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bundt cakes, glazes and fillings
Posted: 02 March 2013 03:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I think I just baked it as written, but I’ve loaned out my RHC book so I can’t check.  To figure out whether a layer cake needs to be scaled to fit in a bundt pan, I first figure out about how many cups of batter the layer cake recipe is likely to make.  If it calls for one 9x2 round, the pan capacity is about 8 2/3 cups, and Rose fills her pans between half and two-thirds full, so it would make 4 1/3 cups batter (or a little more).  My Bundt pan is a 6-cup, and bundts can be filled 3/4 full, so I would want about 4 1/2 cups of batter in it.  I probably baked it as written, since the amounts are so close.  Baking time may have been a little shorter than for the 9x2 pan.

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Posted: 03 March 2013 05:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Hello Julie and Flour Girl,

Yeah, Flour Girl, I love that mini-Fiesta pan, I got it a few months ago on eBay.  The glaze was just rum and icing/confectioners sugar, very simple.  Spooned on when cakes had cooled, over and over til mostly used up.

Many thanks for tip about sizing Julie.  I like the look of that recipe too, it would need to be doubled then for a regular sized bundt cake pan then, do you think?

I’ve had a few bundt adventures since we last talked, but nothing really exciting or innovative.  Still keen to crack the filling conundrum!

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Posted: 03 March 2013 12:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Thanks eag. I love glazes…gotta try yours smile

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Posted: 04 March 2013 05:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Hello,

I think this heart was another successful glaze, though it was more of a soaking syrup than a glaze at first.  Around here we have lots of wonderful soft fruit growing in the summer, so I always pick loads of strawberries.  But as we all know they don’t freeze well.  So I usually puree most of them and freeze the unsweetened puree.  For this cake, I wanted pink or red but nothing artificial, so I got one of my packets of pureed strawberries out of the freezer, thawed it, mixed in a few spoonfuls of icing sugar. That was a bit too sweet, so I squeezed in some lemon juice and a spoonful or so of Kirsch.  Then I started brushing it on the warm cake, and brushed it on over and over, though I still had some left.  This wasn’t the big heart bundt mould, though I do have that, but rather one of the 4 cakes from the ‘quartet’ tin, so really a very small cake (just enough for 2!)  Anyway in the end, though I didn’t think it would work, it was very effective and really delicious, really fresh strawberry flavour.  And of course the fresh raspberries helped though this is really the wrong time of year for them.

The other 2 pictures are my first proper baking from the Heavenly Cake book.  I had some extra-thick double cream, about 50 gm butterfat per 100 gm cream, so I made the whipped cream cake.  It is absolutely delicious, but it did come out a bit clooty - see picture.  Should I just have baked it a bit longer?  I really didn’t want it to be dry, and it tastes wonderful, but the perfectionist in me wants a perfect crumb….

Or I’m wondering if my habit of shoogling the cake in the tin right after I take it from the oven, to make sure it isn’t sticking, maybe makes a delicate cake like this collapse in on itself a bit.  What do you all think?

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Posted: 04 March 2013 05:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Sorry - meant to send this attached to previous message.

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Posted: 05 March 2013 08:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I love, love, love your heart-shaped cake with strawberry glaze and raspberries, cake with fruit is one of my favorite desserts!  Your whipped cream cake looks quite nice, too smile  The crumb looks pretty good in the photo.  I would guess, from your description, that the cake was either very slightly underbaked, or else that shaking the pan when it first came out of the oven may have had an influence.  In general, Rose’s cakes are quite tender- which makes them fabulous to eat- but they are about as tender as you can make them and still have them hold together and bake up flat.

Love seeing your baking, thanks for the post!

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Posted: 05 March 2013 11:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Beautiful heart!! You decorated that cake the nicest I have ever seen a cake from that pan. Your Whipped Cream Cake looks great to me. Whenever I serve it, it is always a winner.

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Posted: 05 March 2013 02:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Yes, flour girl, you mentioned a delicious vanilla glaze for that whipped cream cake too, sounds yummy.  (Actually when I think about it that strawberry glaze would be good for that cake too!)  My husband said 2 of the students asked him for the recipe! 

