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bundt cakes, glazes and fillings
Posted: 11 February 2014 12:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 136 ]
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jeannette - 10 February 2014 04:50 PM

I hope you don’t think I was being critical,  just older and wiser!  I know what it is like to have a lot to do in one day, been there, done that!  Some things I’ve lived to regret, just trying to pass on a bit of my experience as an ‘older’ housewife and baker.

I didn’t think you were anything but helpful! Thank you for the advice. I intend to reap the benefits of your experience. I’m going to wash the bundts by hand. I don’t have anything as detailed as the Bravia so it shouldn’t be that hard.

Thanks Jeannette! I really appreciate your advice. Actually, that is why I am here. grin

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Posted: 11 April 2014 03:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 137 ]
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(Sorry again for long time gap here.  Flour Girl, how is your arm?)

Ladies, I can understand putting Nordic Ware in the dishwasher to make sure it is really clean.  But I’ve never done that,  I think I agree with Jeannette on this one.  But, Flour Girl, I totally understand why you’d do that.  In some ways making sure those pans are really clean after use is the fiddliest part of using them.  Once you have successfully depanned the bundt, it just seems a real hassle to have to spend a fair few minutes making sure they are clean, an anti-climax so to speak!  I have learned to minimize scrubbing by soaking immediately in really hot water and washing-up liquid.  But I still often notice crumbs and grease AFTER I’ve washed and have to do it all over again!  Maybe that’s what happened with the Bavaria pan.

I haven’t tried the whipped cream cake in that pan again, must do so.  But mainly I’m writing because I finally got pictures onto computer.  So I wanted to show you the famous cheesecake, so you know I wasn’t just talking through my bundt pan.  So to speak….

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Posted: 11 April 2014 09:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 138 ]
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eag, nice to see you back!  Your cheesecake is absolutely beautiful, your heart must have been in your mouth when turning it out, at least mine would have been!  I am not familiar with making cheesecakes, I have made the sort you set in the fridge but not a cooked one, I will have to have a go sometime soon.  Was it as good to eat as it looks?

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Posted: 11 April 2014 06:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 139 ]
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Yes, Jeannette, it was - heart in mouth I mean!  I really went to town greasing the pan, pan goo plus wilton spray plus flour!  I followed Hector Wong’s instructions for turnout - after chilling overnight in its pan, I dipped it in a sink full of hot water as you would with a jello mold.  I also ran a small plastic knife around the top edges, and turned the pan edgewise and tapped it all round on the counter before turning it out.  I also put a sheet of baking paper on the (non-stick!) cooling rack before I turned it out.  So not a speedy procedure!  You can see the turnout wasn’t completely flawless but still a very impressive presentation, I do think.  I believe Hector coated his cake with toasted grated coconut; something like that would disguise any minor cracks etc.  The people in the cake club loved it.

It was absolutely delicious, I think the best-tasting cheesecake I’ve ever baked.  I followed the HC recipe for ginger cheesecake, but used fresh lime juice and grated rind as flavouring instead.  I was nervous about the cake turning out, but didn’t want to put any flour in the mix as I always feel that detracts from the rich creaminess.  That was why I chose that particular recipe.  I used exactly the same total amount of dairy product as the recipe said, but I used much more cream cheese and much less sour cream, to ensure a slightly firmer cake and reduce chances of bundt collapse.

Now I really want to try the ginger one, as I love ginger, but I don’t want to push my luck.  I don’t think I’ll try this with the Bavaria pan somehow!

Making cheesecakes is very easy, actually, if you don’t get silly like me and try and do it in a bundt pan. Using a springform tin, lining the bottom of the tin really well and chilling the cake after baking and before turning it out, are essential with all baked cheesecakes (except those made in bundt pans! : - ))

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Posted: 02 July 2014 03:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 140 ]
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Long time no speak everyone!  We have made a long trip to the US since I last wrote, and had our family from Indiana visiting also.  Time seems to whiz by, the youngest granddaughter, the one I wrote about last year, is now over 14 months old!!  Plus there is another one on the way (different family), due September.

Well, I know it is bad form to answer your own message, but I just read the long thread about Wowie cake and thought this might be a good place to post.

