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bundt cakes, glazes and fillings
Posted: 29 April 2013 01:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 106 ]
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eag - 28 April 2013 06:50 AM

I hope you both don’t mind me joining in.  Just to say, I think you have sold me on this new book, which I’d never heard of!  So it’s off to amazon now wink

Good! It’s a really good book to own. I think it would make anyone a better bake just by following his techniques.

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Posted: 29 April 2013 01:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 107 ]
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eag - 28 April 2013 04:15 PM

Flourgirl, I’m really interested that you go for recipes without butter - and cream also?  Because my husband is thinking he needs to cut down even more on things that might be harmful. I find myself liking cakes made with olive oil more and more.  It just seems to work so well.  I’m definitely wanting to try both your recipes.

*Though the internet did gift me a wondrous gooey marshmallow buttercream recipe involving marshmallow fluff - I don’t usually go in for that sort of thing but for coconut layer cake it does seem appropriate.

I wish my husband felt the way your husband does.

I was forced to cut down when I went for a cholesterol test last year. My total cholesterol was 257. That is a lot for me. I am only 110 pounds and very careful about what I eat. The men in my family who are over 6 feet tall, over 200 pounds and eat bacon cheeseburgers with mayo on the buns have lower cholesterol than I.

I stopped all intake of butter, meat and high fat dairy.  I put olive oil on my bread in place of butter. I love butter but I got to really like the olive oil on bread too. I gave-up butter cakes. I only eat cakes made with oil and have no more than 2 eggs per cake. 

This year I went for a re-test of my cholesterol. My cholesterol dropped from 257 to 191 in 1 year. That is better than I could have done on meds.

I followed this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Cholesterol-Down-Simple-Weeks—Without-Prescription/dp/0307339114/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1367209556&sr=1-1&keywords=cholesterol+down

You don’t have to read the science if you don’t want. You can skip to the steps suggested.

I still make butter cakes for my family but I make a separate cake for me. They have theirs and mine too wink

This morning I made a sweet potato cake. It is an oil cake and uses 2 eggs.  It is made in a bundt pan.  It has pecans in the batter and is glazed twice with a rum-orange juice-sugar glaze. The recipes are in volume measurements. I used 140g flour per cup and it turned out perfect.  A picture is below.

The recipe is from this book. I just got the book and there are several recipes which look like they would work for me.

http://www.amazon.com/Sweet-Melissa-Baking-Book-Everyones/dp/0670018740/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1367210038&sr=1-1&keywords=sweet+melissa+baking+book

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Posted: 29 April 2013 12:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 108 ]
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I came across this article. It has 32 pictures and recipes for bundt cakes. They look gooood!

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/28/bundt-cake-recipes-minis_n_2963643.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003#slide=2269160

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Posted: 29 April 2013 12:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 109 ]
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Well, here I am in a maternity ward in the Borders in Scotland - my older daughter has just had a girl, our fourth grandchild!  Very exciting.  But no immediate bundt-making opportunities…!  She and husband are very partial to blueberry bundts though.

Flourgirl I’m very interested to hear about cholesterol.  I’ve not had mine tested for years, but am meaning to do so soon.  My sister and I always had low blood pressure and low cholesterol but both things are rising for her.  She’s 5 yrs older than me and so I need to take steps soon I think.  I’m so impressed by your story especially that it’s a better result than meds which we all try and stay off.  But a worry for my husband because he’s had heart problems and a few days ago a TIA which is quite worrying.  Both these run in his family, both sides, but he is so healthy that he recovered really well from heart attack with no surgery, let’s hope TIA is similar (he was completely back to normal within a few hours but of course the chance of another is now a real worry.)  But maybe we do just both need to do what you have done.

Funny, the Huffpost link doesn’t work here, I think it’s because it’s a ‘public’ wifi network - tells me it’s not suitable!  I shall save it for when we get home tomorrow, it sounds great!  And my book has been dispatched….

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Posted: 29 April 2013 02:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 110 ]
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Congratulations , eag, on the birth of your latest grandchild!  We are expecting our third g/child in September, we have two g/daughters already.

Hope your husband keeps well, take care.

Enjoy your book when it arrives!

