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Mousilline cream without any alcohol?
Posted: 26 July 2008 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Can I make a mousiline cream without any liqour?? I and most of my friend don’t consume alcohol at all gulp

And what do I substitute it with?

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Posted: 26 July 2008 06:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I have used this recipe without alcohol, and it’s still wonderful.  A good vanilla makes a delightful substitute.

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Posted: 26 July 2008 06:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Agreed - I make it this way all the time.  I just add pure vanilla extract to taste - it’s wonderful!!!!!

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Posted: 26 July 2008 07:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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thanks for reply!!

But what about the amount of fluid which then is taken away from the cream. Is the cream the consistency it should be?

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Posted: 26 July 2008 07:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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fromNorway - 26 July 2008 10:06 PM

thanks for reply!!

But what about the amount of fluid which then is taken away from the cream. Is the cream the consistency it should be?

Not to worry - the consistency will be perfect smile.

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Posted: 26 July 2008 07:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks a lot!  cheese

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Posted: 28 July 2008 09:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I would replace the alcohol with half the amount in simple syrup and a bit of vanilla.

See, the recipe calls for liqueurs, which indeed are near 50% simple syrup.  Vanilla is near 100% pure alcohol.  I know now because I am making my own liqueurs and my own vanilla.

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Posted: 28 July 2008 09:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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With or without simple syrup - it works smile.

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Posted: 29 July 2008 05:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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If you want mousseline to be as smooth as fondant or as my a-DORA-ble cake, you must use the recommended amount of liqueur.  Alcohol finalizes the perfect emulsification of the mousseline thus complete smoothness!

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/a-DORA-ble.html

http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/photos/Dora - 1.jpg

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http://www.hectorwong.com/roselevy/photos/Dora - 2.jpg

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Posted: 29 July 2008 05:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Hector,

Your cake is..adoreable indeed!!

I am sure the alcohol is there for a reason besides the taste, and taking it away would make some differnce.

The problem as mentioned above is that I do not consume alcohol at all :-(

But thanks for the help everyone!!

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Posted: 29 July 2008 07:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I don’t use alcohol in our buttercream (because I don’t know whether children are consuming the cake or not and would rather be safe).  If you add some melted white chocolate (high quality white chocolate), the additional fat will help with getting a perfectly smooth surface.  Most of the time, the smoothness of the finished buttercream has more to do with technique than the recipe.  Many bakers in New York use a Swiss Meringue buttercream, which contains no alcohol, and get a flawless finish that defies description!  A swiss meringue buttercream uses egg whites and superfine sugar heated over simmering water to a temp of 160, then it is beaten until the volume increases by double or triple, and then softened butter is added.  That is the difference between Swiss Meringue and Italian Meringue buttercream - one heats the sugar and whites while the other uses a hot syrup.  Since it doesn’t call for alcohol, and produces similiar results, maybe that’s an option for you?

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Posted: 29 July 2008 12:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I love and admire you Hector, but I beg to differ.  I can get results just as smooth without adding the alcohol.  I will say this though, there are 3 flavor carriers which consist of Fat, Alcohol, and Stock - so I’m sure the flavor is indeed enhanced with the addition of alcohol.

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Posted: 29 July 2008 01:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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technically speaking, alcohol break fat into loose molecules.  this makes the fat finelly mix with other ingredients thus making things well mixed and in perfect suspension.  this is part of emulsification.

alcohol is extremelly and fastly volatile, it evaporates in the air leaving you only the flavor carried in the liqueur.  vanilla extract is near 100 percent alcohol so you know.

how about, use no alcohol for filling the layers, the alcohol wouldn’t fully evaporate because is is covered.  but for frosting and pipind use alcohol which will evaporate by the time you eat the cake.

calculate the alcohol ratio in the mousseline, NOBODY will get drunk, nor sick, nor red, nor your cake considered an alcoholic beverage!  nor notice in fact.

again, the key is allowing your cake to breath away.  my cakes with syrup an alcohol sit for at least 1 day prior to serving.

many pastry shops and restaurants use alcohol, can you notice?  cointreu on whipped cream, meyers rum on biscuit cake and tropical desserts, marsala on tiramisu, cr?me de casis on mont blanc creame, vodka on tomato pasta sauce.

regarding swiss meringue bc, it is great tasting and comparable and easier to execute, but not as temperature resistant as italian meringue bc.  sugar doesn’t get heated to firm level on swiss.  the structure on the italian meringue bc comes from the webbing filaments of the heated firm sugar.