(My method for avoiding uncontrolled expansion - of my body I mean - is for us to have a couple of pieces, then oh takes the rest to the postgrad students and researchers in his workplace.  They devour it like locusts…doesn’t matter whether it’s a success, a disaster - they eat it.  I don’t get very discerning feedback from them.  But at least they protect me from myself!)

Julie, thanks for the tip about these cakes being tender.  As you say it makes them mucho delicioso, but maybe I need to be a bit less forceful with them.  I now know that particular one doesn’t stick, so I won’t have to shoogle it next time.  I’ll also leave it in the oven a bit longer.  I did once make a previous cake using cream only, but it wasn’t such a great recipe and came out rather dry, so I was a bit concerned about that this time, but I think this one will be fine baked a little longer.

I’ve just tried out a cheap silicone pan I got last year which has 9 little railway cars.  It worked quite well, though I find silicone pans bake rather unevenly.  But the cars came out with quite good detail, didn’t stick, and it’s really cute!  I haven’t taken a picture though, I think I’ll wait and see if I can replicate the same result with the rest of the batter.  I’m thinking it would be great to take the pan along when I visit the grandsons, I could just roll it up and put it in my suitcase!

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Posted: 06 March 2013 11:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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The vanilla glaze I make for the Whipped Cream Cake is very simple: confectioner’s sugar, a few TB of heavy cream and 1/4 tsp vanilla.

Your heart cake inspired me to bake today.  I am baking a yellow cake, torting it (with my new Agbay cake leveler YAY!), spreading jam on the layers and making a glaze with some of the jam.

I made this once before and my family loved it. 

Thanks for the inspiration eag, I love seeing your creations.

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Posted: 06 March 2013 05:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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That glaze sounds scrumptious!  And can you post a picture of your finished torte? 

I like the idea of a jam glaze as we always have lots of jam around.  The strawberry jam is always runny too - natural glaze material!

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Posted: 07 March 2013 11:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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eag - 06 March 2013 09:37 PM

That glaze sounds scrumptious!  And can you post a picture of your finished torte? 

I like the idea of a jam glaze as we always have lots of jam around.  The strawberry jam is always runny too - natural glaze material!

Hi eag,

Here is a picture of the cake I baked yesterday. I had a little cake-wreck issue. The book I was using only had volume measurements. This is the second time I made this cake. The first time, the top had cracked. I thought it might be the heat and timing of the recipe. Since the recipe is a little older, I felt my oven might be more efficient and required less time (the cake bakes at 375 for 40-45 min). So I checked the cake early. The cake was not yet browned and still had deep cracks both times. I couldn’t imagine what I did wrong and then it hit me! I used the weight of AP flour instead of cake flour for the 3 cups called for in the recipe (120g more flour). I also used Rose’s techniques (as I do regardless of the recipe) so the cake may have been over-beat for this particular recipe as this recipes says “until combined”.

The torting was a breeze. I LOVE the AGBAY Cake Leveler! It is truly amazing. Since this is the first time I have used it, I was not careful enough when handling the cracked top layer (ugh!)  so I had to change my plans for the jelly glaze. Instead I used the lighter, vanilla glaze. The jelly in between the layer was peach (because that jar was nearing it’s expiration date).

Despite all this, the cake came out delicious and very moist.

The recipe for the jelly glaze:

http://www.joyofbaking.com/ApricotGlaze.html

You can use any jelly and substitute water for the liquor.  I let this glaze cool and then beat it with confectioners sugar for a more thick and less transparent glaze.

Can bundts be torted?

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Posted: 07 March 2013 03:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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That looks really yummy - peach jam, mmmm!  Flour can be a problem, can’t it?  I’ve kind of started thinking I’m just going to go for recipes that have weight measures.  That’s a really great thing about Rose’s book.  But then I find yet another terrific American recipe in cups and I just have to try it!  What I should do is try it, but always weigh the sugar and flour once I’ve measured it into the cups.  I’ve gotten hold of so-called cake flour over here, which is unbleached but heat-treated, and it certainly does tend to give much better results.  I think it might also be finer-ground, because it weighs heavier than plain flour, on the whole. 

