Corn syrup?
Posted: 25 July 2008 07:40 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi everyone,

This is me all the way from Norway. A small but incredibly beautiful country in the north of Europe.

Well I am line, hook and sinker into the cake bible. Which I bougt because I want to start a wedding cake business.

I made the yellowcake, and it was wonderful. WIth neoclassic buttercream.

No one in Norway is familiar with the buttery taste, so everyone was a little sceptical. However i mixed it with raspberry jam and fresh one as well. SO on the whole, it was success!

THE QUESTION is:

There is no such thing as corn syrup in Norway. What is it interchangeable with? Regular light syrup (made with sugar)???

PLEASE HELP grin)

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Posted: 25 July 2008 09:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I am in the UK and we do not have corn syrup here but we do have Tate & Lyle’s Golden Syrup, which can be used instead of corn syrup, in fact it is said to be better !
Do you have it in Norway?  If so I think you will be able to substitute it for the corn syrup, I’m sorry I don’t know of any other substitute but perhaps someone else will be able to help.  There is always help on this site! grin

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Posted: 26 July 2008 04:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I liked this explanation…

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-corn-syrup.htm

And with this explanation from Lyle’s

How is Lyle’s Golden Syrup made?

Sugar syrup is acidified so that the sucrose inverts.  Quite simply, the sucrose sugar molecule splits in half to give glucose and fructose sugars.  This inverted syrup is blended back with the original syrup to give a partially inverted syrup.  The secret of Lyle’s Golden Syrup is the final blend of sucrose, glucose and fructose which allows the syrup to be so thick and velvety without crystallizing.

We can infer that Lyle’s would be a good substitute for corn syrup. What you want is the glucose-fructose sugars. If you can’t find Lyle’s or Karo or a Norwegian equivalent I don’t know what to recommend. I think just making a syrup from sucrose would be too prone to crystallize in most recipes.

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Posted: 26 July 2008 06:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I just asked a friend from the Netherlands - she said they don’t use corn syrup or molasses in home baking.  She said there is a different kind of syrup which is thicker, heavier, which is sometimes used in baking.  I’ll try to find out what it’s called.

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Posted: 26 July 2008 07:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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More research reveals…

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-inverted-sugar-syrup.htm

Inverted sugar syrup is often made by using basic sugar syrup, also called simple syrup, which is a mix of water and sugar that is slowly cooked and then boiled for about a minute to produce liquid syrup. Sugar syrup can be made in varying degrees of thickness, so recipes for proportions of sugar to water will differ. To create inverted sugar syrup, you add an acid to simple syrup, in order to start the inversion process that will recompose the chemicals of sugar into their simpler component forms of glucose and fructose.

I haven’t found a recommendation for how much acid you need to add. Probably you could add small amounts and keep tasting the syrup. When the syrup starts tasting acidic then you know that the all of the sucrose has been converted.

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Posted: 26 July 2008 07:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Patrincia - 26 July 2008 09:50 PM

I just asked a friend from the Netherlands - she said they don’t use corn syrup or molasses in home baking.  She said there is a different kind of syrup which is thicker, heavier, which is sometimes used in baking.  I’ll try to find out what it’s called.

Here it is - it’s called stroop

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/24/35627680_3f09d1db70.jpg?v=0

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Posted: 27 July 2008 11:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Hello——I am in the U.S., but I only use Lyle’s in place of “corn syrup,” and I have great success!

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Posted: 28 July 2008 03:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Sorry my chemistry is off. I consulted a friend and he thinks the acid acts as a catalyst. So my theory of adding acid a bit at a time is hooey. Heat and a dilute acid are all that are required. Probably best find some Lyle’s!

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Posted: 28 July 2008 01:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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you could always get a candy thermometer and make the classic buttercream, then you can try the mousseline buttercream which is the absolute best. the classic is just as easy as the neoclassic and there is no wondering about the temp of the hot sugar. PLUS you don’t have to rely on having that extra ingredient in the pantry.

jen

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Posted: 28 July 2008 04:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Excellent research guys.  Thanks for sharing.

Jen, I feel with you regarding avoiding the extra ingredient in the pantry.  Great suggestion on making the mousseline which doesn’t use corn syrup.  Buttercreams that call for corn syrup are most popular as shortcuts and easier to execute frostings (corn syrup doesn’t give you crystallization problems).

If you still prefer a rich buttercream with egg yolks, add creme anglaise to your mousseline, that is called the silk meringue buttercream.

I also believe that high fructose corn syrup is bad for your health!

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Posted: 28 July 2008 09:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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hectorwong - 28 July 2008 07:28 PM

I also believe that high fructose corn syrup is bad for your health!

That certainly seems to be the opinion of many experts!

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Posted: 08 April 2014 03:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I live in the Netherlands and have found light corn syrup in a ‘toko’ (asian supermarket, which often also carry a line of American products). I’ve never tried substituting corn syrup with golden syrup or good old fashioned dutch ‘stroop’, so I don’t know if it’s necessary to go and seek out a toko, but I just thought I’d let people know smile

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