Cake iced in Silk Meringue- questions
Posted: 21 September 2012 09:08 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Should a cake iced in Silk meringue be taken out of the fridge to come to room temp before serving like other meringues?  If so, how far ahead to take it out of fridge?  It will have a pastry filling as well…. Can this icing go on a sponge cake?  Be under a chocolate collar?

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Posted: 21 September 2012 11:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi, Pat!

I’d bring it to room temp for its ultimate fluffiness, although it is also fabulous cold.

If it’s 2 layers, I like to give 6 hours, and lean toward 7 more than 5, if you have to go one way or the other.  It’s amazing how long a cake stays cold in the middle.  If you take it out too early and it’s still cold, as soon as everyone’s done with their cold piece, the cake miraculously comes to it’s room temp perfection of moistness, which will be known only to the late comers (and seconds-ers).

If it’s 1 layer, you can get away with 3.

It can still sit out all day after that, even with pastry filling.  At least I’ve never had problems or any sick people!!  And, don’t forget, during it’s coming to room temp, it’s basically cold, so that time doesn’t really count.

I sometimes get paranoid and lean toward less, rather than more, time, because I worry about it keeping, and I always regret it.  The cakes always keep great, but it’s always a drag when they are not total room temperature when cutting.  Also, they take longer to come to room temp if they’re in a covered carrier, so take the lid off.  I usually let the lid be just sort of askew for an hour or so so it’s not shocked by the change, then I take the lid off. 

Now I get up in the middle of the night if need be.  It’s really worth it!

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Posted: 22 September 2012 09:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Pat - 22 September 2012 12:08 AM

Can this icing go on a sponge cake?  Be under a chocolate collar?

Yes and yes smile

You’ve referred to it as a meringue, but I just wanted to point you in the right direction:  it’s a buttercream and compared to a meringue is more dense. Compared to other buttercreams it has a custard undertone to the flavor and a bit of lightness.  The caramel and its variations (choc praline, burnt orange) are my all-time favorite buttercreams, with the possible exception of the white chocolate vanilla bean buttercream in Rose’s Heavenly Cakes (Golden Dream wedding cake).

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