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bundt cakes, glazes and fillings
Posted: 06 April 2013 02:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
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Flour Girl - 06 April 2013 03:08 PM

My recipe does have apple sauce and apple juice. The instructions say to spray the pan and then coat each well with caster sugar, not cinnamon. It gives the cake a nice, sweet taste.

This is the book I referenced:

http://www.amazon.com/Sweeter-Side-Amys-Bread/dp/0470170743/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1365260584&sr=1-1&keywords=the+sweeter+side+of+amy’s+bread

and here is the recipe (After reading the recipe I noticed they omitted the applesauce in the list of ingredients but included it in the instructions. So, I checked my book and here is the applesauce quantity: APPLESAUCE 265g / 9.35oz / 1 cup )

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2008/10/low-fat-applesauce-doughnuts-donuts-recipe.html

I halved the recipe and replaced 20g of butter with 16g of canola oil (for health reasons). YUM!!!

Thanks so much, again, for this information!  I did see and copy the recipe on ‘Serious Eats’ and wondered about the applesauce, now I can add that.

And thank you, thank you, thank you again, for the tip about putting minibundt or bundtlette pans on the scales - stroke of genius!  So I’ll just fill the first one to find out what is right, tare, and continue from there!

I searched and found the review you mentioned of the ‘Baking Style’ book on Rose’s blog. the recipe with Rose’s weight equivalents which was very helpful, especially if I see the book on sale or secondhand.  I don’t think I’ll buy it for now - as you know I am trying to cut down on cookery book consumption… : - )  Interesting to read ensuing comments about the book.  People do seem to get very het up about cups vs weights don’t they?  But it is quite true what someone said there, that it totally depends on how compacted the flour is and then how you get it into the cup, how much a cup of anything weighs.  But I still do use cup recipes a lot because I keep finding them! I’ve had to take on board switching from cups to ounces and sometimes back again, and then the metric system coming in over here (my kids don’t really know about pounds and ounces!!), to say nothing of differences between British pints and US pints…but I just make the switches automatically now. 

Years and years ago the ‘Scottish Women’s Rural Institute’ cookery book told me that a US cup = 4 oz flour, or 6 oz sugar, or 8 oz butter, and I must say that seems to work extremely well for me.  Butter comes in 1/4 kilo slabs over here, i.e. just a bit over 8 oz, so usually no need to measure or even weigh that, just cut a tiny bit off if recipe says 1 cup of butter - in fact usually I don’t bother, I think it’s a matter of 6 grams which is hardly going to make an appreciable difference.  It’s sometimes very handy especially for simple recipes like Victoria sponge or similar, just to be able to measure dry ingredients in cups.  I’ve had to use mugs sometimes when on holiday (a mug is roughly equal to a US cup) and that works fine too.  Obviously for professional bakers working in bulk, weight is the only weigh (!!) to go, and always has been, in the US as over here.


I do have ‘Kiss my Bundt’.  It is good in that it is very systematic and has basic recipes which can be tweaked.  It’s not so good in that it doesn’t have weights, and I’m not sure about some of the uses of fruit, though I have not yet tried them so that isn’t really a fair criticism.  The basic recipes with variations look very sound to me though.  One of them is the basic ‘1234’ formula which does recur again and again in recipes I encounter, and usually works very well for a big cake.  She uses only AP flour though, but increasingly I find I can just replace AP in recipes with my heat-treated cake flour, though maybe I should use half plain flour and half cake flour. 

I think the third book is called ‘Cake Simple’.  It does have weight measurements I’m glad to say.  I haven’t baked anything from it yet.  Time to try a new bundt recipe I think…so many bundts, so little time!

And no Richard Sax’ book doesn’t use weights unfortunately.  But the recipes do work nonetheless.  I should convert them as I use them.  You’d really like them I think, there are many involving cake and fruit!

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Posted: 06 April 2013 10:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
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eag - 06 April 2013 05:14 PM

And thank you, thank you, thank you again, for the tip about putting minibundt or bundtlette pans on the scales - stroke of genius!  So I’ll just fill the first one to find out what is right, tare, and continue from there!

