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bundt cakes, glazes and fillings
Posted: 08 March 2013 01:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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eag,  I have just been looking at your bundt cakes, I have a few of these tins and love to try out recipes in them.  My favourite is the ‘Heritage’ tin, I love the swirls of this one, it makes even a plain cake look special.  The main reason I am commenting is because you say your Whipped Cream cake crumb was ‘clooty’,  a term I am not familiar with, but I can guess what you mean!  wink  I have made this cake a few times, the first time with American cake flour, which I was lucky enough to be gifted, and this one turned out perfectly.  The next one I made to be taken to a friend, it looked as perfect as the first one but I was dismayed when it was cut to find it had what looked like an line of uncooked mixture through the middle.  This one and the next one I made were made with UK plain flour with a percentage of potato flour mixed with it.  I have come to the conclusion that this particular cake can only be made successfully with US cake flour, which is disappointing.  I have used the mixture of plain flour and potato flour for other cakes in Rose’s Heavenly Cakes and they have always been successful, in fact I use that book more than any other for my cakes.  There are so many lovely cakes in that book. 
As you can guess I live in the UK too, in N. Wales actually, whereabouts are you?  I love all the cakes you have pictured so far, keep them coming!

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Posted: 08 March 2013 02:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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Oh, how great you’ve made that marble cake - it really is gorgeous isn’t it?!  I think it would be beautiful in a pan like the one in the link.  I have one almost identical to that one, I must try that.  The pan I used, the Kaiser Classic, is quite plain, but I think a really simple one like the tube pan might be even better.  In the end I brushed it with an icing sugar-cheap chocolate liqueur glaze also, which was nice, though perhaps not really necessary.  I realised one thing that makes that such a good recipe is that the chocolate bit has cocoa, water and sugar added, so it’s not all dry, which marble cakes so often are when just cocoa is added to the batter for the chocolate bit.

Interesting about the weights of all the flours, that US cake flour is lighter than A-P.  Yes, I think plain flour must be very similar to unbleached A-P.  Bleached flour is not legal in EU countries, which is why the cake flour I use is heat-treated, which apparently has a similar effect as bleaching - breaks down the gluten or something, so the cake is tenderer.  It does seem to work.  Yes, I just use the weight column in Rose’s recipes, it seems to work perfectly!  Both cakes I’ve made by her have been exquisite, very tender.

The Bourke St Bakery book looks very interesting.  I think it’s actually from Australia but they use UK measurements and ingredients so would translate very well.  But - I have a real cookbook problem - I have to try and kick the addiction, I can’t really justify it any more now that I have the internet.  Do you find yourself lying about ordering cookbooks?  It’s so embarrassing….I succeeded for quite a while, years in fact, in not buying any more but recently….

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Posted: 08 March 2013 02:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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[this is in reply to Jeannette - sorry you must have posted while I was writing to Flour Girl]

Oh - another UK baker - how exciting!  I live up in Scotland, in East Fife.

Clooty crumb (I think that’s a N of England term but Scots use it too!) - I actually have had great success with the UK ‘cake’ flour, i.e. heat-treated, that I’ve been using.  (I don’t mean Macdougalls, which is self-raising).  I honestly don’t think the problem with the whipped cream cake had anything to do with the flour, I’ve had it occasionally with British recipes that I’ve made also, it’s just me being impatient I think, the same thing happened with the marble cake that I baked next and I know I just didn’t bake that quite long enough.  I’ll just have to make the whipped cream cake again to see what happens - I love having an excuse to buy that extra-thick double cream - yum!

I LOVE the Heritage tin too.  Dorrie Greenspan’s banana bread recipe is just divine baked in that!  It’s also been great making recipes I’ve been using for years and having them work beautifully in these lovely tins.

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Posted: 08 March 2013 03:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Hello again eog,  My husband is from Dundee, your part of the country!

I am interested in the heat-treated flour you mention, is is a commercial brand or something you make up yourself?  I am thinking of Kate’s Flour, do you know of this?  If not, you can read up on it if you go to Rose’s Blog page, just type in Kate’s Flour and you’ll find lots of info. about it.  Kate lives in Devon, I have met up with her and through corresponding with her via this website and e-mails, she very kindly arranged an unforgettable meeting for me and another member with Rose herself, just three years ago when Rose was on a visit to the UK.  I’ll never forget it, it was a wonderful afternoon and Rose is a most charming and kind lady you could wish to meet!

I must try the Whipped Cream cake again soon, you know when you have a disappointment it puts you off something for a while doesn’t it?  But I mustn’t let it beat me!

