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Many Splendid Cake Question
Posted: 29 June 2012 11:36 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Does anyone know if I can sub white whole wheat and/or pastry flour for the bleached AP flour used in this recipe?

Thank you

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Posted: 29 June 2012 09:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Thank you anyway.  I was about to bake when I posted this question and could not wait for an answer.  I didn’t replace the bleached AP flour with pastry flour or whole wheat flour; but, I did replace it with unbleached AP flour using the same gram weight as provided in the original recipe.  I also modified the recipe to be low cholesterol by using 1 egg and 2 egg whites instead of 2 whole eggs.

It’s delicious. I should really make this more often.

Thanks, again! Sorry I could not wait as I had to bake in the morning smile

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Posted: 30 June 2012 12:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It looks beautiful, FG!  I wish I could have answered your question, but I had no clue, myself!!!

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Posted: 30 June 2012 01:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thank you!

I should have posted the question the day before instead of at the last minute, as I always do.  I called King Arthur Flour. They have bakers there to help you with your baking questions.  They told me not to use the pastry or whole wheat flours but to use regular unbleached flour and to increase the liquid. I didn’t take their advice about the liquid. Instead, I used unbleached AP flour at the same gram weight as Rose indicated for the bleached flour.  It came out perfect!!

Anne, this recipe is my new current favorite of all the recipes I have been modifying.  It is really, really good and has oatmeal (I don’t use instant, I use regular old fashioned rolled oats) for a fiber boost which helps with low cholesterol management.

I love it!

I have 4 more bananas. Today I am making the banana refrigerator cake in RHC and tomorrow I will make 2 more of the Many Splendid cakes.

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Posted: 30 June 2012 03:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Sounds delicious!  Since it doesn’t have melted butter, it should be fine with unbleached flour, though less tender because unbleached generally has higher protein then bleached.  Whole wheat pastry flour would absorb more liquid than unbleached and also compromise the structure, so it may have been dense and/or flat topped instead of rounded.

Thanks for the reminder about how delicious this is, I haven’t made it since RHC first came out. smile

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Posted: 01 July 2012 12:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’m back with an update:  A lesson I learned today is, DON’T MESS WITH ROSE’S RECIPES.  The cake is gummy today. Never gonna second guess Rose again

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Posted: 01 July 2012 03:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Flour Girl - 01 July 2012 03:53 PM

Never gonna second guess Rose again

Do you think that Rose never had disasters while constructing her own recipes?  Part of learning what works is to learn what doesn’t work and why.  I reference my signature at the bottom.

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If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

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Posted: 01 July 2012 03:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I think I have started to travel that path now. Thank you! You made me feel better.

One of my husband’s favorite sayings is, “Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement”.

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Posted: 01 July 2012 10:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Flour Girl - 01 July 2012 06:50 PM

One of my husband’s favorite sayings is, “Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement”.

I wonder if he had that philosophical attitude when one of your kids executed bad judgement?  grin


But on a more solution-oriented note, what exactly is “gummy”?  I know we’ve all experienced it, but what exactly is it in terms of the physical structure of matter?  You’d said the texture was perfect after it was baked.  How can it go from perfect to gummy?

In reviewing your changes, I wonder if your substitution of rolled oats could be the source of the “gumminess”?  Instant oats absorbs water during the mixing phase, but rolled oats probably takes a much longer time to absorb water (which is why people use “instant”).  It might have pulled the water from the rest of the cake while it sat after baking, possibly producing something that could qualify as gummy.

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Posted: 02 July 2012 01:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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CharlesT - 02 July 2012 01:57 AM
Flour Girl - 01 July 2012 06:50 PM

One of my husband’s favorite sayings is, “Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement”.

I wonder if he had that philosophical attitude when one of your kids executed bad judgement?  grin

Yes he did because the punishment is the experience too.  He made our son dig up a stand of Madrona trees using a hand trowel. That was just one time. There were others.

