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bundt cakes, glazes and fillings
Posted: 25 January 2013 05:59 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello everyone,

I’m new to this forum, but I’ve always loved to bake.  Lately I’ve become very enthusiastic about bundt cakes.  It was the beautiful tins that first attracted me but now I’m really enthusiastic about the cakes too!  I’ve been experimenting over the last 6 months and have discovered many of my favourite recipes work very well, and of course there is the Internet…! 

My queries are about glazes and fillings, because I’m aware that, for many of the people for whom I cook, icing/frosting and gooey fillings are really the point of cakes!  Without capitulating to them entirely I’d like any tips from your amazing collective wisdom about glazes and fillings.

Glazes: On my own I’ve discovered that ordinary ganache, just the kind that is equal quantities of double or whipping cream, and good plain chocolate (50-70% cocoa solids works well), works brilliantly made in a large quantity so a cold bundt can be covered in a single pour.  The excess can be reused by the way.  The detail is captured beautifully, e.g. using the old Nordic Ware Fiesta tin,  Obviously this could also be flavoured in many ways so long as ratios were roughly maintained.  Q: Has anyone tried this with white chocolate?  White chocolate tends to remain very solid even when supposedly melted - so should more liquid be added?  Or maybe a cheaper type of white chocolate?  (I used Green & Black’s).

I’ve also found a gorgeous photo on a different forum of a Nordic ware ‘fleur de lis’ cake covered in a somewhat different chocolate glaze, one that calls for 8 oz choc, 6 oz butter and a T of golden syrup or corn syrup, and flavouring.  I’m sure this would work well too.

For non-chocolate glazes, I use around 1 1/2 to 2 c icing sugar mixed to runny consistency with appropriate booze, then brush it on - also to a cold cake, unless I want to moisten the cake a bit, in which case I do it when the cake is warm.  I put the cake on a cooling rack set on a flat biscuit tin, the kind with a very narrow raised edge, and then scrape the drip back into the bowl and re-apply it, doing this again and again til it’s all used.

What I tend to try and avoid, is the ‘drip’ type of glaze, because to me, this obscures the whole point of thesse wonderful tins, which is the detail of the design.  But maybe if I brushed these on (I’m thinking of glazes with buttermilk in, etc), they’d work well?  What do you all think?

Fillings: So far I’ve only tried a ‘cheesecake’ type filling, for a chocolate gingerbread cake, which was fine, but a bit solid.  I’m keen to try a Nigella recipe which has a filling of flour, golden syrup, flavouring and nuts.  Does anyone have any advice about devising fillings?  I’ve seen many for fruit which involve fake-type ingredients and I don’t want to go down that route.  Would, say, blueberries mixed with a bit of syrup and flour work?  Has anyone experimented?  Questions, questions!  I hope you can help.  I do love the bundts and want to make them taste and appeal as much as I possibly can, without getting into synthetic ingredients and flavours!

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Posted: 25 January 2013 09:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi, EAG, and welcome!!!!

Rose has a lovely almond-pear filled bundt cake in RHC (“Swedish Pear and Amond Cream Cake” in Rose’s Heavenly Cakes), which I have not made, but which I hear is amazing.  Its technique might be able to be adapted to other cakes:  You fill the pan, make a 1/4” depression in the middle around the cake and put the almond cream (a sort of frangipine-like filling) in it, then you put the pear slices on it.  All of this sinks to near the bottom of the cake while baking, making it a filling.

Also, it looks like the chocolate/butter/golden syrup simply amounts to a ganache—basically 50% chocolate, 50% “other/fat/liquid.”  Here you have 8oz chocolate, 6oz butter and (likely) 2 oz golden syrup, so that’s why it would work, essentially, like your 50-50 ganache.  You can also make a lovely ganache with coconut milk—I often put the can in the fridge overnight and just heat up the the “solid” top for my cream.

