Looking for Non-Frankenwheat
Posted: 30 October 2012 04:26 PM   [ Ignore ]
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In the wake of all the brouhaha which ensued from the book “Wheatbelly”, I have been exploring flour origins in the U.S. What I understand is that most of the wheat grown here is of what has been dubbed the “Frankenwheat” variety, a dwarf hybrid that has added chromosomes turning it into a carb rich, allergy-producing problem.

As someone who has had to give up a beloved baking business because I too was diagnosed with a wheat allergy, I am hoping to find wheat and/or flour that is not the dwarf type. I may have been successful with Wheat Montana. I talked with this third generational family business and they feel they have what I’m looking for.

Has anyone else out there also been researching this issue? And if so, what have you found? I also looked into getting French grown flour for baking breads, but that seems well-nigh impossible. All comments welcome!

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Posted: 31 October 2012 11:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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These people produce impeccable products.

http://www.bluebirdgrainfarms.com/

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Posted: 01 November 2012 10:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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There are several ancient varieties of wheat that are increasingly available, spelt and durum.  And for bread there is also rye.  Perhaps those will fit the bill?

I haven’t read Wheat Belly and don’t know what other arguments he puts forth other than modern cultivars being inferior nutritionally, but there are other areas of valid research into grain nutrition that you may be interested in.  Sprouting wheat and grains neutralizes phytic acid and makes the minerals more bioavailable and the grains more digestible, and stone-grinding often processes flours at lower temperatures, preserving beneficial enzyme activity.

Lepicerie.com sells several imported French flours.

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Posted: 01 November 2012 10:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Gene, did you ever bake more bread with Emmer flour?  I love it for cold wheat salads and pilaf/risotto-type dishes, but the one loaf of bread I made with it tasted sort of funny, and I haven’t yet tried to improve upon that.

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Posted: 02 November 2012 06:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I must confess that I only made two batches with the emmer. I love the flavor but the texture was heavy. I never got around to developing/adapting a recipe that satisfied me. When my emmer flour ran out I convinced myself that the expense wasn’t justified.

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