The reason I’m posting here is because I was SO impressed by your bundlettes, Flour Girl!  I also have the Heritage bundlette pan and I absolutely love it.  I can’t wait to try the Wowie cake in it.  I have copied down your weight equivalents including the very useful information about how much to put in each little bundlette cavity.

The really interesting thing though is that I used to make that cake all the time - in square pans, round pans, layers, cupcakes - you name it!  (Not in bundt pans in those days.)  But I didn’t get the recipe from the Internet or another baker.  It came from my old Fannie Farmer cookbook from the 1970s which was my main source of recipes back then.  It’s called ‘eggless chocolate cake’ I think.  The only thing different about it is that it calls for buttermilk instead of water and vinegar.  If you think about it they are really much the same thing so far as the chemistry of the cake is concerned.  I loved the recipe because I was constantly running out of eggs for some reason and with 4 small children in the house it was a major production to go to the shops. The other ingredients I didn’t usually run out of, and it was so fast too!  I too made subs, flour for the cocoa and brown sugar instead of white, for a butterscotch/caramel cake effect. (Maybe that happened when I’d run out of cocoa!!)  I love your nut-flour subs though and must try that, though I don’t know if there is any hazelnut meal available here.

It’s so amazing that I came upon this thread, after so long away.

Have you bought any other new bundt pans, any of you?

I have had just one really exciting bundterie, which is making a filling that really works well.  It is a kind of fruit curd but made without butter and with a lot of cornflour/cornstarch cooked in.  On its own it is not so delicious and rich as a real fruit curd, but it is just perfect as a filling in a bundt cake, because it does taste very good combined with the cake, and it doesn’t melt into the cake, though it does sink a bit, but I think I can just modify the cake recipe slightly to prevent that happening again. I won’t post a picture as it was just baked in a standard bundt tin and I haven’t glazed it or anything.  It is delicious with the contrast between the soft, melty curd texture (Pineapple in this case) and the rich cake (coconut).

I also made what I feel is the perfect blueberry bundt, after trying many many recipes!  This is a mini-bundt recipe in the excellent bundt book ‘Cake Simple’ , but using cream cheese instead of the crème fraiche in the recipe (same weight).  I just doubled it to make a full-size bundt cake.  It has over a pound of blueberries in it yet they don’t all sink to the bottom, and the cake is delicious.  I made it with grated rind and juice of lime.

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Posted: 04 July 2014 07:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 141 ]
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eag - 02 July 2014 03:24 PM

Long time no speak everyone!  We have made a long trip to the US since I last wrote, and had our family from Indiana visiting also.  Time seems to whiz by, the youngest granddaughter, the one I wrote about last year, is now over 14 months old!!  Plus there is another one on the way (different family), due September.

Well, I know it is bad form to answer your own message, but I just read the long thread about Wowie cake and thought this might be a good place to post.

The reason I’m posting here is because I was SO impressed by your bundlettes, Flour Girl!  I also have the Heritage bundlette pan and I absolutely love it.  I can’t wait to try the Wowie cake in it.  I have copied down your weight equivalents including the very useful information about how much to put in each little bundlette cavity.

The really interesting thing though is that I used to make that cake all the time - in square pans, round pans, layers, cupcakes - you name it!  (Not in bundt pans in those days.)  But I didn’t get the recipe from the Internet or another baker.  It came from my old Fannie Farmer cookbook from the 1970s which was my main source of recipes back then.  It’s called ‘eggless chocolate cake’ I think.  The only thing different about it is that it calls for buttermilk instead of water and vinegar.  If you think about it they are really much the same thing so far as the chemistry of the cake is concerned.  I loved the recipe because I was constantly running out of eggs for some reason and with 4 small children in the house it was a major production to go to the shops. The other ingredients I didn’t usually run out of, and it was so fast too!  I too made subs, flour for the cocoa and brown sugar instead of white, for a butterscotch/caramel cake effect. (Maybe that happened when I’d run out of cocoa!!)  I love your nut-flour subs though and must try that, though I don’t know if there is any hazelnut meal available here.

It’s so amazing that I came upon this thread, after so long away.

Have you bought any other new bundt pans, any of you?