Now, I have a question for you!  What is the final texture of the glaze below:

For non-chocolate glazes, I use around 1 1/2 to 2 c icing sugar mixed to runny consistency with appropriate booze, then brush it on - also to a cold cake, unless I want to moisten the cake a bit, in which case I do it when the cake is warm.  I put the cake on a cooling rack set on a flat biscuit tin, the kind with a very narrow raised edge, and then scrape the drip back into the bowl and re-apply it, doing this again and again til it?s all used.

I used to have an orange cake for my birthday as a child—I don’t know what it was, but it was baked in a tube pan, and it had a (no doubt) powdered sugar orange glaze that was (probably) made like yours above, but with orange juice instead of booze.  It was a bit “crispy”, like the coating on a glazed donut.  Is this what yours is like?  I’d love to recreate this cake, except, perhaps, with homemade orangettes in the batter itself.

Welcome again, and I hope you get lots of answers from avid bundters!!!!!

—ak

p.s.  Given the right pan, appearance-wise, I think you could probably torte a bundt into 3 layers and fill it like any “normal” cake.

l.m.n.o.p.  The “Baked” cookbook guys do a LOT of bundt cakes.  I have found their recipes to be quite reliable and popular, although I haven’t made any of their bundt cakes.

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Posted: 25 January 2013 11:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi eag…Thanks for posting. I have learned a lot about glazes from your post.I have always brushed or dripped my glazes. I am going to try your method of pouring the glaze on a cold cake.

Rose has several excellent cakes baked in bundt pans in her book, “Rose’s Heavenly Cakes”. In her Chocolate Streusel Chocolate Cake, Rose uses a filling made of light Muscovado sugar, cocoa powder and cinnamon. I feel that cake would do well with a chocolate glaze. There are several other bundt cakes in that book which yield excellent results.

If you don’t have that book you can search for it on Amazon, scroll down the page and view the 3 recipes Rose has posted. One of the recipes is her Whipped Cream Cake which is baked in a bundt pan. I make a glaze of icing sugar, heavy cream and vanilla for that cake. Everyone always wants the recipe after tasting this cake ... but I never give it out.

I hope to see pics of your cakes in the future,

flourgirl

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Posted: 25 January 2013 01:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hello both,

How wonderful to get such speedy responses!

Anne in NC, yes, I think the icing sugar-liquid glaze, when applied to cold cakes, is exactly like the one that used to be on yeast donuts.  It’s hard to give quantities of liquid though, I need to be more precise.  I think it’s 1-2 T of liquid to 4 oz of icing sugar (c 1 1/2 cups).  I saw a posting to a UK food blog where the lady made a LARGE amount - with a pound of icing sugar I think or even more - and using lemon juice? (I think) mixed it to pouring consistency and then poured it all over the cold bundt, in one pour, and then sprayed silver cake spray all over it - awesome!  I mean a bit blingy but very effective, given it was for a Christmas fayre.  It was the Nordic ware Tree bundt, so the effect was of snowy trees in moonlight!  For orange glaze, just use good old orange juice - I never use any water any more, in spite of what recipes say.  Or orange juice mixed with orange liqueur.  You might find you need several coats brushed on, but if the cake is very cold it definitely forms a thin crust almost immediately.  If you used the large quantity-pour method you’d probably be able to pour twice to make that crackly glaze just a bit thicker.  I just remembered, a propos of losing detail with glazes, the beauty of doing it this way is you can really thin it and apply several coats thus controlling loss of detail.  I’ve even done this with the wee cakes from the Nordic Ware Teacakes pan, the one a lot of people complain doesn’t keep detail if you glaze, and it works perfectly.  You can also save leftover glaze for quite a while in a closed container in the fridge though you might need to ‘melt’ it in the microwave.

Our current cake is an olive oil-sherry poundcake (Alice Medrich) with an icing sugar-sherry glaze brushed on - really delicious.  Baked in the Wilton Cascade pan.  I’d love to send a picture but I don’t know how.

Flourgirl and Anne, I have ordered the Heavenly Cakes book.  Anne, I am really excited about the idea of using frangipane as a base for a filling.  It’s so good with any fruit really, and so easy to mix up.  I will tell you how I get on.  I’m thinking homemade raspberry jam and frangipane inside a lemon poundcake-type bundt - an inside-out Bakewell tart so to speak! 

