How to bake biscuit de layered sheet cake
Posted: 31 March 2012 06:45 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I have had success with biscuit de savoie baked in 9 inch round pan. The texture and the ease of preparation works for me.  Have always had issues with genoise. I would like to use this recipe for making basic sponge cakes going forward.

I need to be able to make sheet cakes with this recipe. What works better:

1) making 2/3 thin sheets of savoie, the fill /frost / stack the layers? Should I bake them at 325, same temperature as original cake?

2) baking a 2 inch deep sheet savoie cake, torting it, filling and then frosting it? What temperature should I use for this deep sponge cake?  I recently followed a similar recipe with baking powder that was baked in a 13x9 pan at 350. I did lower the temperature halfway throughout the process but the cake sank in parts around the edge and middle.

My preference is to bake a deep sheet cake since it requires less effort and if I can figure out a foolproof way to do this without the cake sinking, that would be nice. Any feedback would be really helpful.

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Posted: 02 April 2012 12:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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dear, i have baked biscuit as layer cakes of up to 18” diameter x 2” deep.  i think a sheet of the thickness you need (lest say 1” or 2/3” is better than baking a 2” or 3” deep sheet.  baking temperature the same.  time longer or shorter depending on how big the cake is.

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Posted: 02 April 2012 12:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Dear Hector,

Thanks so much for getting back. I have been following your previous posts on baking biscuit de savoie in big round pans very closely and that spurred me on to make my own last week.

When you say bake upto 1 inch, what kind of pan are you suggesting? My jelly roll pan will give me even thinner sheets and I do not have a sheet pan that is only 1 inch high. So should I bake in a regular sheet pan 2 inch deep, with less batter?

Could you please give me an estimate of batter size for this layered sheet baking? Would you say 2x recipe for 11x15 pan and 3x recipe for 12x18 pan?

And if I try a 2 inch deep sheet cake, your suggestion was to fill the pan very full, because these cakes do not rise much. So should I use about 3x recipe for 11x15 and 4x for 12x18 pan in this case? This probably may not be feasible to make in my mixer since that is a lot of foam batter to handle.

Since these are baked in such wide pans, should I use a flower nail?

I know these are a lot of questions but You Are the Savioe expert here and these are huge batter sizes, so I would really like to minimize chances of error. Please let me know if possible.

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Posted: 02 April 2012 01:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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you don’t need a flower nail on a biscuit baked on a sheet pan up to 1” deep.  biscuit is very airy, heat goes in quite fast, unlike on a denser butter cake.  also at these depths, heat goes in fast.

i have never seen a sheet pan baked 2” deep, so i don’t have any experience to report.  if you have a rectangular pan or square pan, 2” deep, and lets say, up to 16” diagonal (which would be much smaller in width or length), it should work fine since i was able to do so on a 16” round.

to calculate batter size you need to apply math, and find the volume of a cube and a cylinder.  do not underfill the pans as the extra metal on the sides of the pan will scorch the sides of the delicate biscuit.

thx for visiting my postings :=)

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