1 of 2
1
Macarons with Rose’s Classic Buttercream (+ a few other treats)
Posted: 15 February 2013 04:39 PM   [ Ignore ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3127
Joined  2010-04-25

Hi, all!

I made my first macarons.  The sad little things are cracked and footless—sadly, these are the “good” ones—but even the cosmetically worst tasted fabulous!  I used BraveTart’s recipe (http://bravetart.com/recipes/Macarons) and tips (but not her buttercream).  The macarons kept very well in the refrigerator and were fabulous even 2 days later, so I was very glad to know that. 

For the buttercream, I based it upon Rose’s classic buttercream (as I had leftover yolks), but, for the sugar water, I used some of the very orange-y leftover syrup from making orangettes (pictured below).  I added cardamon and rose flower water for a middle eastern flair!

If you haven’t made macarons, they are super-fun to do, and even if they look cruddy, they taste great with the perfect crispy, chewy texture (hopefully, that is what they are supposed to have).  The tips and links from the recipe filled me with confidence, and the results make me very excited to make them again!  I’m planning on making some chocolate ones with mocha light whipped ganache or perhaps peanut butter ganache.  Or maybe Midnight Ganache with brandied cherries!!!!  Rose’s fabulous fillings are made for these things—I’m tellin’ ya’!

And just for fun, here’s a pic of my Christmas gifting treats—orangettes (compiled from several recipes, but super-easy if anyone wants to know); Sugar & Spice nuts from Smitten Kitchen (http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/12/sugar-and-spice-candied-nuts/), which were very popular indeed; and truffles, with the ganache using the “solids” from a can of refrigerated coconut milk replacing the cream and lots of rum!  The truffles & orangettes were my first venture into tempering chocolate—it turns out to be not very difficult, and it’s snappy texture makes it really worth doing.

—ak



Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 February 2013 06:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  339
Joined  2009-01-22

I really shouldn’t be looking at these posts when I’m so hungry. Seeing these creations of yours just made it worse. I love the looks of all of them, but the orangettes look especially delicious! Working with tempered chocolate is so much fun. Nice work, Anne!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 February 2013 09:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  606
Joined  2012-01-12

Those look so good. Nice work. I love them.grin

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2013 12:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4741
Joined  2008-04-16

Everything looks delicious!  Love the satiny-smooth chocolate coating on your orangettes, and the buttercream in the macarons sounds interesting and delicious.  And yes, your crispy-chewy macaron texture sounds just right.  smile

I must admit I’m rosewater-challenged, every time I’ve tried to make something with it, it just hasn’t tasted right.  Then I went to Istanbul, where we visited pastry shops daily to try new pastries, and it finally dawned on me that while I love the fragrance and concept of using rosewater, I don’t actually like the taste of it.  Everyone else thought it was fine or even great, but it just tasted off to me.  Go figure.

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Ultimate Cinnamon Rolls

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2013 01:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3127
Joined  2010-04-25

Thanks, gang!!

@MP - The orangettes are super easy!  Peel the oranges, slice the rinds, blanche (1 minute) & drain—do this 3x in succession, then simmer the rinds in 1:1 water sugar (sugar dissolved) uncovered for about 1 hour or until they look translucent.  Set on racks to drain for 24 hours, turning after about 12 hours.  And I agree re tempered chocolate!  It’s such a thrill when it snaps!

@Prettycake - Thanks for the macaron inspiration!  Hopefully, with practice, mine will be beautiful like yours!!

@Julie - My friend Penny doesn’t like the rosewater, either, so you have company in your boat.  My boss who bought me the rosewater introduced me to it by putting a little in a glass of lemonade and asking if I could pick out the unusual flavor, which I couldn’t, but it was tasty!  I tripped when she said it was rosewater, because I’d never heard of it.

—ak

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2013 02:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  606
Joined  2012-01-12

Hi admin,

I failed at least 8 times miserably learning the macaron. One has to know where mistakes were made, that way we won’t make the same mistake in the next attemp. I practiced endlessly. Then one day it hit me, from then on my macaroons came out perfect. You are getting there. Just keep practicing. Even if they don’t look perfect they still taste great, it’s one of those where looks do not affect taste. Nice job though on your creations. Very nice.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2013 03:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  606
Joined  2012-01-12

Actually I LOVE rose water. I think it taste better than vanilla plus the nice fragrance. It goes well combined w/ mild lemon. I have made rose water and also bought it that is made in Iraq.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 February 2013 12:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  153
Joined  2007-11-21

Oh, am I glad to see your great endeavor Anne! I have done them once and after buying mats, Herme book and another book, and all sorts of fancy flavorings, still haven’t had the nerve to try again. But, Prettycake and you have inspired me. I will do it soon, after a project I have going now. When that is over I will have Macaron project!