Flourgirl, I forgot to say that I did use double the usual ganache recipe - that is I used a pound of chocolate and a pint of cream.  The beauty of it is that you can go right ahead and use what flows off the cake so long as you put the cake on a rack with a tray underneath to catch the pour.  You just shovel it back in the bowl using a kid cheater, you can warm it up again if it starts congealing, save it to use for layering cakes, or making truffles, etc.  Anne, I think you are right that the other chocolate glaze would work just the same way, I’m guessing it might end up harder, more like the coating on a chocolate.

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Posted: 25 January 2013 01:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Hello both,

How wonderful to get such speedy responses!

Anne in NC, yes, I think the icing sugar-liquid glaze, when applied to cold cakes, is exactly like the one that used to be on yeast donuts.  It’s hard to give quantities of liquid though, I need to be more precise.  I think it’s 1-2 T of liquid to 4 oz of icing sugar (c 1 1/2 cups).  I saw a posting to a UK food blog where the lady made a LARGE amount - with a pound of icing sugar I think or even more - and using lemon juice? (I think) mixed it to pouring consistency and then poured it all over the cold bundt, in one pour, and then sprayed silver cake spray all over it - awesome!  I mean a bit blingy but very effective, given it was for a Christmas fayre.  It was the Nordic ware Tree bundt, so the effect was of snowy trees in moonlight!  For orange glaze, just use good old orange juice - I never use any water any more, in spite of what recipes say.  Or orange juice mixed with orange liqueur.  You might find you need several coats brushed on, but if the cake is very cold it definitely forms a thin crust almost immediately.  If you used the large quantity-pour method you’d probably be able to pour twice to make that crackly glaze just a bit thicker. 

Our current cake is an olive oil-sherry poundcake (Alice Medrich) with an icing sugar-sherry glaze brushed on - really delicious.  Baked in the Wilton Cascade pan.  I have tried to attach a picture.  Unfortunately I forgot to take one of the chocolate ganache-glazed one.

Flourgirl and Anne, I have ordered the Heavenly Cakes book.  Anne, I am really excited about the idea of using frangipane as a base for a filling.  It’s so good with any fruit really, and so easy to mix up.  I will tell you how I get on.  I’m thinking homemade raspberry jam and frangipane inside a lemon poundcake-type bundt - an inside-out Bakewell tart so to speak!  Or the dreaded blueberry bundt with the berries inside, mixed with frangipane, instead of sticking to the bottom…  Flourgirl your cream glaze sounds divine, I wonder if that too could be made in a large quantity and poured to cover whole cake?

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Posted: 25 January 2013 02:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks, eag!

Your cake is beautiful! 

You will love Heavenly Cakes.  It’s a fabulous book.  Most of the round butter/oil layers in there can be baked in bundt pans by just adjusting the quantity of batter (but not necessarily vice versa).

As a side note, re the frangipine, I believe the filling is frangipine-LIKE, but a bit creamier, so FWIW—you will see it in the book!

If you’re dying for another book, you might also like TCB (The Cake Bible), which deals more with individual components, and thus has a very large variety of them.  That said, TCB also has “composed cakes” made from the components in the book.  RHC uses many of the TCB components in its cakes (which are all “composed” cakes), but it also has new recipes and updated techniques.  And, of course, you can mix and match at will!

That lemon cake sounds fabulous (with the spray)!  Your lemon cake idea sounds fabulous, as well.

Thanks for the orange glaze tips!!!

—ak

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Posted: 25 January 2013 05:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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That’s a one lovely cake Eag, welcome to the forum!

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Posted: 25 January 2013 07:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Thank you Eag for all the info on glazes.  I will come back to this post for reference.  The cake is pretty.  And, you will definitely love Rose’s Heavenly Cakes.  Please do post a pic of what you bake.

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Posted: 27 January 2013 12:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I’m glad you ordered RHC! I’m sure you will love it.