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Posted: 29 April 2013 10:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 111 ]
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eag - 29 April 2013 03:59 PM

Well, here I am in a maternity ward in the Borders in Scotland - my older daughter has just had a girl, our fourth grandchild!  Very exciting.  But no immediate bundt-making opportunities…!  She and husband are very partial to blueberry bundts though.

Big Congratulations to you and your family! That is very exciting. I’m happy for you!

Flourgirl I’m very interested to hear about cholesterol.  I’ve not had mine tested for years, but am meaning to do so soon.  My sister and I always had low blood pressure and low cholesterol but both things are rising for her.  She’s 5 yrs older than me and so I need to take steps soon I think.  I’m so impressed by your story especially that it’s a better result than meds which we all try and stay off.  But a worry for my husband because he’s had heart problems and a few days ago a TIA which is quite worrying.  Both these run in his family, both sides, but he is so healthy that he recovered really well from heart attack with no surgery, let’s hope TIA is similar (he was completely back to normal within a few hours but of course the chance of another is now a real worry.)  But maybe we do just both need to do what you have done.

TIA is scary. From what I know about it, the damage, if any, is usually not permanent. And it should be taken as a warning.  I hope your husband feels better soon.

Is his physician giving him any nutritional advice about lifestyle changes? 

If you can get that book from your library, I think you will find it helpful.

I feel making big changes is easier than making small changes. I looked at my situation as my new normal and did not look back. Prior to my blood test, I never thought I’d have an abnormal reading. I’m sure all the butter in my baking was a major contributor even though I only eat one piece of cake a day and healthy diet otherwise.

Quick suggestions are: Popcorn without oil or butter is a good snack to have.  Add veggies which have a high soluble fiber content. There are food products on the market which block the absorption of cholesterol such as Benecol (a margarine with a plant sterol).  Taking high soluble fiber laxatives is recommended in the book.  I have Okra every day in my salad. Okra is especially good because of it’s high soluble fiber content.

My doctor felt a lifestyle change should be tried first. Medications were to be considered if I was not successful.

I believe the book suggests a Mediterranean diet.

I’m sure there are a lot of sources on the web which would help you.

My thoughts and well-wishes are with you.

Funny, the Huffpost link doesn’t work here, I think it’s because it’s a ‘public’ wifi network - tells me it’s not suitable!  I shall save it for when we get home tomorrow, it sounds great!  And my book has been dispatched….

 

I hope you are able to see it. A lot of those recipes are from the UK

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Posted: 30 April 2013 05:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 112 ]
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Flourgirl, thanks for the link to the Huffpost, I just clicked on to it and as you say, there are lots of good recipes there.  Will have a closer look later, but it looks interesting!

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Posted: 30 April 2013 12:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 113 ]
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jeannette - 30 April 2013 08:09 AM

Flourgirl, thanks for the link to the Huffpost, I just clicked on to it and as you say, there are lots of good recipes there.  Will have a closer look later, but it looks interesting!

Oh good! I added a few to my ‘to bake’ list. I like the wide array of baking pans they used too.

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Posted: 04 May 2013 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 114 ]
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jeannette - 27 April 2013 08:13 PM

The first one I made was the banana muffins, and I have since made them twice more, they were that good!

I made the Banana Muffins with Walnut Streusel Topping yesterday.  They are awesome! I used a jumbo muffin tin.

I did something different to the bananas which I never did before. Another book recommended pureeing very ripe bananas and freezing them for future use. I did that because I usually have more bananas than I need.  Before adding to the batter, I set the bananas in a strainer and let them drain. A lot of liquid drained from the previously frozen bananas.  These muffins have a great banana taste and the streusel topping is amazing. I had enough topping left over to freeze and use another time.

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Posted: 04 May 2013 02:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 115 ]
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Flourgirl, I am so pleased you liked the Banana Muffins.  I made mine in ‘normal’ size tins, the only ones I have, except for some mini ones, and I got 13 good sized muffins out of the mixture!  I also had lots of the streusel topping over, enough for another batch.  That sounds interesting, the banana freezing you mentioned, I must remember that.

What is the cake in the background of your picture?  Is it something you have baked?