 Signature 

http://bakingsorceressapprentice.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 February 2013 01:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3127
Joined  2010-04-25

@prettycake - I think mine needed to sit longer.  This was the last tray to go in, and they were hte least cracked and had little “hints” of feet, so I will leave the next batch out until dry.  I’ve seen some recipes where they heat the oven to 400, put the pan in, turn it off for 5 m inutes, then finish cooking at 300—something about a steam boost with that first high heat?  Do you do this?

@Joan - Do it! Do it!  They’re so yummy! And everyone loves them because they’re so light and wonderful.  Even my 1st tray to go in, where the tops toally caved in, were loved, so you can’t og wrong!

I think my next batch will have strawberry cloud cream in them.  Or creamy dreamy with strawberry added.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 February 2013 05:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2011-06-02

Anne, how long did you leave the macarons to dry? I usually leave for 30-60 minutes, until dry on top. Too much or to little time can cause problems.
I used Tartlette’s method and they work perfectly everytime, even the first time! I think the most difficult part is the mixing, which if you have problems with, you could try using the italian meringue method [hot sugar syrup]. It is slightly easier but I prefer the look of the french method; I think the macarons rise higher and the feet are nice and straight.

Anyway they look soooo cute, and I bet they taste even better!

edit: some tips here: http://issuu.com/helened/docs/demystifyingmacarons

 Signature 

McBrownie.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 February 2013 05:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  606
Joined  2012-01-12
Anne in NC - 17 February 2013 05:04 PM

@prettycake - I think mine needed to sit longer.  This was the last tray to go in, and they were hte least cracked and had little “hints” of feet, so I will leave the next batch out until dry.  I’ve seen some recipes where they heat the oven to 400, put the pan in, turn it off for 5 m inutes, then finish cooking at 300—something about a steam boost with that first high heat?  Do you do this?

@Joan - Do it! Do it!  They’re so yummy! And everyone loves them because they’re so light and wonderful.  Even my 1st tray to go in, where the tops toally caved in, were loved, so you can’t og wrong!

I think my next batch will have strawberry cloud cream in them.  Or creamy dreamy with strawberry added.

IMHO,  it depends on the humidity and weather…. I let mine dry for no longer than 40 and this was last December.  Last Summer it only took like 20 mins.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 February 2013 10:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3127
Joined  2010-04-25

@McBrownie - Thanks so much!  I have read Tartelette’s method and her article—in fact, I just read her article yesterday!!!  I’ve been googling macaron tips and watching macaron YouTube videos like crazy—they’re so fun to read about!  And yes, they were VERY tasty, if I do say so me-self (and, in fact, I do)!!!!!

@Prettycake - Thanks again—I’ll keep the humidity in mind and try to go by the look and feel of the shells, knowing the time can vary.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 February 2013 11:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1146
Joined  2009-11-24

Great work and great reporting.  I really love the look of the orangettes.  I look forward to doing something similar now (bucket list growing).

 Signature 

So many recipes - so little time.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 February 2013 11:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3127
Joined  2010-04-25

Thanks, Renee!

Here’s my 2nd batch.  I didn’t want to give them their own post, since they have no Rose component to them.  These are chocolate macarons with the leftover frosting from this cake:  http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/4894/  Unfortunately, they didn’t use ALL the leftover frosting, so I still have some left.

This batter was a little thick, and I was afraid I’d have a total failure. I aged the egg whites, and I’m wondering if I should have started with 90g+ so that evaporating the liquid with the aging process would bring them to 90g.  The batter “collapsed into itself” in the bowl, but the piped macarons didn’t on their own, and they took about 25 minutes to cook, which is long.  To make them chocolate, I removed 15g (2T) of powdered sugar and added 15g of cocoa powder, but I think I should have used 10g, as the E. Guittard can says it’s 5g per tablespoon, which seems to be an extremely loose tablespoon to me. At any rate, they were completely crunchy after cooking, but softened after aging for 2 days.  In the end, they’re a little denser and a little chewier than they should be, but they’re still very delicious, not too sweet (because of the cocoa powder) and they have feet and no cracks!!!!!

Macarons are super-fun and addicting (to make and eat) and would pair well with lots of Rose’s fillings & garnishes—plus it’s a great way to use up egg whites and all that powdered sugar you bought before learning how to make Rose’s frostings!!!!!

 photo 100_5323.jpg

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 February 2013 11:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4741
Joined  2008-04-16

Congratulations, Anne, they look great and sound tasty!  You’re really getting the hang of these quickly smile

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Ultimate Cinnamon Rolls

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 February 2013 11:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  606
Joined  2012-01-12

Hi Anne,

That is a great improvement from the first batch.. that is so nice.  Good job.  they look so tasty. Feet or no feet,  they taste the same. I think you got it now…

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
Back to top