As CRenee said, please post pics!

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Posted: 07 February 2013 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Hello all,

Sorry it took so long to get back to you.

I have now got ‘Heavenly Cakes’ and it is full of interesting information relevant to bundts!  I particularly like the new (to me) basic mixing technique.  Having said that I have not yet tried it, but am planning to very soon.  It takes courage to try completely new techniques like this, but if I’m happy with it, it will be a great breakthrough as I do find the trad. creaming etc quite time-consuming and messy.

I have however done a single-pour (well, actually double-pour!) chocolate glaze in the meantime.  A friend requested coconut and chocolate for a birthday cake.  So I found a lovely recipe on the internet for a ‘coconut raspberry bundt cake’, on the ‘buttercream blondie’ blog.  I tweaked it a bit and did my pour.  I hope the results will show below!  The cake was delicious but quite a firm texture, whereas I think most of us expect coconut cake to be quite fluffy.  So next time I will beat the egg whites and fold them in, which is what I always do for my usual coconut layer cake - from good old Fannie Farmer, c 1978!

I’ve also made several other bundts in the meantime.  Including some mini-bundts from a great pan I just bought on ebay, mini versions of the excellent ‘Fiesta’ bundt pan.  I’ve tried to attach that picture too, hope it works.  Not quite sure about sizes.  That picture shows them in final stages of ordinary brushed-on glaze.  I made them with my favourite gingerbread recipe, gleaned about 30 years ago from a pal, and brushed them with an icing sugar-spiced rum glaze.  A bit sweet for my taste but my audience loved them!

One thing that I’ve discovered about bundts is that putting them under a bell or cake dome overnight works wonders, the taste and texture seem greatly improved.

So - onward and upward!  I’m really looking forward to trying some ‘Rose’ cakes! Actually I already have now that I think of it, I did Rose’s genoise in my ‘star’ bundt pan a while back and it worked brilliantly.  (That was a recipe she had posted on the internet.)  Discovering that sponges like that can be baked in fancy bundt pans was a real step forward, as they are so delicious soaked in syrup and filled with cream and fruit - yum!  And yet so decorative too.

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Posted: 07 February 2013 03:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Your cakes and glazes look nice and tasty!  Enjoy RHC- I just made the Karmel cake in a (6c) bundt pan and the crust is just as described, very fine, smooth and beautiful.  smile

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Posted: 08 February 2013 05:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Ah yes - that was one of the ones that interested me!  Now I will have to try it out, so good to know that you have and it works bundtifully (so to speak!).

I wondered about doing what some people do with bundt cakes, sprinkling greased bundt tin with sugar, for that recipe.  I did that once with another bundt with demerara sugar (which I think is the same as ‘turbinado’) and I liked it.  But it remained rather crunchy, which my husband didn’t like so much.  Interesting that it doesn’t melt though maybe finer sugar would.

I’ve attached a slightly better picture of the chocolate-glazed bundt.  I think I’ll try the chocolate-butter glaze next time as I think it would be a bit thinner and thus might get the detail a bit more crisply.  I’m thinking also about Rose’s recipe for glaze, the one with gelatin in, though actually I’m not sure that would be necessary for this type of application, it would be a fair bit more work. 

The fleur de lis is a good pan for this glaze and I think two of the kaiser ones I’ve gotten recently would be also, the ‘safir’ and one with low-relief stylised tulips.  I haven’t used them yet! I don’t think e.g. the ‘blossom’ one from Nordic would work so well, or the wonderful swirly Nordic one (Heritage?) and probably not the Bavaria, though that might be ok.

Also, has anyone had any experience using white chocolate in a chocolate glaze?  I think it would be spectacular if it can be done, but white chocolate is so thick when melted!  I think I asked about this before.

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Posted: 08 February 2013 12:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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eag - 08 February 2013 09:56 AM

I wondered about doing what some people do with bundt cakes, sprinkling greased bundt tin with sugar, for that recipe.  I did that once with another bundt with demerara sugar (which I think is the same as ‘turbinado’) and I liked it.  But it remained rather crunchy, which my husband didn’t like so much.  Interesting that it doesn’t melt though maybe finer sugar would.