So is ‘torting’ slicing a cake horizontally?  I wasn’t sure what the term meant, but I think that’s it, right?  I gather the Agbay is a really super-deluxe way to do this - when I googled it,  it looks kind of like a papercutter!  I have only a humble little one that is just basically a saw-toothed wire strung between two metal uprights, and you can change the height of the wire, I think the uprights are only about 9” apart.  Or I use a very fine-toothed long knife like a breadknife but which I actually bought in a bake supply shop.  Both of these work fine for me.  If I were trying to do this to big cakes a lot, I’d probably want something like the Agbay.  But I don’t really make layered cakes very much, except for one special wedding cake I’ve made for 4 or 5 weddings and big birthdays.  That involves a genoise, which is a lot easier to cut in layers, since it’s very light and all the eggs greatly increase tensile strength!  There are some lovely-looking recipes involving 6 or 8 very thin layers, I can see how such a gadget would make that a lot easier. 

I have seen at least one picture of a layered bundt, I think it was called a ‘boston cream pie’ bundt and involved a yellow bundt, vanilla confectioners’ cream and a chocolate glaze dribbled on top.  Just like a good old-fashioned Boston Cream Pie!  It was the simple, standard bundt pan.  I think layering would interfere with the beautiful design of the more intricate pans.  I thought I might try it some day and you could ring all sorts of changes with it, I would think, like stabilized whipped cream, orange or lemon filling, fruit, jam,  etc etc.  It was just 2 layers though.  There is also one other tin which I have, a Wilton cast aluminum one, the ‘Belle’ pan, which I think might work well because it has a simple repeated horizontal motif, so you could make the cuts along the horizontal lines.  So many bundts, so little time….!

I have to tell you all, I made a marble bundt in the Kaiser ‘Classic’ bundt pan, last night, so easy because it was an oil-based recipe where you just did 6 alternating layers of batter - no marbling required, it does it itself!  it worked really well, though again, slightly undercooked on top (i.e. what becomes the bottom).  I seem to be getting impatient!  Actually I think I was going out or something.  And the chocolate part that was a bit undercooked was really delicious!  Excuses, excuses….

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Posted: 08 March 2013 01:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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eag - 07 March 2013 07:11 PM

That looks really yummy - peach jam, mmmm!  Flour can be a problem, can’t it?  I’ve kind of started thinking I’m just going to go for recipes that have weight measures.  That’s a really great thing about Rose’s book.  But then I find yet another terrific American recipe in cups and I just have to try it!  What I should do is try it, but always weigh the sugar and flour once I’ve measured it into the cups.  I’ve gotten hold of so-called cake flour over here, which is unbleached but heat-treated, and it certainly does tend to give much better results.  I think it might also be finer-ground, because it weighs heavier than plain flour, on the whole. 

So is ‘torting’ slicing a cake horizontally?  I wasn’t sure what the term meant, but I think that’s it, right?  I gather the Agbay is a really super-deluxe way to do this - when I googled it,  it looks kind of like a papercutter!  I have only a humble little one that is just basically a saw-toothed wire strung between two metal uprights, and you can change the height of the wire, I think the uprights are only about 9” apart.  Or I use a very fine-toothed long knife like a breadknife but which I actually bought in a bake supply shop.  Both of these work fine for me.  If I were trying to do this to big cakes a lot, I’d probably want something like the Agbay.  But I don’t really make layered cakes very much, except for one special wedding cake I’ve made for 4 or 5 weddings and big birthdays.  That involves a genoise, which is a lot easier to cut in layers, since it’s very light and all the eggs greatly increase tensile strength!  There are some lovely-looking recipes involving 6 or 8 very thin layers, I can see how such a gadget would make that a lot easier. 