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Posted: 04 May 2013 02:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 116 ]
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.Just looked at your picture again, your glass dome is very similar to the one I had as a Christmas present off my daughter.  Makes our cakes look so special I think! LOL

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Posted: 04 May 2013 03:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 117 ]
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jeannette - 04 May 2013 05:19 PM

Flourgirl, I am so pleased you liked the Banana Muffins.  I made mine in ‘normal’ size tins, the only ones I have, except for some mini ones, and I got 13 good sized muffins out of the mixture!  I also had lots of the streusel topping over, enough for another batch.  That sounds interesting, the banana freezing you mentioned, I must remember that.

What is the cake in the background of your picture?  Is it something you have baked?

I learned of that method from this book:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Sweet-Melissa-Baking-Book/dp/0670018740/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1367689999&sr=8-1&keywords=sweet+melissa+baking+book

I found it to be a great way to deal with ripe bananas.  I would normally bake enough cakes to use them up and freeze the cake but this worked better for me.

I do think I have enough streusel for another batch or I might just use it on a bread. In The Bread Bible there is a favorite recipe which has streusel on top and sliced apples in the center. I think this streusel should work for that recipe too.

The cake under the dome is an Eastern European Honey Cake. It uses light rye flour and a whole jar of Buckwheat Honey. It bakes at a low temp of 225 degrees F for 2 to 2-1/2 hours.  We liked it. I baked it for the first time yesterday too.  The crumb was perfect. It is not overly sweet. The author promises it gets better with age.

Here is the recipe:

http://germanfoodie.com/food_blog/2012/01/06/jewish-honey-cake-lekach/

This is the book it is from (the same book as the apple cake I posted the other day)

http://www.amazon.com/Inside-Jewish-Bakery-Recipes-Memories/dp/1933822236

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Posted: 04 July 2013 07:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 118 ]
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Hello everyone-

Well, it’s been a long, long time since I checked in here.  I’ve been down in the Borders staying with daughter, son in law and new baby for most of the time and have rather lost track of my usual pursuits.  But I’ve had a week off as they are off on holiday with friends (booked before baby!)  Daughter has been very down, having panic attacks etc, though has been brilliant with the baby, but I think going away on holiday and some judiciously-chosen meds, also, have helped a lot.  My own husband seems to be fine, no recurrence of TIA (touch wood).  Flourgirl, thanks very much for all your info.  I had to laugh though because his diet exactly matches what you describe as being good to follow.  He’s one of those folks that, without being at all fussy,  just naturally prefers stuff that’s good for him, and doesn’t really like the stuff that isn’t good for him.  And stops eating as soon as he’s not hungry…sigh…I wish I were like him!

AnywaY, I’m back to bundt-baking with a vengeance!  (The postgrads and postdocs are rejoicing!)  Jeannette, I have discovered that, for recipes that call for leavening (baking powder, baking soda) Mcdougall’s supreme sponge s-r flour really seems to work just as well as the heat-treated cake flour.  It’s very low-protein (8%) and much more finely-ground than the usual s-r or plain flour.  I’ve heard a rumour that Sainsbury’s does a non-s-r ‘own brand’ version but haven’t checked that out yet.  I don’t think the Mcdougall’s is any cheaper than the heat-treated but I can buy it at Morrison’s and I don’t have to buy 16k at once!  I’d still want to use the heat-treated stuff for fatless sponges and the like, ie recipes that don’t involve any leavening except beaten egg.

I’m writing because I’m feeling rather pleased with myself.  I ‘upscaled’ and tweaked a recipe that sounded good (though I hadn’t tried it!) all by myself!  I wanted to make a batch of batter that would be as much as one would normally make for a 10-12 cup bundt pan, because I read somewhere that that amount of batter was right for 4 of the small Kaisercast pans. http://www.amazon.com/Kaiser-KaiserCast-Classic-Mini-Bundform/dp/B0009JKECG
I have 4 of these, two ‘classic’ and two a different design, and hadn’t used them yet, and wanted a small cake to take to a friend who lives on her own.  I wanted to make an almond-lemon cake (using ground almonds, a standard ingredient over here, available in every supermarket) and found a recipe that for a wonder was British and thus in grams.  here’s the recipe I found (on the ‘netmums’ site of all places!):
100ml rapeseed oil
225g caster sugar
3 large eggs
1 lemon, zested and juiced - juice not put in batter but used for glaze (just juice and icing sugar)
250g self-raising flour
50g ground almonds
1 lemon
This sounded good to me, but the illustration showed it in the Nordicware ‘Heart’ bundt pan which I know is on the small side.  Also 100ml of fat/oil sounded very minimal to me, especially in a recipe with no added liquid - dry or what?  Sometimes I think people just lower fat without really considering what it might do to the actual texture of the cake.  So here are the amounts I changed to:
250 ml rapeseed oil
270g caster sugar
4 large eggs
2 lemons, zested and juiced - juice not put in batter
300g s-r flour (Mcdougalls supreme)
75g ground almonds.
And guess what, this worked perfectly!  It does make quite a firm, though not dry, cake and for US tastes I suspect the addition of 1/2-1 c liquid - buttermilk? (plus a bit of baking soda maybe) would make it even better.  It did fill the 4 pans but only just, so, again, maybe adding some liquid would be a good idea on that count also.