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Posted: 09 March 2013 03:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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eag - 08 March 2013 06:38 PM

Oh, how great you’ve made that marble cake - it really is gorgeous isn’t it?!  I think it would be beautiful in a pan like the one in the link.  I have one almost identical to that one, I must try that.  The pan I used, the Kaiser Classic, is quite plain, but I think a really simple one like the tube pan might be even better.  In the end I brushed it with an icing sugar-cheap chocolate liqueur glaze also, which was nice, though perhaps not really necessary.  I realised one thing that makes that such a good recipe is that the chocolate bit has cocoa, water and sugar added, so it’s not all dry, which marble cakes so often are when just cocoa is added to the batter for the chocolate bit.

Interesting about the weights of all the flours, that US cake flour is lighter than A-P.  Yes, I think plain flour must be very similar to unbleached A-P.  Bleached flour is not legal in EU countries, which is why the cake flour I use is heat-treated, which apparently has a similar effect as bleaching - breaks down the gluten or something, so the cake is tenderer.  It does seem to work.  Yes, I just use the weight column in Rose’s recipes, it seems to work perfectly!  Both cakes I’ve made by her have been exquisite, very tender.

The Bourke St Bakery book looks very interesting.  I think it’s actually from Australia but they use UK measurements and ingredients so would translate very well.  But - I have a real cookbook problem - I have to try and kick the addiction, I can’t really justify it any more now that I have the internet.  Do you find yourself lying about ordering cookbooks?  It’s so embarrassing….I succeeded for quite a while, years in fact, in not buying any more but recently….

Hi eag,

Yes, the tube pan makes a beautiful cake. It really shows off the marbling. Alice recommends a tube pan in the recipe I use. I haven’t made this cake for a while so I just re-read the recipe. It uses dutch processed cocoa and expresso powder. It also calls for 6TB butter. Since I no longer eat butter I will get the Bittersweet book from the library and try your version which uses oil. If there are more than 3 eggs in that recipe, I will try to substitute some egg whites instead.

Yes, Bourke Street Bakery’s book is from Australia.  Some of the recipes I have tried call for self-rising flour.

I love books on baking. Fortunately for me, my family knows that about me and gives me books for every occasion.  My second favorite thing is baking pans, especially bundt pans.  I have been thinking about your heart pan since I saw your cake. Is that your favorite pan?

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Posted: 09 March 2013 03:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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eag - 07 March 2013 07:11 PM

I have to tell you all, I made a marble bundt in the Kaiser ‘Classic’ bundt pan, last night, so easy because it was an oil-based recipe where you just did 6 alternating layers of batter - no marbling required, it does it itself!  it worked really well, though again, slightly undercooked on top (i.e. what becomes the bottom).  I seem to be getting impatient!  Actually I think I was going out or something.  And the chocolate part that was a bit undercooked was really delicious!  Excuses, excuses….

Is this the recipe? It looks amazing. I really want to try it. Five eggs and whole milk. I’ll have to do some major tweaking on this recipe. Do you think I can sub buttermilk for the milk? To replace the 5 eggs I can use 3 whole eggs and 4 egg whites as a starting point and see how that works out.

http://www.food.com/recipe/alice-medrichs-tiger-cake-225113

The book this recipe is in has been out of print for a while. It will soon be released as a paperback.

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Posted: 09 March 2013 04:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Yes, that is the recipe.  I hadn’t realised til I reread it just now, that I did do a very minor bit of tweaking myself.  I didn’t bother with the white pepper at all, it’s pretty tasteless stuff in my opinion so I don’t have it round the house.  When I make this again (definitely will do, using that tube pan!) I might try putting a couple spoonfuls mole paste in the chocolate batter just to give a bit of a kick, something like what the white pepper would do.  I’ve used that paste in other recipes and it can work really well, depending. 

Also I used light cream instead of milk because we had some that was just about to go off!  (I have to admit my cooking is often inspired by what I’ve overbought….)

And finally I used cake flour instead of plain.

But you’d want to go in the other direction, obviously, where the dairy products are concerned.  Buttermilk might be a good idea to offset the extra toughness that using egg whites instead of whole eggs might cause.  But I think you’d have to add a half teaspoonful or so of baking soda if you used buttermilk, to offset the extra acid.  What do you and others think?  Does that sound good?  In my experience eggs are a surprisingly flexible ingredient, I mean it seems as if you can use fewer and things come out much the same.  My dil in Seattle makes a mean pound cake which calls for 6 eggs but she used 5 once when she didn’t have 6, and says it came out fine, and she is a very good cook indeed.

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Posted: 09 March 2013 04:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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jeannette - 08 March 2013 07:05 PM

Hello again eog,  My husband is from Dundee, your part of the country!