I have had just one really exciting bundterie, which is making a filling that really works well.  It is a kind of fruit curd but made without butter and with a lot of cornflour/cornstarch cooked in.  On its own it is not so delicious and rich as a real fruit curd, but it is just perfect as a filling in a bundt cake, because it does taste very good combined with the cake, and it doesn’t melt into the cake, though it does sink a bit, but I think I can just modify the cake recipe slightly to prevent that happening again. I won’t post a picture as it was just baked in a standard bundt tin and I haven’t glazed it or anything.  It is delicious with the contrast between the soft, melty curd texture (Pineapple in this case) and the rich cake (coconut).

I also made what I feel is the perfect blueberry bundt, after trying many many recipes!  This is a mini-bundt recipe in the excellent bundt book ‘Cake Simple’ , but using cream cheese instead of the crème fraiche in the recipe (same weight).  I just doubled it to make a full-size bundt cake.  It has over a pound of blueberries in it yet they don’t all sink to the bottom, and the cake is delicious.  I made it with grated rind and juice of lime.

Hi eag!! It’s so good to speak to you again.

Thank you for your kind words. The other day my husband told me he likes the Wowie cake so much better in the bundtlet pan. He said it cooks most evenly in that pan. I sometimes have a sunken middle when baking that cake in an 8inch round pan. I’m sure it is because the cake is under baked. I love the way icing glides gown the curl. I think that has become the cake I bake most often.

I think I remember seeing Cake Simple in my library. I have to see if I can borrow it.  Have you ever tried Kiss My Bundt? I saw it in the store. It is a tiny book but seems to have great reviews. I’ve never tried it.

Yes, I got a new bundt for Valentine’s Day (that is romantic to me LOL ). I just baked in it for the first time yesterday. It is OK. I don’t love it. I chose it because I thought the simple sugar glaze used in the Golden Lemon Almond cake would cascade over the architecture. Unfortunately, the cake has to be made a day in advance and lost the glimmering cascade effect I was hoping for. Here is a pic of it :

The cakes you describe sound relish! You are very creative. I would love to see them and any new pans you bought. I love baking pans and am always looking for something exciting.

It’s great talking to you again.  I hope to talk again soon.

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Posted: 05 July 2014 07:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 142 ]
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I think that cake looks just lovely Flour Girl! 

Snap - I have that pan - the Jubilee pan - too, got it when we went to the US last year, so I wouldn’t have to pay the very high prices over here in the UK.  Oddly, I haven’t used it much, though I do think it’s lovely.  About the glaze - maybe if you reapplied a second batch of glaze just before serving?  It does work beautifully as I remember, but I laboriously BRUSHED the glaze on, it did take a long time.  Also I was dubious about using it for anything with fruit or filling in because I was afraid it would stick, though it seems to have very good release, it’s Nordic Ware’s best quality, isn’t it?  I think I made an orange drizzle-type cake, it was very good and released well. 

A bundt-type pan I’ve gotten recently is a fun pan I got for when the older grandchildren visit, a ‘giant donut’ pan.  I haven’t used it yet.  I bought it from a UK supplier I think, and it wasn’t very expensive, but the box it came in said clearly ‘Williams Sonoma’ -  so definitely American!  What I aim to do first is a good old-fashioned ‘Boston Cream Pie’  cake, with custard filling between the layers (it’s actually 2 separate pans) and chocolate glaze on top, just like I remember from coffee shops in my childhood in New England.  Only in doughnut shape.  I will post a picture, I promise.  One of my husband’s colleagues is an American from New Hampshire who loves baking, so he’s all in favour of this particular experiment!