I have seen at least one picture of a layered bundt, I think it was called a ‘boston cream pie’ bundt and involved a yellow bundt, vanilla confectioners’ cream and a chocolate glaze dribbled on top.  Just like a good old-fashioned Boston Cream Pie!  It was the simple, standard bundt pan.  I think layering would interfere with the beautiful design of the more intricate pans.  I thought I might try it some day and you could ring all sorts of changes with it, I would think, like stabilized whipped cream, orange or lemon filling, fruit, jam,  etc etc.  It was just 2 layers though.  There is also one other tin which I have, a Wilton cast aluminum one, the ‘Belle’ pan, which I think might work well because it has a simple repeated horizontal motif, so you could make the cuts along the horizontal lines.  So many bundts, so little time….!

I have to tell you all, I made a marble bundt in the Kaiser ‘Classic’ bundt pan, last night, so easy because it was an oil-based recipe where you just did 6 alternating layers of batter - no marbling required, it does it itself!  it worked really well, though again, slightly undercooked on top (i.e. what becomes the bottom).  I seem to be getting impatient!  Actually I think I was going out or something.  And the chocolate part that was a bit undercooked was really delicious!  Excuses, excuses….

Thanks eag! It is a very good cake. I usually don’t buy books without weight measurements but if I do I follow Rose’s chart of weights and/or the weight she will list for an ingredient in a recipe. I like to get books from the library and bake different things all the time. I’m always baking something new and different for us.

Actually, I think cake flour is lighter than all purpose flour.  I believe it is the lower protein content which makes cake flour more tender.  Here is something I found on the subject:

http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-cake-flou-74565

I didn’t realize you aren’t from the US. I’ve heard it is difficult to get bleached flour outside the States.

Yes, torting is slicing the cake horizontally. I was looking for a cake knife when I came across this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HdvIgX506U

This cake was my first opportunity to use it. Now I’ll be looking for cakes to torte. The only thing is, I don’t really like buttercream. I much prefer glazes or streusel. I don’t like layered cakes much either.  But, one of the books I got from the library had a cake my family really liked. It called for raspberry jam. I used strawberry instead. It stayed moist all week.

You made a wedding cake?!!! That’s quite a feat! Congratulations! I can’t imagine myself ever doing that. I made a cake for a family birthday party and I was anxious until it was completed.

That marble bundt sounds great! I like that it is an oil cake. I make butter cakes for my family. I, personally, don’t use butter anymore and only eat cakes made with oil and a comparatively small amount of egg.  Did that recipe come from a book? It sounds fabulous!

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Posted: 08 March 2013 06:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Thanks eag! It is a very good cake. I usually don’t buy books without weight measurements but if I do I follow Rose’s chart of weights and/or the weight she will list for an ingredient in a recipe. I like to get books from the library and bake different things all the time. I’m always baking something new and different for us.

Actually, I think cake flour is lighter than all purpose flour.  I believe it is the lower protein content which makes cake flour more tender.  Here is something I found on the subject:

http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-cake-flou-74565

I didn’t realize you aren’t from the US. I’ve heard it is difficult to get bleached flour outside the States.

Yes, torting is slicing the cake horizontally. I was looking for a cake knife when I came across this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HdvIgX506U

This cake was my first opportunity to use it. Now I’ll be looking for cakes to torte. The only thing is, I don’t really like buttercream. I much prefer glazes or streusel. I don’t like layered cakes much either.  But, one of the books I got from the library had a cake my family really liked. It called for raspberry jam. I used strawberry instead. It stayed moist all week.

You made a wedding cake?!!! That’s quite a feat! Congratulations! I can’t imagine myself ever doing that. I made a cake for a family birthday party and I was anxious until it was completed.

That marble bundt sounds great! I like that it is an oil cake. I make butter cakes for my family. I, personally, don’t use butter anymore and only eat cakes made with oil and a comparatively small amount of egg.  Did that recipe come from a book? It sounds fabulous!

