1 of 2
1
Starbucks’ Pastries
Posted: 09 March 2013 11:44 PM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27

Does anyone else find these almost inedible? It must be next to impossible to make good pastries on a large scale.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 March 2013 12:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4838
Joined  2008-04-16

Yup, I’m with you on that one.  In addition to the scale, nothing ever, ever seems freshly baked.

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  Peanut Butter Cups, All Grown Up

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 March 2013 01:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1211
Joined  2009-11-24

And, it is so sad that people buy these things.  I think they rarely, if ever, have exposure to really good pastries.  Do you think it is because of the scale or is it that they have made compromises?  Lack of freshness is problem for sure as the items are not baked there.

 Signature 

So many recipes - so little time.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 March 2013 03:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
CRenee - 10 March 2013 04:50 PM

Do you think it is because of the scale or is it that they have made compromises?  Lack of freshness is problem for sure as the items are not baked there.

I make the charitable assumption that the problem is greater than I can imagine. Perhaps delicate baked goods can’t survive being manufactured, packaged, and distributed to so many stores, and maybe the timeframe from manufacture to sale is long enough that they need a lot of chemical engineering to remain somewhat palatable. I’d really like to know, but I’m not sure their PR department would respond to the question “Why are your pastries so awful?” grin

I was likewise recently wondering why every hamburger in town is so dry and densely packed, and decided that maybe a properly loose-packed patty is too fragile to survive in a busy kitchen environment. I know that when I place one on the grill, if I’m not careful, it will fall apart.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 March 2013 06:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  609
Joined  2007-11-27

I’ve been there when the staff is taking the pastries and other edibles out of the wrapped containers they are shipped to the stores in.

Being in the food service industry, I’ve started to realize that there are huge food production companies that manufacture an enormous variety of things, and some places pass these off as house-made, while others rely on the convenience of just being able to order it in.  My sales rep for one distributor has told me a large bakery in my area buys in lemon bars, yet the bakery passes them off as made in house (this conversation started because I was looking for Natalie’s brand lemon juice, she didn’t stock it, wanted to know what I was going to use it for, and that’s how we got from lemon juice to lemon bars….if you don’t have the staff or the time for juicing fresh lemons, Natalie’s brand is the only way to go).  I’ve shared space with various caterers and deliver to lots of local restaurants and it doesn’t surprise me when I see Sysco boxes of frozen hamburgers - Sysco has been selling the little burger sliders for years now.  Those sliders come pre-fabbed down to the bun and cheese - fully cooked and ready to go.  So it wouldn’t surprize me to find out that those pastries are made a hundred miles away, several days earlier and trucked in.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 March 2013 10:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  715
Joined  2012-01-12

This does not bother me. That is what business is about, as long as it is not spoiled or bad. Should we really expect people to go to a patisserie like Laduree or Pierre Hermes everyday ?to get a cup of coffee and a pastry? I would think that people will buy, eat and like them regardless how it was brought to the store. I don’t think people will buy pastries on a daily basis at $6.00/slice of lemon pound cake or muffin only because it was made by a well known Pastry Chef, esp people who work at minimum wage or middle class working people. To me it’s what people are willing to buy and being able to afford. With this economy, I won’t be too snooty about it, instead consider what is practical and what works for people. They earn their money so they should decide where and how they spend it, but that’s just me.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 March 2013 10:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  13
Joined  2010-03-31

I don’t know which Starbucks outlet make its own pastries, but I know lots of Starbucks outlets don’t make their pastries themselves. I also know that these pastries spent a long time in the freezer/refrigerator during the storage and transportation phase. That’s probably why it sucks? Things dry out in the fridge/freezer.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 March 2013 10:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  13
Joined  2010-03-31
prettycake - 11 March 2013 01:33 AM

This does not bother me. That is what business is about, as long as it is not spoiled or bad. Should we really expect people to go to a patisserie like Laduree or Pierre Hermes everyday ?to get a cup of coffee and a pastry? I would think that people will buy, eat and like them regardless how it was brought to the store. I don’t think people will buy pastries on a daily basis at $6.00/slice of lemon pound cake or muffin only because it was made by a well known Pastry Chef, esp people who work at minimum wage or middle class working people. To me it’s what people are willing to buy and being able to afford. With this economy, I won’t be too snooty about it, instead consider what is practical and what works for people. They earn their money so they should decide where and how they spend it, but that’s just me.