I am interested in the heat-treated flour you mention, is is a commercial brand or something you make up yourself?  I am thinking of Kate’s Flour, do you know of this?  If not, you can read up on it if you go to Rose’s Blog page, just type in Kate’s Flour and you’ll find lots of info. about it.  Kate lives in Devon, I have met up with her and through corresponding with her via this website and e-mails, she very kindly arranged an unforgettable meeting for me and another member with Rose herself, just three years ago when Rose was on a visit to the UK.  I’ll never forget it, it was a wonderful afternoon and Rose is a most charming and kind lady you could wish to meet!

I must try the Whipped Cream cake again soon, you know when you have a disappointment it puts you off something for a while doesn’t it?  But I mustn’t let it beat me!

No you mustn’t let it beat you!  I recently had an unforgettable run of sticking with my lovely pans, 3 different recipes, 3 different pans but one after the other - whaaaa?  To this day I haven’t really figured it out and have used all 3 pans again and they’ve worked fine.  Must have been the recipes - one I actually found someone else on the web had had problems with, but of the other 2, one was a recipe I’d made successfully with no sticking previously!!  I figure it must have been the gremlins….

The heat-treated flour is from Matthews Cotswold Flour mills.  I found them online.  I’m afraid they only have some huge quantity, 16 k or similar, but I bit the bullet and ordered it delivered.  It does seem to work as it’s meant to, but it is quite compressed being in such a big bag, so ‘by weight’ recipes definitely work best, and sifting is indicated.  And if there was any damp at all where it was stored, that would be bad news.  It does take up a lot of room and is expensive, though not unforgiveably so.  What a shame you don’t live nearby, I could deliver some to you!  I go to the Clandestine Cake Club in Dundee, we could exchange there…ah well, never mind!  I think there is some online shop selling US goodies which has the usual US brand, is it ‘Softasilk’?  in small, very expensive, quantities.  And technically illegal I imagine, since it is bleached, though I daresay nobody knows or cares.

So you are one of the lucky people who got to meet Rose, how wonderful!  I have read about Kate’s Flour I think in the thread you mention on this blog.  I know I’d never have the patience to do that alas.

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Posted: 09 March 2013 12:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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eag - 09 March 2013 08:40 AM

Yes, that is the recipe.  I hadn’t realised til I reread it just now, that I did do a very minor bit of tweaking myself.  I didn’t bother with the white pepper at all, it’s pretty tasteless stuff in my opinion so I don’t have it round the house.  When I make this again (definitely will do, using that tube pan!) I might try putting a couple spoonfuls mole paste in the chocolate batter just to give a bit of a kick, something like what the white pepper would do.  I’ve used that paste in other recipes and it can work really well, depending. 

Also I used light cream instead of milk because we had some that was just about to go off!  (I have to admit my cooking is often inspired by what I’ve overbought….)

And finally I used cake flour instead of plain.

But you’d want to go in the other direction, obviously, where the dairy products are concerned.  Buttermilk might be a good idea to offset the extra toughness that using egg whites instead of whole eggs might cause.  But I think you’d have to add a half teaspoonful or so of baking soda if you used buttermilk, to offset the extra acid.  What do you and others think?  Does that sound good?  In my experience eggs are a surprisingly flexible ingredient, I mean it seems as if you can use fewer and things come out much the same.  My dil in Seattle makes a mean pound cake which calls for 6 eggs but she used 5 once when she didn’t have 6, and says it came out fine, and she is a very good cook indeed.

Yes, I am trying to make the cake as low in cholesterol as possible. Light creams sounds luscious! I would omit the pepper too.

I wonder if it would be better to go with the low fat version and substitute oil for the butter. I could follow the mixing instructions from the Tiger Cake or follow Rose’s technique.  The last time I tried it I substituted vegan butter for the regular butter but I don’t use that anymore either.

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Posted: 03 April 2013 05:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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I’m sorry to be so long replying.
I’ve never been able to make up my mind about fat reduction in cakes.  Of course there are fatless recipes and they work fine but the cakes are dry, no getting away from that.  I guess a lot of people put some sort of fruit puree in, don’t they?

I hope you have all had a good holiday.  I’ve been away quite a bit and got back full of enthusiasm for bundt baking.  Friends invited us to Easter dinner, and I had to cook the sweet course so naturally I decided on bundts (plural) - one strawberry-rhubarb and one chocolate!  I attach a picture.  The third cake is the other half of the strawberry-rhubarb batter.

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Posted: 04 April 2013 02:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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They look great eag. Glad to see you back. Which pan did you use for the cake with the strawberries?

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Posted: 04 April 2013 05:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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Flour Girl - 04 April 2013 05:10 AM

They look great eag. Glad to see you back. Which pan did you use for the cake with the strawberries?

