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Tall cake
Posted: 22 May 2012 10:28 PM   [ Ignore ]
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So difficult to find a recipe for very tall cake! Without stacking. Is it very difficult to bake?

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Posted: 22 May 2012 10:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi, rafemama!

Welcome!

Nearly all of Rose’s cakes—I think there’s only one exception—are made for 2” pans or less.  I think it takes so long to bake a “tall” cake that the outside gets dried out by the time the middle is cooked, which is why bundt cakes, which are taller than “regular” cakes,  have the inner tube—to transmit heat to the middle so everything cooks evenly.

Unfortunately, I don’t know of any recipes for tall cakes that work, but someone might!!

You can always stack with just a very thin layer of ganache or frosting—just enough to stick them together.

—ak

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Posted: 23 May 2012 04:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thanks for the reply! I saw some very tall cake and I think the key thing is to control the oven temp very well, but how to do that?

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Posted: 23 May 2012 10:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I wonder if you could extend the flour nail concept to having a sort of thin “lightening rod” in the middle of the cake.  I don’t know, though, it seems like to make a tall cake (and, quite frankly, I don’t know how tall we’re talking about), it will take a lot of push to lift that much cake!!!!  And then you have it very close to the bottom.  I don’t know.  I’d just go ahead and layer!

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Posted: 23 May 2012 02:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I agree with Anne.  It’s not worth having a tall cake at the expense of texture/baking quality.

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Posted: 27 May 2012 03:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I think a baking powder cake will NEVER bake as a layer cake deeper than with a 2” pan!  there is a lot of chemistry and physics involved.  A genoise and biscuit (non baking powder cakes) bakes alright on deeper pans up to 3” but will shrink a bit.

Use several pans and stack!

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Posted: 27 May 2012 03:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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hectorwong - 27 May 2012 06:28 PM

I think a baking powder cake will NEVER bake as a layer cake deeper than with a 2” pan!

Many of Miette’s recipes call for a 3” pan, and I’ve seen others.  Bundt cakes can be even taller, but you apparently run into the evenness of baking issue before you hit a baking powder issue.

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Posted: 27 May 2012 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Are most of miette’s 6” pans?  I yet have to see a downy yellow cake baked on a 9” pan.  3” deep.  And be as good as a 2” deep one!

The miette cook book was done so terribly that it was taken off the market soon after it released and I think it has been revised and released again?

For baking powder cakes I was refering more to butter or oil cakes where the structure does not depend on whipped eggs.  Cakes which structure depends on whipped eggs normally don’t use baking powder (except the chiffon cake), has a easier hability to bake at depths, they are lighter in weight and will climb at ease, they use syrup after baking so it can bake a little more dry to fully cook on deeper pans, etc, etc.

there are chemicals other than baking powder which aid commercial cakes to bake at depths.  But I don’t like the taste nor the texture.

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Posted: 27 May 2012 05:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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hectorwong - 27 May 2012 07:22 PM

Are most of miette’s 6” pans?  ... The miette cook book was done so terribly that it was taken off the market soon after it released and I think it has been revised and released again?

Yes and yes.  Amazon sent me a new, corrected Miette book at no charge last October.  I used a 7” inch pan and it baked up closer to 2”.  The recipes call for All Purpose flour (unbleached), so they probably have a stronger structure than do Rose’s recipes.  I accidentally used cake flour for one batch and it turned out fine, too.

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Posted: 27 May 2012 07:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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well, I did spoke to someone who bake very tall cake using 4 inch height pan. and the cake did rise higher than 4 inch, so I think baking a very tall cake can be done. just have to have a good control of the oven heat.

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Posted: 27 May 2012 08:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Perhaps that person will give you their recipe and tips.

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Posted: 27 May 2012 08:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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rafemama - 27 May 2012 10:43 PM

I think baking a very tall cake can be done. just have to have a good control of the oven heat.

I agree that it probably can be done.  Reducing the temperature would help, as would a flower nail or two in the center.  You’d may need to use recipes that use All Purpose flour.  The cake has a good chance of being dry, though, so applying a syrup after baking is an idea.

It’s not clear to me, though, why you wish to take this route, rather than the more common technique of baking multiple layers.  The latter would likely result in a superior product.

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Posted: 28 May 2012 03:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Anne in NC - 27 May 2012 11:15 PM

Perhaps that person will give you their recipe and tips.

dont think they will coz they are selling the cake.

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Posted: 28 May 2012 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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I always use the nail or that core that wilton sells.  In addition to the nail,  I put the baking strips around it.  How tall do you want to make this cake ?.  You cannot possibly make a one layer cake as tall as a bundt cake.  Bundt pans have that hole in the middle that helps the heating and the baking.  I only go as high at 3 1/2 inch for one layer.  good luck

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Posted: 28 May 2012 11:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Thanks for the tip! smile

how about 4 inch? I saw this 4 inch (height) round pan in a wilton speciality store so I think 4 inch can be done.

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Posted: 29 May 2012 03:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I suspect that it is actually no problem to craft a cake recipe that will bake in a 4” high pan.  The problem is, one sacrifices texture dramatically, because you have to have the structure of the batter be much stronger to hold up the weight of a deep layer of cake without collapsing.  So when you go to eat it, it is tough, and possibly dry if you’ve overcooked the outside by the time the center gets done.

Given how difficult it can be to torte a cake into several layers, and how difficult it can be to bake a deep layer without drying out, it seems a whole lot easier and tastier to go with shorter layers.

All that said, if you’re determined to try, I’d recommend starting with a type of cake that naturally has more structure built into it:  a yeasted cake (baba au rhum or brioche) or a sponge cake like biscuit de savoie.  Both of those cakes have structure to spare and plenty of syrup to tenderize.

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