Plus rather by chance I got a couple of mini-mini-bundt pans - each cavity is about an inch and a half wide, but they actually have teeny-weeny central funnels - really cute.  I thought I was getting something bigger but you can use one of those recipes for flourless chocolate cake with them and you end up with sort of a cross between a chocolate and a cake - yummy!  Amazingly, they don’t seem to stick, maybe because they are so tiny.  What I’d meant to get, and did get eventually, are a couple of 12-hole bundtlette pans.  They are the same size as the Nordic Ware ‘Brownie’ bundlettes which I already have and which are really great for muffins.  But the ones I got are cute because they have a central hole as well.  If you put in a bit more batter than recommended, the batter closes over the top of the funnel bit in the middle, and you end up with a bundtlette with a central hole, but which is closed at the bottom of the hole, so you can put filling such as ganache in the hole and it won’t fall out.  Here is a link, though they were a good deal cheaper when I bought them!  They work very well so long as I use spray.  http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/161161011340?limghlpsr=true&hlpv=2&ops=true&viphx=1&hlpht=true&lpid=108&device=c&adtype=pla&crdt=0&ff3=1&ff11=ICEP3.0.0&ff12=67&ff13=80&ff14=108&ff19=0

It’s great to be chatting with you again.  I think things are settling down a bit now for me, after a couple of years of unexpected activity.  (Famous last words…)

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Posted: 05 July 2014 12:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 143 ]
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eag - 05 July 2014 07:52 AM

I think that cake looks just lovely Flour Girl! 

Snap - I have that pan - the Jubilee pan - too, got it when we went to the US last year, so I wouldn’t have to pay the very high prices over here in the UK.  Oddly, I haven’t used it much, though I do think it’s lovely.  About the glaze - maybe if you reapplied a second batch of glaze just before serving?  It does work beautifully as I remember, but I laboriously BRUSHED the glaze on, it did take a long time.  Also I was dubious about using it for anything with fruit or filling in because I was afraid it would stick, though it seems to have very good release, it’s Nordic Ware’s best quality, isn’t it?  I think I made an orange drizzle-type cake, it was very good and released well. 

A bundt-type pan I’ve gotten recently is a fun pan I got for when the older grandchildren visit, a ‘giant donut’ pan.  I haven’t used it yet.  I bought it from a UK supplier I think, and it wasn’t very expensive, but the box it came in said clearly ‘Williams Sonoma’ -  so definitely American!  What I aim to do first is a good old-fashioned ‘Boston Cream Pie’  cake, with custard filling between the layers (it’s actually 2 separate pans) and chocolate glaze on top, just like I remember from coffee shops in my childhood in New England.  Only in doughnut shape.  I will post a picture, I promise.  One of my husband’s colleagues is an American from New Hampshire who loves baking, so he’s all in favour of this particular experiment!

Plus rather by chance I got a couple of mini-mini-bundt pans - each cavity is about an inch and a half wide, but they actually have teeny-weeny central funnels - really cute.  I thought I was getting something bigger but you can use one of those recipes for flourless chocolate cake with them and you end up with sort of a cross between a chocolate and a cake - yummy!  Amazingly, they don’t seem to stick, maybe because they are so tiny.  What I’d meant to get, and did get eventually, are a couple of 12-hole bundtlette pans.  They are the same size as the Nordic Ware ‘Brownie’ bundlettes which I already have and which are really great for muffins.  But the ones I got are cute because they have a central hole as well.  If you put in a bit more batter than recommended, the batter closes over the top of the funnel bit in the middle, and you end up with a bundtlette with a central hole, but which is closed at the bottom of the hole, so you can put filling such as ganache in the hole and it won’t fall out.  Here is a link, though they were a good deal cheaper when I bought them!  They work very well so long as I use spray.  http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/161161011340?limghlpsr=true&hlpv=2&ops=true&viphx=1&hlpht=true&lpid=108&device=c&adtype=pla&crdt=0&ff3=1&ff11=ICEP3.0.0&ff12=67&ff13=80&ff14=108&ff19=0

It’s great to be chatting with you again.  I think things are settling down a bit now for me, after a couple of years of unexpected activity.  (Famous last words…)

Hi eag,

Yes, it’s the Jubilee pan. Re-glazing is a great idea. I’ll try that next time. I anticipate regular glazes, as opposed to simple sugars, will work well with that pan.

The Almond cake baked very well in the Jubilee and easily released.

That Wilton mini bundt is adorable. I saw that pan in Penny’s. I was tempted to get it but didn’t because I have something very similar, but larger, the NORDIC WARE ANNIVERSARY BUNDTLETTE  This pan, also, allows for filling the center. That is a very good idea eag!

Are the wells of the Wilton pan comparable to cupcakes in size?

