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CI Old Fashioned Chocolate Layer Cake
Posted: 04 July 2012 06:54 PM   [ Ignore ]
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The Chocolate Cake Baking continues - This is CI’s Old Fashioned Layer cake as listed on their website.  I almost forgot to get a photo of a slice.  I made half….and it defintely required a glass of milk.  Tastes good but was too dry.  I am surprised even though I did not compare ratios to FW Mom’s, it at a glance appeared similar.  Well next time, I will do Miette’s Tomboy.

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Posted: 04 July 2012 08:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It looks really nice, CRenee!  I must say that you are really convincing me to try the FW Mom’s—how is the flour measured?  My only reservation is that it’s not in grams—and if it’s not…I like to know how the flour is measured so I don’t use too much/too little! 

I made Sweeter Side of Amy’s Bread’s Devil’s Food—it was ok, but I found it was a bit crumbly.  The scraps I pulled off from the crust were moist, but the cake seemed a bit drier.  I did refrigerate while frosting (made a dam/filled with cherries, etc.)  and then froze prior to serving…perhaps that was the cause?

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Posted: 04 July 2012 08:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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You are so kind Sherrie.  I see some poor cutting on the cake.  You know I am not at all good at analyzing the outcomes of cake. 

The original F&W called for 8 x 1.5 inch cake pans.  I have converted it.  Not so sure I have converted it perfectly, but I like the result, perhaps even better.  I really am hooked on wieghing my ingredients.  I can PM you the results.  It is a thin batter, thinner than most chocolate cakes. 

I think when I make it next, I will add some cocoa powder to the chocolate water mix… And, one day I will also try replacing part of the water with milk or buttermilk.

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Posted: 05 July 2012 01:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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CRenee - 04 July 2012 09:54 PM

Tastes good but was too dry.

If the cake were more moist, how would you rank this recipe?

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Posted: 05 July 2012 04:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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which is f w moms recipe!!

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Posted: 05 July 2012 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Looks like it would be perfect with a cold glass of milk! 

Just had a thought of another moist cake to try:  the Bittersweet Cocoa-Almond Genoise.  It is moist because it has lots of butter and some liquid but no flour.  It is dense, not very sweet (but not at all bitter), and has a lot of texture from ground almond flour.  The cake is best with the almonds ground quite fine.

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Posted: 05 July 2012 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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And, one day I will also try replacing part of the water with milk or buttermilk.

Hi, Renee!

Not to say you shouldn’t try the above, but Rose mentions how odd, but how true, it is that chocolate cake made with milk brings out the bitterness in the chocolate, whereas water doesn’t.  But if it does work out that way, maybe that particular edge will go well with whatever filling/frosting you plan.

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Posted: 05 July 2012 03:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Anne in NC - 05 July 2012 01:34 PM

cake made with milk brings out the bitterness in the chocolate

CI says that milk mellows the chocolate, but buttermilk destroys it.  I’m not sure if “mellow” is the opposite to “bitter”, but it’s got to be close!

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Posted: 05 July 2012 08:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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CharlesT - 05 July 2012 04:00 AM
CRenee - 04 July 2012 09:54 PM

Tastes good but was too dry.

If the cake were more moist, how would you rank this recipe?

Hmmm…. Charles I guess I will need to develop a ranking approach, comparison schema….  I like the RHC Devil’s Food better.

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Posted: 05 July 2012 08:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Julie - 05 July 2012 01:33 PM

Looks like it would be perfect with a cold glass of milk! 

Just had a thought of another moist cake to try:  the Bittersweet Cocoa-Almond Genoise.  It is moist because it has lots of butter and some liquid but no flour.  It is dense, not very sweet (but not at all bitter), and has a lot of texture from ground almond flour.  The cake is best with the almonds ground quite fine.

Julie, to me….needing milk is a negative…as I served and shared with my guest I suggested milk.  I will certainly be more careful about baking times, but the cake needs to be able to tolerate 90 seconds too long.  I am sure I am not overbaking by more than that. 

Curious, I wonder if I should get KA’s or someone’s almond flour for the almond genoise.

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Posted: 05 July 2012 08:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Anne in NC - 05 July 2012 01:34 PM

And, one day I will also try replacing part of the water with milk or buttermilk.

Hi, Renee!

Not to say you shouldn’t try the above, but Rose mentions how odd, but how true, it is that chocolate cake made with milk brings out the bitterness in the chocolate, whereas water doesn’t.  But if it does work out that way, maybe that particular edge will go well with whatever filling/frosting you plan.

Thank you, Anne…..I will keep this mind…. I do need to make better notes during and post baking.

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Posted: 05 July 2012 08:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Thank you all for playing along with me….... I basically am playing with food…making chocolate cake for no good reason. 

If anyone tries F&W’s cake, I would love to hear what you think.

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Posted: 05 July 2012 09:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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CRenee - 05 July 2012 11:23 PM

cake needs to be able to tolerate 90 seconds too long.

Agreed, but to me, that suggests that the moistness needs to come primarily from oil, rather than water.  You’d be hard-pressed to evaporate the oil!

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Posted: 05 July 2012 11:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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CharlesT - 05 July 2012 06:18 PM
Anne in NC - 05 July 2012 01:34 PM

cake made with milk brings out the bitterness in the chocolate

CI says that milk mellows the chocolate, but buttermilk destroys it.  I’m not sure if “mellow” is the opposite to “bitter”, but it’s got to be close!

It looks like it’s a bit of both—TCB, p 55, says “milk protein brings out the bitterness in chocolate and ties up flavor.”

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Posted: 06 July 2012 12:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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CharlesT - 06 July 2012 12:58 AM
CRenee - 05 July 2012 11:23 PM
Julie - 05 July 2012 01:33 PM

cake needs to be able to tolerate 90 seconds too long.

Agreed, but to me, that suggests that the moistness needs to come primarily from oil, rather than water.  You’d be hard-pressed to evaporate the oil!

Now see perhaps this is why I like DCP.

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Posted: 08 July 2012 10:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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CRenee - 05 July 2012 11:23 PM

Curious, I wonder if I should get KA’s or someone’s almond flour for the almond genoise.

KAF’s toasted almond flour is the best store-bought I have used, both for flavor and texture.  But it isn’t completely necessary, you can start with sliced unblanched almonds and grind/toast them yourself.  Using a little of the sugar from the recipe to grind the almonds helps, and if you have a lot of patience you can put the ground almonds through a medium strainer and continue to grind the larger pieces, then strain again, etc.

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