Ah, that was one of my second-hand purchases on eBa, a 6 cup tin.  From the US, a seller in the Midwest I think.  It is one of those lightweight aluminium pans that I think was probably used mainly for jello desserts back in the days, you know the kind I mean.  They work fine for bundts just so long as you slather on the ‘pan goo’ and for good measure I also sprayed it with Wilton spray for baking.  I try not to use that very much as it has lecithin in it, but I figure if I put it on top of a coat of pan goo it probably won’t affect the pan, but it does seem to help with clean release. 

I’ve been looking out for more of these pans because I find the 6-cup size very handy indeed.  So far I have 4.  2 of them are the standard-issue Nordic ware ones (the cake on the right), but I also have 2 others.  I’ve attached a photo of a cake using the other non-Nordic ware one, a delicious orange cake soaked with orange syrup, which I intend to make again and again!  This was also secondhand from the US but from Etsy, not even very expensive, even with international postal charges.  So if you ever come across these pans in charity shops or wherever, don’t dismiss them just because they look as if they might not work well.  If they are metal, chances are you can use them, though unfortunately the tin ones are usually rusty - though even that can be removed I think.  But the aluminium ones seem to work just fine if you prepare them well.

The chocolate cake in the earlier photo (not really a bundt pan, another pan also bought 2d hand but from a seller in the UK) was brilliant, I do want to tell you all about it!  It’s a recipe I just came across and it’s called ‘Magic Cake’.  As I made it I realized it’s simply a good ol’ pudding cake recipe, but baked in a mould til fairly firm, left til cool to touch in the pan, and then turned out!  Who’d a thunk it?  It was delicious especially with yet more ganache poured over it and served on the side.  I figure if it will depan cleanly from that pan, which is crappy quality ‘nonstick’, very lightweight and starting to peel, it could readily be used in a proper cast aluminium pan.  The beauty of it is the 3 layers.  The recipe suggests lots of different flavour variations.  I think you could make the ‘vanilla’ version and it would be like boston cream pie, especially if you dribbled chocolate ganache on it!  But without all the hassle of layering, making the confectioners custard etc.

Meanwhile - I have my eye on some more ‘Rose’ cakes but am trying also to work my way through the backlog of recipes I’ve accumulated in the last months!  What about the rest of you?  Any bundt adventures to relate?

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Posted: 05 April 2013 02:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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Interesting eag. That pan is very unique. Do you get most of your recipes from the web?  Do you have a favorite book for bundt recipes?

Yesterday I baked ‘low fat donuts’ from The Sweeter Side Of Amy’s Bakery. The recipe calls for a mini bundt pan. They came out delish with no adornment needed.

http://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Ware-Platinum-Anniversary-Bundtlette/dp/B004RB4SII/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1365184244&sr=1-1&keywords=nordicware+mini+bundt

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Posted: 06 April 2013 04:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Thanks so much for the link Flour Girl - am I right in thinking you sent the message of 11 June 2012?  That is so helpful, I have actually saved it in a Word doc - hope you don’t mind!

Yes I do get a lot of recipes from the Internet.  Plus I have 3 ‘bundt books’ - I can’t remember their names now though one is an ‘official’ Nordic Ware publication.  Many of the recipes I find on the Internet are actually from them I think.  Plus RHC has a lot, plus a book by Richard Sax on desserts has a lot.  That orange cake recipe is an example of how things on the Web have often come from books - I found the recipe on the web, then realised it was in Sax’s book.

But I’m developing my own set of priorities about recipes, for instance for the Nordic Ware ‘teacakes’ pan, which a lot of people complain about, and for other minibundt-type pans, I find it’s best to use quite a liquid batter because otherwise it’s really time-consuming to try and spoon batter into such tiny - and numerous! - holes.  The liquid batters seem to work fine and the cakes are very tender when they come out.  I must admit though they all have quite a lot of egg in them.  Egg increases tensile strength and thus lessens possibility of cake made from liquidy batter, sticking and tearing as one tries to turn them out of the pans especially minibundt type ones.

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Posted: 06 April 2013 09:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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Meant to say - I love the look of those bundtlette pans.  I do already have the ‘Fiesta’ equivalent so don’t feel I can justify the purchase but hey…  I also have 2 of the minibundt 12-hole pans (I think they are called ‘brownie pans’), I found them really useful as the minibundts turn out so easily and one is just the right size for these diet-conscious times!

Also - I found a recipe on the internet for Apple baked doughnuts which supposedly is the one from the cookbook you mention.  It sounds delicious, is that the one?  I wonder if you could put cinnamon in the coating sugar so it would be like cinnamon doughnuts, do you remember those?

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