This is interesting- do you mean that you grease the pan, then coat it with sugar instead of flour?  Did it release from the pan or did it stick?

I’ve attached a slightly better picture of the chocolate-glazed bundt.

  Looks nice!

I think I’ll try the chocolate-butter glaze next time as I think it would be a bit thinner and thus might get the detail a bit more crisply.

  That one, if I remember correctly, sets up a bit firm.  I like it that way, but just wanted to point it out so your expectations would be on-target.

I’m thinking also about Rose’s recipe for glaze, the one with gelatin in, though actually I’m not sure that would be necessary for this type of application

The reason to use that one is for the shine.  If an uber-glossy, mirror-like shine isn’t the goal, then there’s no reason to go with that option.  It does not set up hard/firm like the choc butter glaze.

Also, has anyone had any experience using white chocolate in a chocolate glaze?  I think it would be spectacular if it can be done, but white chocolate is so thick when melted!

  It would be a simple thing to make a glaze by melting white chocolate with either oil or cream.  I find that using oil keeps it soft, it won’t set up hard even if you don’t use too much.  With cream, you need to use enough to prevent seizing.

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Posted: 11 February 2013 12:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Julie - 08 February 2013 04:10 PM
eag - 08 February 2013 09:56 AM

I wondered about doing what some people do with bundt cakes, sprinkling greased bundt tin with sugar, for that recipe.  I did that once with another bundt with demerara sugar (which I think is the same as ‘turbinado’) and I liked it.  But it remained rather crunchy, which my husband didn’t like so much.  Interesting that it doesn’t melt though maybe finer sugar would.

This is interesting- do you mean that you grease the pan, then coat it with sugar instead of flour?  Did it release from the pan or did it stick?

Yes, though I sprinkled it on top of the coating of ‘pan goo’ which is my usual way of greasing tins and that has flour in it.  It did release just fine with the sugar - surprising isn’t it?  But the sugar doesn’t really melt which was also a surprise.  Coating tins with sugar is a continental thing I think.  Here in the UK grease and flour is the usual, or a nonstick spray.

Also, has anyone had any experience using white chocolate in a chocolate glaze?  I think it would be spectacular if it can be done, but white chocolate is so thick when melted!

  It would be a simple thing to make a glaze by melting white chocolate with either oil or cream.  I find that using oil keeps it soft, it won’t set up hard even if you don’t use too much.  With cream, you need to use enough to prevent seizing.

Many thanks for those tips.  I’m planning a coconut-white chocolate extravaganza in the next day or so.

Latest bundt cake was in one of the Kaisercast tins, the ‘Flora’.  Beautiful tins - but BIGGG!  Like the big Nordic platinum one.  It was a great recipe for ‘Rumtopf’ bundt - I just happen to have some rumtopf.  The cake is very alcoholic and moist and was quite easy to make too, an oil cake.  It didn’t really fill the tin though, so the bottom rung of the design got left out. 

I do find sizes difficult to calculate. I’ve used the fleu de lis tin many times but that last cake - the one with the chocolate ganache glaze - was the first one where the cake really filled the pan!  I find if I follow guidelines about filling 3/4 full, if there is a bottom round of design it never gets included!  I now fill them almost to the top, but sometimes that requires a big recipe.  I’m learning to calculate from the amount of flour and amount of additional ingredients though.

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Posted: 02 March 2013 03:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I love how your cakes came out eag! And that mini Fest pan is too cute! Which glaze are you using on the mini bundts?

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Posted: 02 March 2013 03:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Julie - 07 February 2013 07:05 PM

Your cakes and glazes look nice and tasty!  Enjoy RHC- I just made the Karmel cake in a (6c) bundt pan and the crust is just as described, very fine, smooth and beautiful.  smile

I never thought to bake that cake in a Bundt. . I have got to try it. Did the recipe need to be adjusted?

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