I’m glad you find that helpful. Actually I cannot take credit for it. I learned it from Thomas Keller’s “Bouchon Bakery”. I, too, found it very helpful. I believe I got the 70g from his book too (or it might have been 140g and I used a smaller diameter well in the pan. The 70g seem to be perfect for the mini bundt pan I showed you.

I searched and found the review you mentioned of the ‘Baking Style’ book on Rose’s blog. the recipe with Rose’s weight equivalents which was very helpful, especially if I see the book on sale or secondhand.  I don’t think I’ll buy it for now - as you know I am trying to cut down on cookery book consumption… : - )  Interesting to read ensuing comments about the book.  People do seem to get very het up about cups vs weights don’t they?  But it is quite true what someone said there, that it totally depends on how compacted the flour is and then how you get it into the cup, how much a cup of anything weighs.  But I still do use cup recipes a lot because I keep finding them! I’ve had to take on board switching from cups to ounces and sometimes back again, and then the metric system coming in over here (my kids don’t really know about pounds and ounces!!), to say nothing of differences between British pints and US pints…but I just make the switches automatically now.


On amazon.com, that book was criticized for not providing weight measurements. One review contacted the author and she responded with HER weights:


1/2 pound butter, 8 ounces
1 cup granulated sugar, 7 ounces
1 cup confectioners’ sugar, 4 ounces
1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar, 7.5 ounces
1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar, 8.2 ounces
1 cup bleached all-purpose flour, 5.1 ounces
1 cup bleached cake flour, 4.4 ounces
1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour, 5.3 ounces
1 cup whole wheat flour, 4.9 ounces
1 cup cocoa powder, 3.4 ounces
1 large egg, 1.8 ounces (out-of-shell weight)

I tried the recipes in this book and they work. The produce beautiful bundt cakes. However, IMO, the taste was not extraordinary. Perhaps I should borrow this book again and give it another try,

Years and years ago the ‘Scottish Women’s Rural Institute’ cookery book told me that a US cup = 4 oz flour, or 6 oz sugar, or 8 oz butter, and I must say that seems to work extremely well for me.  Butter comes in 1/4 kilo slabs over here, i.e. just a bit over 8 oz, so usually no need to measure or even weigh that, just cut a tiny bit off if recipe says 1 cup of butter - in fact usually I don’t bother, I think it’s a matter of 6 grams which is hardly going to make an appreciable difference.  It’s sometimes very handy especially for simple recipes like Victoria sponge or similar, just to be able to measure dry ingredients in cups.  I’ve had to use mugs sometimes when on holiday (a mug is roughly equal to a US cup) and that works fine too.  Obviously for professional bakers working in bulk, weight is the only weigh (!!) to go, and always has been, in the US as over here.

That is good to know, thank you. Since using Rose’s recipes, I am anal about being precise. Different flours have different weights and the way the flour is measured will vary the weight too.  I always weigh flour. If the recipe is written in volume measurements, I scan the book to see if the author mentioned the method they use to measure flour. If not, I start at 140g for AP flour and take it from there.

I do have ‘Kiss my Bundt’.  It is good in that it is very systematic and has basic recipes which can be tweaked.  It’s not so good in that it doesn’t have weights, and I’m not sure about some of the uses of fruit, though I have not yet tried them so that isn’t really a fair criticism.  The basic recipes with variations look very sound to me though.  One of them is the basic ‘1234’ formula which does recur again and again in recipes I encounter, and usually works very well for a big cake.  She uses only AP flour though, but increasingly I find I can just replace AP in recipes with my heat-treated cake flour, though maybe I should use half plain flour and half cake flour.

 

I noticed some of the reviews mention she uses excess fat in her recipes. Do you find that to be the case?

I think the third book is called ‘Cake Simple’.  It does have weight measurements I’m glad to say.  I haven’t baked anything from it yet.  Time to try a new bundt recipe I think…so many bundts, so little time!

