EGGS!!
Posted: 04 August 2008 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi everyone!

Need some help.

How do one store eggs. I mean, there are recipies asking for half a dozen eggwhites only or nine eggyolks and so on. So one seperates the eggs…and freeze the remaining part?? How do you guys freeze the eggs. and do they work well when defrosted?

In Norway you can buy eggyolks or eggwhites in 5 kg packs from the professional bakers shop. Anyone familier with this. Does all of you use fresh eggs?

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Posted: 04 August 2008 09:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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if you can be sure that the eggs are recently cracked or completely frozen then I guess it would be ok to buy the mixed eggs. However, it is easy to store whites and yolks to use whenever you are ready.

if you only need to keep them for up to a week then an airtight container in the fridge should be just fine.

for freezing you can pop the whites into a freezer container and thaw in the fridge when needed. i think hector may freeze in ice trays for easy serving management.

yolks need a bit more care for freezing. for each yolk you must add 1/8 tsp of sugar in order to keep the yolk from coagulating when thawed. remember to remove the equal amount of sugar from your recipe when you finally use the yolks.

someone correct me if i am wrong on the amount.

jen

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Posted: 04 August 2008 09:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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You can freeze egg yolks by mixing in 1 teaspoon of sugar for each yolk, and freezing them. Ice cube trays are convenient for this purpose. Just be sure to keep the frozen yolks well wrapped in plastic so they don’t dry out.

I have found that egg yolks and egg whites will store for at least a week or two in my refrigerator, by which time I have had ample opportunity to use them in ice cream, baked goods, or general cooking.

I always use fresh eggs. I can purchase just egg whites from the local grocery store, but I am too thrifty to pay extra. I’d rather separate them myself.

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Posted: 04 August 2008 10:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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In his book, “On Food and Cooking,” Harold McGee says you can use salt, sugar or acid to keep the yolks from getting gloppy in the freezer (p.83). The proportions are for a pint (or half-litre) of egg yolk: either 1 teaspoon salt (5 grams), or 1 tablespoon of sugar (15g) or 4 tablespoons lemon juice (60 ml). I guess my original estimate of 1 teaspoon per yolk was a bit excessive.

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Posted: 04 August 2008 10:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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you must freeze eggs!!!!!  my take is that I rather have them frozen than sitting in my fridge for months.

I buy a 5 dozen pack of eggs each time and use as much as I can when I have a baking project.  The excess is separated and frozen.  I don’t always add sugar to the yolks, but the amount is 1/2 tsp of superfine sugar per yolk.  I follow that 1 yolk is 18.6 grams, and 1 yolk with 1/2 tsp of superfine sugar is 20.3 grams.  Subtract this amount of sugar from your recipe.  Obviously, if I am going to make carbonara, or other preparation where you don’t add sugar to the yolk, I don’t use my sugared frozen yolks.

Always thaw your whites and yolks prior to using.

If you don’t sugar your frozen yolks, then you should only use them in preparations where you will first beat the yolks with sugar, without any other ingredients (whites, milk, flour, etc).  The direct and exclusive contact of sugar will re-emulsify the clumpy frozen yolks.  This is my case with biscuit and genoise.  I always re-emulsify the clumpy frozen yolks with some sugar first, then continue with the recipe steps.

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Posted: 05 August 2008 04:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks for the help everyone!

Hector, do you mix your yolks and the sugar..and then freeze? One has to….in order to get the sugar mixed in. (No whole eggyolks)? But that doesn’t matter right. As long as you weigh the ingredients? I would rather freeze in containers then ice-cube trays. As I don’t have THAT many trays grin

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Posted: 05 August 2008 05:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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yes, you gently mix the yolks with the sugar, breaking they yolks basically, not whipping.  Then freeze.

I don’t freeze whites or yolks in ice cube trays.  I freeze them in shallow containers, then unmold and vacuum pack.  With a cleaver, it is pretty easy to break/cut the frozen eggs.

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Posted: 05 August 2008 06:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I find that I usually have whites over and freeze them in plastic containers.  If I do this I make sure I mark how many are in the container, ie. 3 egg whites,  otherwise I would forget how many I’d put in!  Then I defrost in the fridge, it doesn’t take long, and usually use them for merigues, I find they whip up really well after being frozen. Rose says she keeps them for as long as a year , I personally haven’t kept them this long yet!

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Posted: 05 August 2008 02:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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jen68 - 05 August 2008 12:34 AM

if you can be sure that the eggs are recently cracked or completely frozen then I guess it would be ok to buy the mixed eggs. However, it is easy to store whites and yolks to use whenever you are ready.

if you only need to keep them for up to a week then an airtight container in the fridge should be just fine.

for freezing you can pop the whites into a freezer container and thaw in the fridge when needed. i think hector may freeze in ice trays for easy serving management.

yolks need a bit more care for freezing. for each yolk you must add 1/8 tsp of sugar in order to keep the yolk from coagulating when thawed. remember to remove the equal amount of sugar from your recipe when you finally use the yolks.

someone correct me if i am wrong on the amount.

jen

I have frozen lots of egg yolks and didn’t add sugar will I have a problem when I thaw them?  I wasn’t aware that you needed to add sugar.  Thanks for the information.

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Posted: 05 August 2008 03:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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just want to point out that because I measure by weight, I don’t count how many eggs are frozen.

Ramona, frozen yolks become clumpy when thawed and it will curdle immediately when in contact with other ingredients except sugar, salt, or acid.  If the first thing touching your thawed yolks is sugar, salt, or acid, you will be fine.

If you need to use whole eggs, and no sugar, salt and acid, run them quickly thru your food processor and the white and yolks will become like freshly cracked eggs but lightly beaten.

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Posted: 07 August 2008 07:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Here’s all you ever wanted or needed to know about eggs.  Freezer storage is found at the bottom of the page.
http://www.baking911.com/pantry/eggs.htm

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