I wonder if you can make it with cotton candy, powdered whites, and butter?

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Posted: 29 July 2008 04:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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I personally do not have anything against the use of alcohol, but I have to respect that several family members cannot have it around, therefore we have a no-alcohol policy in our home.  I have managed to get small amounts from friends for this or that, but I cannot keep bottles in the house.

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Posted: 29 July 2008 08:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Hey NOrway,

As already mentioned, the actual alcohol isn’t present in the frosting when you finally eat it. I have never added it. As Patrincia does, I add a tsp of vanilla (or more) of vanilla. If the alcohol was required to make the frosting a success then chocolate mousseline and other flavors wouldn’t work. I’m no scientist, (nor do I play one on TV) but that’s the way my logic works.

I do think the vanilla or some other flavor is necessary to bring out the sweetness of the sugar, which can be overwhelmed by the butter.

jen

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Posted: 29 July 2008 11:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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hectorwong - 29 July 2008 04:36 PM

I wonder if you can make it with cotton candy, powdered whites, and butter?

Hmmm.  Sounds like edible fiberglass.  Wrap the cotton candy on there and slather on the meringue whipped with butter.  I don’t think so.

I was trying to find the science behind the different ways of adding sugar to meringues and how they differ when I came across this link. http://www.brightcove.tv/title.jsp?title=1541138431 It’s the Cakelove guy demonstrating the techniques behind italian meringue.  He sure makes it look easy.  I just noticed;  If you watch the clock on the wall behind him, he produces this batch (all be it a small batch) in just about 20 minutes start to finish.  He only beats it about 5 minutes before adding the butter, so whether it cooled really quickly, because of the small volume, or he’s not that worried about it being too warm.  It seems to take forever to cool for me.  Oh, and check out the shimmying KitchenAid.  Yet that syrup still goes right in.  Entertaining and informative.  But not a word about the role of the hot syrup, other than to kill any bacteria. 

So, now I’m just going to tell you what I think.* (DISCLAIMER: all opinions are based on my best educated assumptions as well as extremely thorough research on the subject.(at least the first 3 or so pages on the Google search results, or 30 minutes, or when I get bored, whichever comes first.)  My opinions are not to be used as the basis for scientific research, as they could be misguided or just completely wrong.  No wagering, please.)

I’m sure there is some egg white coagulation going on, as the hot syrup certainly cooks something on contact. 
We also know that if you are heating the syrup to the hard ball stage, it would form a . . . well, hard ball if you left it to sit. 
But we don’t. 
We pour it in a little tiny stream, or quick globs which are then spun around at great speed and distribute it around our lovely air bubbles encased in our coagulated egg protien.  So, I guess you could imagine adding a thin layer of hardened sugar syrup to that mix and it certainly helps stabilize the whole mass. 

Since the sugar shouldn’t melt until it reaches well above any humanly tolerable room temperature—(did you know that there is a MSDS - Material Data Safety Sheet - for sugar? You’ll be happy to know that they state “Thought to present no health hazard. ” under the Personal Protection section.  That’s comforting.—I’m sure that that helps with the stability that you all admire so much.  It must provide a scaffolding of sorts to keep the fat from sliding about when it is exposed to temperatures above its melting point.

So.  I don’t think cotton candy would work.  Unless the fibers are constructed within the structure, as they are when we whip in the hot syrup. 

That’s my theory an’ I’m stickin’ to it.

Semi-Scientifically yours,

JennyBee

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