I’ll look for it, thank you.

And no Richard Sax’ book doesn’t use weights unfortunately.  But the recipes do work nonetheless.  I should convert them as I use them.  You’d really like them I think, there are many involving cake and fruit!

I placed a hold on it at my library. I’m looking forward to trying some of the recipes.

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Posted: 07 April 2013 05:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
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Flour Girl - 07 April 2013 01:53 AM

If the recipe is written in volume measurements, I scan the book to see if the author mentioned the method they use to measure flour. If not, I start at 140g for AP flour and take it from there.

Yes, I’ve noticed some of the newer US-author books do try and give info. like this.  Unfortunately Sax’ book was published in the early 90s and apparently he died soon after, so I don’t think he was ‘weight-conscious’.  But also have you noticed that some US authors just simply tell you what the weight equivalents are, without telling you how they actually measured, or if they were consistent in the way they measured.  I don’t always use them because I figure better just to do it the way I usually do it - which is to scoop a cup from a big bag or storage tin - and then see what that weighs, unless the recipe does actually specify how to do it differently.  I think I did do that earlier in this thread and discovered that my old SWRI guidelines were pretty much spot on, except my ‘cake flour’ is actually a bit heavier, I think because it’s in an enormous 35 lb bag so has gotten compressed.

You also mention taste - to me that is sooo important.  The challenge for me is to produce a bundt cake that looks terrific, preferably in a gorgeous, unusual tin, but also tastes divine!  Speaking of which, another success with one of my cheapie Etsy-purchased 2d hand ex-jello pans - turned out perfectly!  And for a wonder one of my recipes is exactly the right size, one that is basically 1/3 the standard ‘1 2 3 4’ recipe.  Orange cake again with icing-sugar and oj and orange liqueur glaze - yum!

I haven’t actually tried any of the ‘Kiss my Bundt’ recipes, just clocked they looked very sensible and like many of the ones I do use, in fact I think some are identical which is perhaps why I haven’t yet tried them.  But I looked again just now at the second section, the ‘pound cake’ section, which is specifically for the biggest bundt pans, like the Nordic Ware ‘Anniversary’ 12-cup, and it’s true she specifies 1 1/2 cups butter to 3 cups flour, which is a lot, though there are many other pound cake recipes out there with similar proportions, and I’m sure that would make a delicious, old-style heavy-duty poundcake, though I’d simply cut the butter - and sugar - in those recipes to one and two cups (equivalent weights) respectively.  But I wouldn’t say her other recipes are particularly heavy on the fat or oil - though certainly not lo-fat!  She even has a ‘vegan’ recipe that looks really good, unlike a lot I see in that category.  I’m not so sure about some of her filling ideas though.  I like the way she makes it clear that using a few basic recipes and tweaking them is a good idea and also some of her flavouring ideas are really interesting and unusual.  It would be easy enough to convert most of the recipes to weight because mostly they are the same basic recipes.  So - pros and cons.  But - the book is cheap! and small…. : - )

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Posted: 07 April 2013 12:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 49 ]
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Yes, I’ve noticed some of the newer US-author books do try and give info. like this.  Unfortunately Sax’ book was published in the early 90s and apparently he died soon after, so I don’t think he was ‘weight-conscious’.  But also have you noticed that some US authors just simply tell you what the weight equivalents are, without telling you how they actually measured, or if they were consistent in the way they measured.  I don’t always use them because I figure better just to do it the way I usually do it - which is to scoop a cup from a big bag or storage tin - and then see what that weighs, unless the recipe does actually specify how to do it differently.  I think I did do that earlier in this thread and discovered that my old SWRI guidelines were pretty much spot on, except my ‘cake flour’ is actually a bit heavier, I think because it’s in an enormous 35 lb bag so has gotten compressed.