I didn’t glaze this cake, though the recipe called for that, but instead made a very tart syrup with the lemon juice and about 2 oz caster sugar (whoops, that would be about 60g!) and a couple of capfuls of Limoncello.  It really is delicious.

I went for the recipe partly also because I had just bought a lot of ‘bargain’ cold-pressed Scottish rapeseed oil - there are fields of the stuff all round us - at Aldi, and I’m a bit concerned about using it before it goes rancid.  It does have a definite taste, something between grassy and nutty, so also I wanted to find out how that would play out in a cake.  I think it might be an acquired taste.  We loved it, but I noticed my friend did not finish her piece!  Oh well, hopefully she’ll be able to recycle the rest of the cake, and it’s only little…But in any case it would be fine in a chocolate or gingerbread or spice cake where the taste of the oil or fat is well masked.

Anyway - sorry for length of this posting.  I was just so excited about, for once, doing something that worked that was based on my own judgment and experience, instead of just slavishly following a recipe.

Next - I still have not tried Rose’s much-praised technique for mixing butter cakes.  So that comes next!

PS - just realised ‘rapeseed oil’ is called ‘canola oil’ in America.

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Posted: 04 July 2013 04:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 119 ]
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Hello again eag,  I’ve wondered where you had vanished to, and actually guessed you might be helping out with your daughter.  We will be having our third g/daughter in about 7weeks time and my son will probably staying with us while his partner is in hospital, she is having a c-section, then I think they will go back to their own home, hopefully It is their first baby, my other two g/daughters live in Devon, they are our daughter’s girls. 
e
Your recipe sounds interesting, and thanks for the tip about McDougall’s flour, I haven’t tried that particular type, I shall look it out, I think I have seen it at our loccoal Sainbury’s.  What I usually do when a recipe calls for ‘cake’ flour is to use just ordinary plain flour but substitute one eighth of the flour with potato flour, obtainable from   Holland & barratt.  It seems to work pretty well, it would be good to be able to compare a cake made with this mixture side by side with one made with cake flour.
I’ve often wondered what ‘canola’ oil was, now I know!  I usually use sunflower oil when it is called for in a recipe.  I read recently that rapeseed oil is preferable to olive oil in cooking, supposed to be healthier.  But I take all of these reports with a pinch of salt, one week an item is fashionable another week it is out of fashion, I use my own common sense, it has stood me in good stead for quite a number of years so far!

Hope your husband continues to keep well! grin

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Posted: 05 July 2013 03:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 120 ]
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Many congrats on imminent arrival of 3d granddaughter Jeannette - how lovely for you, it sounds as if they are all reasonably nearby!  It’s great being a grandparent, isn’t it?

I’ve just tried out the rapeseed oil again with that great banana bundt recipe from Dorie Greenspan which I’ve used before.  The recipe does call for butter, true, but the oil works absolutely perfectly, great taste and perfect texture.  I’m beginning to think that many cake recipes would work fine with oil subbed for butter.  I think Flourgirl has discussed this earlier.  I don’t think I’d do it with a genoise though.  And it might mean sinking blueberries in the blueberry bundt.

I couldn’t agree more with you about common sense.  It’s just that I often don’t trust my own common sense when it comes to baking and tend to think that anything written in black and white MUST be right, even when my experience tells me it isn’t!  Silly I know.

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