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Posted: 06 July 2014 03:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 144 ]
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Yes, the individual wells of that Wilton pan are about like a 12-hole muffin tin, or the wells in the 12-hole Nordic Ware ‘Brownie’  tin.  Definitely smaller than the 6 hole tin you have described.  (I have 6 holer also, only in the ‘Fiesta’ pattern instead of trad bundt pattern.  Definitely makes a bigger size of minibundt.)

I have posted the recipe for the Blueberry Bundt cake here, Abbey, in the ‘bundt’ thread.

Blueberry bundt cake with cream cheese and lime

NB This is basically the recipe for ‘blueberry minibundts’ in Cake Simple by Christy Matheson, p125,  but doubled as that recipe is for 6 minibundts/12 bundlettes.  It works extremely well with subbing of cream cheese (full fat) for buttermilk, slightly less in quantity, and addition of lime zest.  So far it’s worked far better than any of the many other recipes out there – berries don’t sink v much at all and batter is delicious.  Could of course use lemon instead of lime or use more vanilla if you don’t want citrus.  Could try firm raspberries instead of blueberries, maybe with orange rind and juice?  Or a mix of berries?

Cake:
230g soft butter
300g caster sugar
c250g full fat cream cheese
4 eggs, room temp.
zest of 2 limes grated fine
1 t vanilla
420g cake flour, not self-rising (I think AP/plain flour might work ok though cake might not be quite so light)
2t baking powder
½ t soda
pinch of salt
750g fresh blueberries.  NB This is the amount you get by doubling the original recipe’s amount.  I haven’t used this large a quantity, simply because when I tried the recipe I only had c550g.  But I’m pretty sure the higher amount would work.  In fact I’m trying that today and will tell you all how it comes out.  I’ll try and take a photo too!  I’m not sure about using frozen berries, the verdict seems to be out as to whether they sink more, less, or the same as fresh berries.  I think I’ll stick with the fresh ones.  Unfortunately only the big, rather tasteless cultivated ones available here, though later in the summer there are wild bilberries to pick.

Prepare 10cup? bundt pan with pan goop, nonstick spray, whatever.  Be generous as berries might stick a bit.  Put oven to 325-350f, fan 155.  For lighter pan could use 160.  Perfect with Kaisercast ‘Classic’ bundt pan.  Would also be good with Wilton ‘Belle’ .  Or regular bundt pan of course.  I don’t think bundts with stuff in them like blueberries look so good in the very fancy pans.  Also perhaps more likely to stick.

Cream butter, sugar and cream cheese together in mixer until fluffy.  Beat in zest and vanilla. Beat in eggs one at a time, beating well after each one.  Whisk flour and leavening and salt together in another bowl, then add to batter in 2 instalments.

You COULD try using Rose’s quicker, easier method of mixing butter cakes, ie weigh flour, sugar and leavening and salt into bowl, add softened butter and cream cheese, and beat until smooth.  THEN add beaten eggs.  I think because of cream cheese maybe trad. method might be better for this.  In fact I just made 2 versions of a different cake, first using her method and second the trad, and the trad. method gave a slightly firmer batter.

Lastly fold in blueberries, BUT see NB below.

NB: Probably a good idea to line bottom of bundt pan with a smallish layer of batter without blueberries, in case of sinking.  So you’d take that batter out BEFORE you fold blueberries into batter.  However might not be necessary.  Certainly not necessary if you are using bilberries, blaeberries, huckleberries, other varieties of wild blueberries because they don’t sink nearly so much, being much smaller than cultivated blueberries.  In fact c550g of them might be fine as they also have a good deal more flavour than cultivated ones!

Bake until done, c60 min.  Let sit 15-20min or so in pan on rack, then tilt pan, shake gently all round, tapping on worktop, and release onto rack.  If you’ve used the max amount of berries probably doesn’t need anything else, but glaze is nice.

GLAZE:  Beat some icing sugar into juice of the 2 limes.  Probably about a cupful of icing sugar (?weight? c100g?) Brush and rebrush all over cooled cake.