Your way of measuring sounds pretty close to what is called Dip and Sweep. If I’m correct, that way of measuring derives 148g of unbleached AP flour according to Rose’s chart. Spooning flour into a cup should give you 130g of the same flour. If you have a recipe with several cups, the difference is significant. This is not an issue when you weigh the flour. Actually, Rose states sifting is usually unnecessary when you weigh flour.

I have many classic cookbooks and they don’t all easily translate from volume to weights. I’m looking forward to working with Mr. Sax’s recipes.

You also mention taste - to me that is sooo important.  The challenge for me is to produce a bundt cake that looks terrific, preferably in a gorgeous, unusual tin, but also tastes divine!  Speaking of which, another success with one of my cheapie Etsy-purchased 2d hand ex-jello pans - turned out perfectly!  And for a wonder one of my recipes is exactly the right size, one that is basically 1/3 the standard ‘1 2 3 4’ recipe.  Orange cake again with icing-sugar and oj and orange liqueur glaze - yum!

Yes, I agree. That is why I didn’t buy that book but I am interested in trying some of the recipes again and give it another chance. Your orange cake sounds fabulous! I’m getting disappointed because I have not seen new bundt pan designs for a while.

My daughter in law gave me this pan

http://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Ware-Pumpkin-Loaf-Pan/dp/B000QYN19M/ref=pd_sim_k_1

and I didn’t have success with it. Because this pan has to be inverted, and the bottom becomes the top of the cake, it didn’t work for my quick bread. My bread rose well about the level of the pan. I am thinking I will have to put much less batter in that pan next time I use it

I haven’t actually tried any of the ‘Kiss my Bundt’ recipes, just clocked they looked very sensible and like many of the ones I do use, in fact I think some are identical which is perhaps why I haven’t yet tried them.  But I looked again just now at the second section, the ‘pound cake’ section, which is specifically for the biggest bundt pans, like the Nordic Ware ‘Anniversary’ 12-cup, and it’s true she specifies 1 1/2 cups butter to 3 cups flour, which is a lot, though there are many other pound cake recipes out there with similar proportions, and I’m sure that would make a delicious, old-style heavy-duty poundcake, though I’d simply cut the butter - and sugar - in those recipes to one and two cups (equivalent weights) respectively.  But I wouldn’t say her other recipes are particularly heavy on the fat or oil - though certainly not lo-fat!  She even has a ‘vegan’ recipe that looks really good, unlike a lot I see in that category.  I’m not so sure about some of her filling ideas though.  I like the way she makes it clear that using a few basic recipes and tweaking them is a good idea and also some of her flavouring ideas are really interesting and unusual.  It would be easy enough to convert most of the recipes to weight because mostly they are the same basic recipes.  So - pros and cons.  But - the book is cheap! and small…. : - )

My library doesn’t have this book. I will get one of her recipes from the internet and give it a try.  Reviewers are saying this book is as small as a child’s book and has no pictures. Personally, I don’t care about pictures but it seems I am in the minority about that.

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Posted: 07 April 2013 02:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 50 ]
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Well it does have a few colour photos in fact but yes, it’s certainly not an expensively produced book, let’s put it that way!  But then it’s not expensive either.  It’s not in the same league with Rose’s books to be sure, but nonetheless I think it has its points if you are bundt-obsessed like me! 

Yes, I know what you mean about lack of new designs.  Not that I have every design made -  I’m not so keen on the ones that look like real things, I tend to prefer the more abstract geometric designs.  Though I wouldn’t mind having the now-vintage one with the pineapple trees, because for some reason it tickles my sense of humour!  And of course the ‘real’ ones are great for grandchildren, the cars, the trains, the butterflies, the village…!  Though - whisper it - I have discovered that many of these are available (cheaply) in silicone, which seems to work well enough for the small items. 