It’s great to ‘meet’ a fellow experimenter, Flour girl!  yes, I live in the UK, but actually I’m from the US originally so I’m easy with both types of measurements, but increasingly I feel more comfortable with dry ingredients, especially flour and the like, being weighed rather than cupped.

Inspired by your thoughts about regular/plain vs cake flour, I just weighed equal cups of each, scooping both and levelling carefully, using the same cup and knife.  The regular flour (we call it ‘plain flour’ here, and it’s a bit lower in protein than A-P flour) weighed just .05 of an ounce less than the ‘cake’ flour!  In other words, they seem to be just about the same.  I think even that difference is probably explained by the fact that the cake flour is in a great big bag so I think it’s compressed more than the plain flour, which is just the usual 1 k bag.  Anyway, .05 of an ounce translates to about 1.5 grammes - a teeny-weeny amount which as I say is probably just due to slight differences in density, scooping, leveling etc.  I mean you’d probably get a difference like that just between cups of the very same flour for the same batch of batter.  Interesting that I’ve always translated a cup as being 4 oz, whereas what I got this time was basically 5 oz.  Again, that will surely be due to differences in the measuring method, and to me illustrates again why weight is much more reliable and less hassle too, when it comes to things like flour, ground nuts, etc.

I also watched the youtube Agbay video - awesome!  I don’t think I really ‘need’ it at this point, but who knows?  Maybe 8 layer cakes will be my next obsession!  If so I’d certainly go for one of these, though they don’t seem to sell them over here.

Really, the wedding cake wasn’t that difficult.  I can assure you I’m hopeless at intricate piping, etc - and I really dislike fondant icing so all the spectacular effects you can get with that leave me cold.  This wedding cake is about the taste, the only decoration is french-type buttercream icing on top and sides (or you can use ganache) plus a bunch of fresh flowers stuck in the middle of the top, and good-quality flaked dark chocolate coating the sides - covers a multitude of sins I can tell you!  It’s a ‘composed’ affair, with layers of chocolate genoise or fatless sponge with ground hazelnuts,  chocolate souffle mixture baked flat and cut in rounds, and chocolate ganache, and lots of boozy syrup soaking the genoise.  What they call a ‘gateau’ over here.  Very continental and very, very delicious, somehow light but rich, and it does look very nice too, in an understated way.  I have made it in two tiers for the bigger weddings, but no more.  So it isn’t a ‘spectacle’ kind of cake, but a very delicious kind of cake which does take time and effort but not the kind of amazing skill that some people do have. 

The marble cake is another Alice Medrich recipe, I think it’s called ‘Alice Medrich’s Tiger Cake’ or something similar.  It was in a book originally I think - ‘Bitter’ something? - but seems to be widely available on the web, which is where I ran across it.  It makes a really delicious and very attractive poundcake-type bundt.  I guess she does a lot of oil recipes these days.  I’m planning to try Rose’s oil-based recipes also.  (These are both authors that give weight measurements btw.)  But that recipe does have rather a lot of eggs I think, so you might want to tweak it a bit if you don’t like eggs.

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Posted: 08 March 2013 12:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Hi eag,

Is the AP flour in the UK different from the flour found in the States?  On Rose’s Basic Pastry Ingredients Weights And Measures Chart, found in her book The Pie And Pastry Bible Unbleached AP flour weighs 130g lightly scooped or 148g dipped and swept. Cake flour (ours is usually bleached) weighs 100g sifted, 114g lightly spooned and 130 dipped and swept.

Do you follow Rose’s weight measurements?

I have a UK book Bourke Street Bakery which allows the use of AP flour for UK’s plain flour by weight.

You make it seem easy to bake and prepare a wedding cake. I am sure I could never pull it off. Stick around and you will see pics of my regular cakes which will prove I could never make a wedding cake.  LOL


That recipe is Alice Medrich’s?!! I have many of her books. I don’t have Bittersweet: The Ultimate Dessert Maker’s Guide to Chocolate but I have a low fat version Chocolate And The Art Of Low-Fat Desserts I have made that marble cake and love it. I make it in
Nordic Ware’s Pound Cake Pan

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