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Posted: 06 July 2014 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 145 ]
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Good Morning eag,

Thank you so much for posting your recipe. I had to hurry off to the grocery store this morning before it got crowded. I Bought some beautiful limes and blueberries, also cream cheese, so I’ll be trying to bake it today or tonight probaly . I just bought a coffee cake pan and wondered if I could use it for this recipe. I just want to use it. smile

After cracking 16 eggs last night and measuring all the ingredients, I realized it would be a smart move to get some sleep and start on the AGF cake today. So, that’s what’s happening. I’m concerned about the pan i’ll be using but it should be okay.
We’ll see!! I read plenty of success stories using a non-stick pan so…. wink

I’ll post later and thanks again. I really appreciate you help and I’m anxious to see the Tweed cake. I also think it is a good-looking cake and I hope it is good.

Abbey

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Posted: 12 July 2014 03:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 146 ]
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I am still in amazement at the beauty of your ‘Tweed Cake’ creation Abbey!  I haven’t worked up my courage yet to try it but definitely will, now, you have given me the impetus.  May try 1/2 recipe in a small angelfood pan I have.

As usual I rashly said I’d be posting a picture of the Blueberry Bundt Cake ‘tomorrow’ - now several days back!  But anyway here is a picture showing inside also.  This was with a glaze of juice of 2 limes and 1 cup icing sugar, but I think I’d be inclined to put a second coat on, so twice the glaze ingredients maybe.  But tasted fine as is also.  This was with the full amount of blueberries - 750g or whatever the recipe says - and no sinkage problems at all.  I did put a very thin coat of plain, un-blueberried batter at the bottom of the pan.  Don’t know if this was necessary but after prepping with both pan goo and a a bit of spray (again just on bottom really) the cake released just fine.

It was this pan.  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Kaisercast-Classic-Bundform-Pan-12-cups-/231026284708

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Posted: 14 July 2014 04:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 147 ]
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PS - Just made this a third time for friends who have lots of unexpected visitors descending on them.

Once again it worked beautifully, though I used a different pan this time, the Nordic Ware ‘Blossom’ pan (the one you like so much Flour Girl).  That pan isn’t quite so big as the Kaiser one so we also got a mini-bundt for ourselves out of it!

I made just one change.  We have a specialist whisky and wine shop in our town, and I happened to see some Italian blueberry liqueur there.  I bought it and though it is rather sweet for my taste it REALLY tastes like blueberries, in fact it has lots of whole blueberries in.  They are ‘selvatica’ ie wild, blueberries and what a difference it makes.  So I put a couple tablespoons of that in the batter for flavouring, instead of so much lime rind and vanilla.  I still included grated rind of one lime.  When I made the glaze I included the juice of just half a lime instead of 2, plus enough of the blueberry liqueur to make it the right consistency.  It is really divine.  The other cakes were great with the larger amount of lime, but I think this version is definitely more ‘blueberryish’.  The knowledgeable young woman in the shop said the liqueur is also great with prosecco, to make a sort of ‘Kir’-type drink I guess.  Haven’t tried that yet….

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Posted: 14 July 2014 08:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 148 ]
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Hi eag smile

Your cake looks real good and I love the shape of that pan. I just might try to bake one this week since I have all the ingredients. It is on my list and I will keep you posted. I missed your earlier post somehow so thanks again.

I like your idea of a little Tweed AFC. And would love to hear about it. I bought some real vanilla beans and one of the real angel food cake pans from the thrift store for $2.99….smile so I want to give that a go.

Have fun eag and I hope you have a very good day.

Abbey

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Posted: 14 July 2014 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 149 ]
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You have a good day too Abbey!  Though I imagine yours is half way through now (I’m just about to bedtime!)

Great you got an angelfood cake tin in the secondhand store.  I’ve gotten some great ‘vintage’ pans online - but thrift shop is the best! LOL

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Posted: 15 July 2014 10:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 150 ]
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Thanks eag.

This time I’m just about to bedtime, but not until I take the Blueberry Bundt cake out of the oven in about an hour. Yes, I actually felt like baking on a week night and will have a nice treat for tomorrow. I will share a pic and let you know how it turns out. I have a feeling it will be very good. Thanks again.

ps-now you have me thinking about ‘vintage’ pans smile

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