Having said that I think the one your dil gave you is absolutely adorable, it would be perfect for pumpkin cake and such a pleasure to use Nordic ware.  But I can see there would be a problem with the ‘hump’, even if you used less batter.  I think the answer might be a tactic I’ve had to resort to occasionally with bundt pans.  I’d advise using a full recipe for that size of loaf pan, generous in fact so that the sides of the cake when baked just about come up to the top of the pan, then unmould the cake onto its ‘hump’ then cut the ‘hump’ off, probably after it’s cooled a bit to avoid tearing and crumbling, using a fine-toothed long cake cutting knife and a very gentle sawing motion, going all round the cake over and over, sawing gently with one hand and holding the cake gently with the other, to keep the cut straight and keep cake from tearing, and letting the cake down gently on the cooling rack as the hump detaches.  It’s a bit nerve-wracking but it does work! It’s such a lovely tin, it might be worth it.  Also of course cook gets to eat the ‘hump’...!  wink

I would just love it if Nordic Ware - and Kaisercast and Wilton Dimensions - came in 6 cup sizes for all their ‘big bundt’ cast aluminium designs.  I have the Nordic ware duet and quartet tins and the Kaisercast smaller tins too which are about the same size - 3 cups? or even less - but I don’t actually find this such a useful size, though I have put the cakes into our chorus’s annual coffee morning bake sale and they do sell, so I suppose others must like the size.  It’s the lack of 6 cup size in fact that first led me to look at 2d hand tins.

Flour - yes.  I see I’ve contradicted myself in fact, on the 1 hand I say 4 oz per cup is fine, on the other when I actually measured, I found it was more like 5 oz - but that was dip and scoop method.  Strangely it all seems to work which does make me wonder a bit…!  Of course you’re right that 3 oz is a big difference for a cake that takes 3 cups of flour, ie many bundt recipes.  So nice that Rose’s recipes simply give you all the parameters, all you have to do is set your scales to grams, go down the column and it works!!  Because she’s so knowledgeable about different ways of measuring.

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Posted: 07 April 2013 03:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 51 ]
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Yes, I know what you mean about lack of new designs.  Not that I have every design made -  I’m not so keen on the ones that look like real things, I tend to prefer the more abstract geometric designs.  Though I wouldn’t mind having the now-vintage one with the pineapple trees, because for some reason it tickles my sense of humour!  And of course the ‘real’ ones are great for grandchildren, the cars, the trains, the butterflies, the village…!  Though - whisper it - I have discovered that many of these are available (cheaply) in silicone, which seems to work well enough for the small items.

I haven’t tried silicone pans yet. I’ve been using only Nordic Ware.  I haven’t even tried Kaiser yet. I like this pan made by Kaiser. If I ever bought a brand other than Nordic Ware, I would try this

http://www.amazon.com/Kaiser-KaiserCast-Classic-Mini-Bundform/dp/B0009JKECG/ref=sr_1_4?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1365357504&sr=1-4&keywords=kaiser+bundt+pan

Having said that I think the one your dil gave you is absolutely adorable, it would be perfect for pumpkin cake and such a pleasure to use Nordic ware.  But I can see there would be a problem with the ‘hump’, even if you used less batter.  I think the answer might be a tactic I’ve had to resort to occasionally with bundt pans.  I’d advise using a full recipe for that size of loaf pan, generous in fact so that the sides of the cake when baked just about come up to the top of the pan, then unmould the cake onto its ‘hump’ then cut the ‘hump’ off, probably after it’s cooled a bit to avoid tearing and crumbling, using a fine-toothed long cake cutting knife and a very gentle sawing motion, going all round the cake over and over, sawing gently with one hand and holding the cake gently with the other, to keep the cut straight and keep cake from tearing, and letting the cake down gently on the cooling rack as the hump detaches.  It’s a bit nerve-wracking but it does work! It’s such a lovely tin, it might be worth it.  Also of course cook gets to eat the ‘hump’...!  wink

GREAT IDEA!!! I will try that next pumpkin bread I bake. I should bake one for her red face

I would just love it if Nordic Ware - and Kaisercast and Wilton Dimensions - came in 6 cup sizes for all their ‘big bundt’ cast aluminium designs.  I have the Nordic ware duet and quartet tins and the Kaisercast smaller tins too which are about the same size - 3 cups? or even less - but I don’t actually find this such a useful size, though I have put the cakes into our chorus’s annual coffee morning bake sale and they do sell, so I suppose others must like the size.  It’s the lack of 6 cup size in fact that first led me to look at 2d hand tins.