1. You think that starbucks is offering quality at fair value?
  You really think that for the price Starbucks is charging that’s the quality of pastries people deserve?

2. Because of the current state of the economy, Starbucks’ pastries today are mediocre at best. So it was actually better in the past?

3. You are offering a false dichotomy here: Starbucks or Pierre Herme. Accept no other.
  Personally, I don’t think Pierre Herme is for everyone. Not for me, at least. Oftentimes, it’s just too complicated for no good reason.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2013 01:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  715
Joined  2012-01-12

OK,  not everything is for everyone.  If I don’t like it, I won’t buy it. as simple as that.  I’ve had Starbucks pastries.  It is not the best,  but it is not the worst but I won’t go on a crusade . To each its own.  JMHO

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2013 01:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  715
Joined  2012-01-12
karin - 11 March 2013 01:55 AM

I don’t know which Starbucks outlet make its own pastries, but I know lots of Starbucks outlets don’t make their pastries themselves. I also know that these pastries spent a long time in the freezer/refrigerator during the storage and transportation phase. That’s probably why it sucks? Things dry out in the fridge/freezer.

Yes, we all know they don’t make them at locations.  It was sort of mention in the beginning or somewhere.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2013 11:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4838
Joined  2008-04-16
Jeanne - 10 March 2013 09:33 PM

Being in the food service industry, I’ve started to realize that there are huge food production companies that manufacture an enormous variety of things, and some places pass these off as house-made, while others rely on the convenience of just being able to order it in.

Likewise, it occurred to me, when working from Mozza’s cookbook, that “ordering in” has become the standard in the restaurant industry, and the way to stand out from the crowd is to vertically integrate and make your own food.  Mozza makes their own breads/pizza crusts, sausage, desserts, etc. 

I was so disappointed to find out that a local pizza restaurant, which produces sourdough crusts and makes a big deal out of marketing their sourdough, doesn’t make them on the premises, but rather buys parbaked sourdough crusts from a supplier.  I haven’t even eaten there yet but I felt a sense of loss when I found that out- I think I had been imagining that at some point I might eat there and then if they weren’t busy, maybe strike up a conversation with the dough person about feeding schedules, challenges of sourdough, etc.  I would have had to chat with a freezer full of shrink-wrapped crusts…

if you don’t have the staff or the time for juicing fresh lemons, Natalie’s brand is the only way to go

good to know, thanks, Jeanne!

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  Peanut Butter Cups, All Grown Up

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2013 12:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Julie - 11 March 2013 02:00 PM

which produces sourdough crusts and makes a big deal out of marketing their sourdough, doesn?t make them on the premises

I think most restaurants think of themselves as providing a format or a stage, and quality of the products needs to be merely adequate. The sum of the parts will be greater than the whole. The economics has got to be compelling; developing your own dough formula and devoting the staff to producing it has got to be expensive.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2013 01:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  913
Joined  2009-01-04

I’ve never had their pastries (too expensive!) but I can tell you that they have the BEST hot chocolate around! Lol

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2013 02:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3171
Joined  2010-04-25

I once (very politely) pointed out to a Starbuck’s employee several flies buzzing around under the glass of the pastry case, and they said, “Yeah, there’s always a few flies in there.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2013 02:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  639
Joined  2008-01-24

My biggest problem with Starbucks is that they don’t deliver their signature product very well. Shouldn’t the coffee/espresso at least be good? It’s all kind of ‘meh’. Not so great. Not terrible. Not worth the price.

 Signature 

“This pizza is a symphony of flavors”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2013 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  13
Joined  2010-03-31
prettycake - 11 March 2013 04:40 AM
karin - 11 March 2013 01:55 AM

I don’t know which Starbucks outlet make its own pastries, but I know lots of Starbucks outlets don’t make their pastries themselves. I also know that these pastries spent a long time in the freezer/refrigerator during the storage and transportation phase. That’s probably why it sucks? Things dry out in the fridge/freezer.

Yes, we all know they don’t make them at locations.  It was sort of mention in the beginning or somewhere.

Don’t think they could make them at each and every location, because the places they rent tend to be small. It is acceptable if they make it themselves at a central location and then distribute it to the various outlets. Instead, the standard operating procedure seems to be outsourcing to the cheapest supplier, which seems to have no regards for ingredients quality and most importantly packaging and refrigeration suitable for long-distance transportation. This is what makes the pastries, which are already mediocre due to the ingredients used, to be significantly dried out upon arrival.

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
Back to top