely and perfectly fold in the egg yolk mixture causing the cake to deflate where there was extra egg white?

Please help.I was thinking of baking it at 350 next time with less baking powder and not change temperature at all. This cake needs to be baked in a sheet pan so I cannot change that parameter.

Please help me so I can figure out which parameter to change

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 March 2012 07:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  904
Joined  2009-05-25

I assume with a 13 x 9 pan you are baking a 2” high sponge cake??  I am not an expert sponge cake baker and am still feeling my way through them, but…
1)  Looking at your recipe, you have leavening—so this means your aeration is not entirely dependent upon your foam structure.  For Rose’s butter cakes, she uses less leavening proportionately for larger cakes.  So it could be a leavening issue.
2)  A higher temperature is needed to set sponge cakes.
3)  For a non-leavened sponge cake, the door of the oven should not be opened until minimum bake time, or risk of collapse can occur.
4)  Do not use foil on the cake.  Instead, I would try baking a bit lower in the oven.  Can always peel off the browned top anyway—sponge cake tops get gummy so it’s usually something that needs to be done. 
5)  Test your oven with an accurate thermometer, many ovens are off. 

Personally, I think I would start with the recipe.  Unless you absolutely adore this particular recipe, start with one that has been well tested.  Rose’s recipes are well balanced and tested—if you don’t have her books, go and find one at a library to start with—if you bake cakes, The Cake Bible is absolutely insdispensable.  That said not all of her cakes will bake well in a 9 x13” pan, but I think a genoise should be just fine.  For one of her chiffon cakes, a flower nail is used to help conduct heat to the centre of the cake to help set the interior in a larger pan.  You could try this.  I’ve done it with larger butter cakes and it seems to help.  Just insert the nail (flat side on the bottom of the pan) and just be careful when unmolding the cake.  You do mention biscuit de savoie—are you wanting a cake like that or a higher layer style cake?

Here is a video of one of her sponge cake demonstrations, perhaps it will help:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qI-QzZGHYZU

There is LOTS of discussion on the forum about sponge cakes and developing foam structure…search and you will find much more expertise.  Good luck!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 01 April 2012 05:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  904
Joined  2009-05-25

I see from your other posts that you have TCB—on P. 503 is the master chart for genoise for wedding cakes.  There is a 9 x 13” option there and the recipe is for the chocolate genoise and the genoise classique.  The only note I have about this cake is to make “extra” beurre noisette because the suggested starting amounts of butter (from the ingredients section, I think….) left me with too little beurre noisette—it’s not a bad thing to have extra of anyway.  Hope this helps!

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top