Six-cup bundts are the cutest! I have this one

http://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Ware-Platinum-Collection-Aluminum/dp/B0000DE2UZ/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1365357704&sr=1-1&keywords=nordic+ware+6+cup+bundt

and just love it. I thought of getting the duo so I can make a whole recipe but, at this point, it would probably be more cost effective to buy another single 6-cup bundt.

In RHC, on page 469, Rose mentions she likes this pan

http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Mini-Angel-Food-Pan/dp/B001QJTU00/ref=sr_1_8?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1365358174&sr=1-8&keywords=wilton+mini+bundt

This is another version of that pan:

http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Mini-Fluted-Tube-Pan/dp/B0014GFCJ8/ref=pd_sim_hg_3

Also in RHC, on page 467, Rose discusses other fluted tube pan she likes

So nice that Rose’s recipes simply give you all the parameters, all you have to do is set your scales to grams, go down the column and it works!!  Because she’s so knowledgeable about different ways of measuring.

I couldn’t agree more smile

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Posted: 07 April 2013 05:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 52 ]
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Additional thought re your pumpkin pan:  If you fill it full enough of batter so the cake reaches up to the top of the sides of the pan when baked,  after you take it out of the oven you could simply saw off the ‘hump’ while the cake was still in the pan - much easier!  Or maybe turn it out just to be sure it wasn’t stuck, then flip it back into the pan and saw the ‘hump’ off.

Thanks so much for directing my attention to that page in RHC about other pans.  I did find the 2 Wilton ones on Amazon.co.uk but they seem to be quite small, the same size as the individual cakes in the ‘Duet/Quartet’ pans and my small Kaisercast pans.  Btw I do have that Kaisercast ‘Classic’ pan you admired, 2 of the small ones plus the big one.  I love them, they are a particularly elegant and simple design, and they work as well as Nordic Ware.  I also have several of the Wilton ‘Dimension’ pans and they work beautifully too.  My most extravagant purchase to date is the Wilton Dimensions Snowflake pan http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Cast-Large-Snowflake-Pan/dp/B000JVZUVE
It’s the bomb!  Though not a bundt pan I absolutely love it.  (It costs twice as much over here as in the link…that tells you how much I love it!  oh oh

I also have the Platinum 6 cup that you have, it’s really great isn’t it?  I have the cheapie lightweight red version of that too, so sometimes I do split a big recipe between the two.  Of course the cheapie one doesn’t work quite so well as the Platinum but both are good.  But if only the others I have, the Bavaria and the Heritage especially, but also the Kaisercast Classic, came in 6 cup sizes!

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Posted: 08 April 2013 01:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 53 ]
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Additional thought re your pumpkin pan:  If you fill it full enough of batter so the cake reaches up to the top of the sides of the pan when baked,  after you take it out of the oven you could simply saw off the ‘hump’ while the cake was still in the pan - much easier!  Or maybe turn it out just to be sure it wasn’t stuck, then flip it back into the pan and saw the ‘hump’ off.

That is exactly what I had to do the one time I used this pan. It seemed like I cut half the cake off. If I ever have to do that again I will save the part I removed and make crumbs of it to apply to the frosting of another cake, like a blackout cake. I do have a recipe which never rises. I stopped making it but maybe it would work in this pan???