But on a more solution-oriented note, what exactly is “gummy”?  I know we’ve all experienced it, but what exactly is it in terms of the physical structure of matter?  You’d said the texture was perfect after it was baked.  How can it go from perfect to gummy?

There are changes in the crumb consistency which develop over time. A dense band initially develops proximate to the distal border and then slowly spreads.  It seems as though the band has an oily-moist texture. Perhaps it is part of the aging process but I wouldn’t call it stale. I guess it can be compared to a metamorphosis.

In reviewing your changes, I wonder if your substitution of rolled oats could be the source of the “gumminess”?  Instant oats absorbs water during the mixing phase, but rolled oats probably takes a much longer time to absorb water (which is why people use “instant”).  It might have pulled the water from the rest of the cake while it sat after baking, possibly producing something that could qualify as gummy.

That is an interesting theory. Do you feel the oats are more likely the cause then the unbleached AP flour? I always use old fashioned rolled oats. I don’t remember if I noticed gumminess before since it has been so long since I made this recipe.  Today is day 5 for the cake.  I could bake the cake tomorrow using cake flour and see if the same changes ensue in 5 days. I don’t have instant oats in the house or I would experiment with using it as well.

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Posted: 02 July 2012 02:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Flour Girl - 02 July 2012 04:46 AM

Do you feel the oats are more likely the cause then the unbleached AP flour?

I’ve never used unbleached AP flour when the recipe called for bleached cake flour, but from what I recall of the reports that I’ve seen here, the problems are evident immediately after baking.  If I’m remembering that correctly, then what you see is inconsistent with the normal problems associated with using unbleached flour.

My guess about the instant oats is drawn from my experience with substituting potato starch for potato flakes in my dinner roll recipe.  Potato flakes are similar to instant oats in that they’re precooked and then dried.  They’ll both reconstitute very easily with water, unlike the original product.  When I tried using potato starch (made from uncooked potatoes), it did not absorb much moisture while I was mixing the dough and I had to add a LOT more flour.  However in the day or so the dough spent in the fridge, it then grabbed a ton of water from the rest of the dough, leaving it dry as a bone.  I can’t say that the result was gummy, but potato starch isn’t oats and bread dough doesn’t have as much water as cake batter, so the situation isn’t a perfect corollary.

It will be interesting to hear the results of your experiments.

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Posted: 02 July 2012 02:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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That is really good information to know. Thank you for your explanation.  I didn’t notice gumminess until day 5. Could it be the cake was just past it’s peak?

I have 2 bananas left.

Tomorrow I’ll go to the store before I bake, get instant rolled oats and bake one cake using AP flour and another cake as the control cake using the recipe as written.

I’ll post the results grin

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Posted: 02 July 2012 02:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Flour Girl - 02 July 2012 05:14 AM

I didn’t notice gumminess until day 5. Could it be the cake was just past it’s peak?

I don’t know…..on the rare occasion I make a cake for my own consumption, I cut it into slices and freeze them individually. I have no idea what they’d be like after five days unfrozen.  My guess would have been merely dry.

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Posted: 02 July 2012 11:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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I have never had a cake become dry. I store them either under a glass dome or double wrapped in plastic and foil.

You rarely bake cakes for yourself?

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Posted: 02 July 2012 12:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Flour Girl - 02 July 2012 02:30 PM

You rarely bake cakes for yourself?

I usually only make desserts when I’m taking them someplace where I can leave them.  I see food items in terms of how many miles I need to run in order to burn them off.

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If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

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Posted: 02 July 2012 03:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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CharlesT - 02 July 2012 03:04 PM
Flour Girl - 02 July 2012 02:30 PM

You rarely bake cakes for yourself?

I usually only make desserts when I’m taking them someplace where I can leave them.  I see food items in terms of how many miles I need to run in order to burn them off.

LOL

What about the breads you bake? Do you eat them?

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