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Tall cake
Posted: 30 May 2012 12:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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not sure about that, but I attached a picture to show a tall cake, and it doesn’t look dry or tough.

the store will not give out the recipe. all I know (when I spoke to them) is that, regardless of what recipe, the key thing is to control the oven temperature. Measure the batter well, for example, in a 2 inch pan, the batter amount is xx gram, for 3 inch the batter amount is yy gram. from what I understand, the key thing is oven temperature.

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Posted: 30 May 2012 01:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Looks to me that the cake has a small diameter, maybe 6 inches?  That makes a big difference.  That would improve heat penetration to the interior and make structure less of an issue.  I’d grab any cake recipe using all purpose flour, but lower the baking temperature to something like 325.

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Posted: 30 May 2012 02:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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think probably hsa to put temp to high for iniitial 3 mins and subsequently reduce the temp step by step. and maybe put a baking ring to prevent the side from burning.

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Posted: 30 May 2012 02:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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rafemama - 30 May 2012 05:16 AM

think probably hsa to put temp to high for iniitial 3 mins and subsequently reduce the temp step by step. and maybe put a baking ring to prevent the side from burning.


Perhaps, but I would personally try the simple way before moving to something complex.  This cake is only 1 inch higher than the ones in the Miette cookbook, which don’t require any special techniques.

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Posted: 04 June 2012 09:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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I took a Wilton decorating course once (and I was the odd one who brought all of these “other” buttercreams/ganaches, etc.)—mostly for the techniques, not the recipes. BUT…the instructor said she always baked her cakes in a water bath—butter cakes and all.  So…perhaps that is the answer.

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Posted: 13 June 2012 05:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Was that “tall” cake a Chinese style “sponge” cake? They make those at Chinese bakeries and they’re quite tall. I would definitely suggest a sponge cake, maybe get a thin stainless Steel rod attached to a metal plate for the centre. Sounds very interesting, altho I personally would opt for layers)...I have also often made a twelve inch high Cake Panda Bear - but the fluted shape of the Wilton Panda Pan with the Core hanging in the centre makes it rise and work just fine. I use a fairly sturdy Chocolate Cake recipe with A/P Flour (Canadian high protein type). Good luck and I look forward to hearing how it works.

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