Thanks so much for directing my attention to that page in RHC about other pans.  I did find the 2 Wilton ones on Amazon.co.uk but they seem to be quite small, the same size as the individual cakes in the ‘Duet/Quartet’ pans and my small Kaisercast pans.  Btw I do have that Kaisercast ‘Classic’ pan you admired, 2 of the small ones plus the big one.  I love them, they are a particularly elegant and simple design, and they work as well as Nordic Ware.  I also have several of the Wilton ‘Dimension’ pans and they work beautifully too.  My most extravagant purchase to date is the Wilton Dimensions Snowflake pan http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Cast-Large-Snowflake-Pan/dp/B000JVZUVE
It’s the bomb!  Though not a bundt pan I absolutely love it.  (It costs twice as much over here as in the link…that tells you how much I love it!  oh oh

That pan looks amazing!!! Love it!! It is really different too. The thing with bundts is, you can make a completely different cake but if you use the same old pan people are not going to know that until they taste it. Other cake pans don’t have that stigma.

I also have the Platinum 6 cup that you have, it’s really great isn’t it?  I have the cheapie lightweight red version of that too, so sometimes I do split a big recipe between the two.  Of course the cheapie one doesn’t work quite so well as the Platinum but both are good.  But if only the others I have, the Bavaria and the Heritage especially, but also the Kaisercast Classic, came in 6 cup sizes!

I do love it. I didn’t know how much I would like it until I un-molded it. It is really adorable.

How do you like the Bravia? Do you have any problem releasing the cake? Do the Kaiser Classic pans release easily?

What do you think of this pan? It is from Nordic Ware and is an exclusive of Williams Sonoma

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/blossom-bundt-cake-pan/?pkey=ccake-pans

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Posted: 08 April 2013 04:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 54 ]
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Flour Girl - 08 April 2013 04:56 AM

The thing with bundts is, you can make a completely different cake but if you use the same old pan people are not going to know that until they taste it. Other cake pans don’t have that stigma.

That’s a really good point.  Maybe that justifies my obsession with these tins!!

Flour Girl - 08 April 2013 04:56 AM

How do you like the Bravia? Do you have any problem releasing the cake? Do the Kaiser Classic pans release easily?

I love the Bavaria though I find the standard recipes for 10 cups don’t often really fill it completely - the bottom band gets left out (see my previous photos of Rose’s whipped cream cake for instance).  But that design is still really beautiful even without the bottom band.  Only problems with releasing are once in a while if the cake has things like apple or chocolate chips in, that might cause a tiny bit of sticking but never extensive, and in fact I think if I just use my new technique of brushing on pan goo and then spraying Wilton cake release on top of that, it would solve the problem. Also something I keep forgetting to do is to bang the filled pan on the counter before putting it in the oven, it really does reduce the air bubble flaw problem which is a bit more noticeable on that tin because of the nature of the design.

Flour Girl - 08 April 2013 04:56 AM

What do you think of this pan? It is from Nordic Ware and is an exclusive of Williams Sonoma

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/blossom-bundt-cake-pan/?pkey=ccake-pans

Well, I actually have this tin and did not get it at Williams-Sonoma, but rather at a UK online company (not Amazon I don’t think).  I’ve attached a photo, it works beautifully though it is a slightly alarming pattern!  My husband pretended to be afraid it would eat him up the first time he saw it!  As you can see turnout was perfect so far as sticking is concerned but this was an experimental filled gingerbread, using my decades-old wonderful gingerbread recipe which is very liquid, and it’s obvious from the picture the cake split when turned out, because the dough is very tender, not very ‘strong’ (only 1 egg!), the filling was ‘stronger’ and therefore I think warped the cake structure a bit, and I was impatient and didn’t let it sit in the pan long enough.  I’m sure with a more conventional recipe it would have been fine.  I.e. I don’t think it split because of the pan design, but rather because of my impatience and the interplay between cake batter and filling.

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Posted: 08 April 2013 11:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 55 ]
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I love the Bavaria though I find the standard recipes for 10 cups don’t often really fill it completely - the bottom band gets left out (see my previous photos of Rose’s whipped cream cake for instance).  But that design is still really beautiful even without the bottom band.  Only problems with releasing are once in a while if the cake has things like apple or chocolate chips in, that might cause a tiny bit of sticking but never extensive, and in fact I think if I just use my new technique of brushing on pan goo and then spraying Wilton cake release on top of that, it would solve the problem. Also something I keep forgetting to do is to bang the filled pan on the counter before putting it in the oven, it really does reduce the air bubble flaw problem which is a bit more noticeable on that tin because of the nature of the design.

Many of my recipes omit the bottom of the design too. I thought it was something wrong I was doing. What is a band?

My husband pretended to be afraid it would eat him up the first time he saw it!

There are worse ways to go wink

As you can see turnout was perfect so far as sticking is concerned but this was an experimental filled gingerbread, using my decades-old wonderful gingerbread recipe which is very liquid, and it’s obvious from the picture the cake split when turned out, because the dough is very tender, not very ‘strong’ (only 1 egg!), the filling was ‘stronger’ and therefore I think warped the cake structure a bit, and I was impatient and didn’t let it sit in the pan long enough.  I’m sure with a more conventional recipe it would have been fine.  I.e. I don’t think it split because of the pan design, but rather because of my impatience and the interplay between cake batter and filling.

It is BEAUTIFUL!! I love it. Why do you think the design is alarming?

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Posted: 08 April 2013 01:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 56 ]
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Well, just a bit ‘day of the Triffids/vegetable nightmare’  ohh  - but others agree with you and think it’s spectacular.  We have a couple of young postgrads staying with us who are keen to have me make a cake with that one, they love it.  I like it too, I just find it a bit - scarey!

By ‘band’ I just mean a decorative separate band of design round the top of the tin/bottom of the cake.

No band:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nordic-Ware-Heritage-Bundt-Pan/dp/B0021CEREA/ref=pd_sxp_grid_i_0_1

Band:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nordic-Ware-Holiday-Tree-Bundt/dp/B000J1BKZE/ref=sr_1_3?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1365436426&sr=1-3&keywords=christmas+tree+bundt

A lot of the trad German-type ones have a band also, sometimes quite wide.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Large-Bundt-Mould-Premium-Coating/dp/B00ABHUFUC/ref=sr_1_31?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1365436512&sr=1-31&keywords=bundt

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Posted: 09 April 2013 01:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 57 ]
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I see, When you said band, I thought you were talking about the bands put around pans to prevent a mound.

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Posted: 09 April 2013 03:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 58 ]
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Those sound interesting.  Could you tell me more about them?  I presume they aren’t for bundt cakes?

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Posted: 09 April 2013 12:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 59 ]
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eag - 09 April 2013 06:53 AM

Those sound interesting.  Could you tell me more about them?  I presume they aren’t for bundt cakes?


Rose has a line of silicone bands that, when placed around pans, inhibit the formation of a mound and create more-level layers. I have 2 of them

http://www.amazon.com/Rose-Levy-Beranbaum-Bakeware-Heavenly/dp/B000YHJJPQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1365519088&sr=8-1&keywords=rose’s+cake+strips

I also have these strips:

http://www.amazon.com/Magi-Cake-Set-Cake-Strips-Medium/dp/B002U0LE4O/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1365519149&sr=1-1&keywords=magic+cake+strips

These come 2 to the box. They need to be soaked before applied to the pan. The 2 bands can be combined, by clips, to form one band and go around large pans.

Rose’s are made of silicone and are applied like a rubber band to the pan. Actually, it would be worth trying on bundt pans. I can do that the next bundt I make and let you know. I believe Rose’s bands are for 8-9 inch pans

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Posted: 09 April 2013 12:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 60 ]
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I hope you don’t mind me chiming in on this discussion, but I have been interested in reading about your bundt cakes and variety of tins as I like them too!  I have a set of Rose’s silicone bands which work very well, but I don’t think you can buy them in the UK, a friend ordered mine for me and we shared the postage/shipping which was quite expensive actually.  You can buy something similar in Lakeland though, and I have one of these too, it is a silver fabric of some sort which does a similar job to Rose’s , but is not quite as easy to use, but it works out less expensive.  I haven’t tried mine out on Bundt tins, I’m not sure it would be suitable because of the shape.  Worth a go though.

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