any japanese bakers here? Need some clarification on japanese cake flour
Posted: 02 April 2013 04:01 AM   [ Ignore ]
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so i ran out of swans down cake flour and the other option i had here was Snowflake cake flour ( unbleached as per my research) and Hakurikiko violet cake flour by nissin,  from japan . I asked around on the net and everyone claims that since nissin promotes it as their whiter flour which is specific for bakes it has to be bleached and low gluten. However i tried this for baking the white velvet cake and disaster!!!! Not only did my cake develop a chewy proper golden crust! Which i could even peel away! But the cake it self was kind of dense ? And dried out very fast on sitting, not at all like how it was when i used swans down. i dont know if it was the baking powder that s the culprit cause i weighed the baking powder( dont know what possessed me! All i have is a salter scale ) I tried a second batch again ( weighed the baking powder again! ) And still came out the same way. Cant for the life of me figure out why! Someone please tell me more about this flour…or is it the baking powder ? .. im thinking since i cant get bleached cake flour and if the japanese flour is the culprit maybe i should try subbing with all purpose and potato starch?  Have attached a link for a picture of the flour i used.

http://www.alexfish.bg/en/category/hakurikiko-violet-225-41.html

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Posted: 02 April 2013 12:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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chocoholic - 02 April 2013 07:01 AM

everyone claims that since nissin promotes it as their whiter flour which is specific for bakes it has to be bleached

Cake flour doesn’t work its magic because it’s bleached, it works because it’s bleached with a form of chlorine, hence we refer to it as “chlorinated flour”.  There are other ways to make flour appear white without using chlorine, so that fact that this flour is whiter doesn’t really give you any useful information about it.

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Posted: 02 April 2013 05:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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that is a very good point charlesT. thanks for the info… hope someone else chimes in and lets me know what hakurikiko violet is bleached with!

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Posted: 03 April 2013 03:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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This wiki entry explains the flour type numbering system
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flour

Since your Japanese company uses a recognized number I think it is safe to assume they are following the ISO. I think you should also assume that no flour sold in Japan has been bleached. I believe it is only legal in North America.

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Posted: 10 April 2013 04:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Hakurikiko is not the same as cake flour. It is much closer to AP flour. If all you can get is hakurikiko, then you should add potato starch (or corn starch) to it. I made plenty of cakes with hakurikiko though and never really had a problem. I guess it depends on the recipe you are using.

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Posted: 11 April 2013 12:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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emikochN73 what!! Now thats news to me!! everyone told me its closer to cake flour since its gluten content is 8 percent and they ve written that its whitest flour, and on the cover it shows for cakes etc… =/ Have you tried any rose cakes using hakurikiko violet?

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Posted: 11 April 2013 05:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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oh! I just noticed you are talking about a specific type of Hakurikiko. I always thought that all Hakurikiko was the same. I have never seen this “violet” one. I have only ever used the regular Nissin Hakurikiko that you can find in most supermarkets in Japan. http://www.nisshin.com/products/detail/4902110041606.html (sorry, in Japanese only). Taking a quick look online, I see that the Hakurikiko I always used has 7.7% protein content whereas Violet has 7.1%. Super Violet has only 6.6%. I am not a flour expert so I don’t know what any of this means, but I just know that when I used hakurikiko in my baking, my cakes were always a bit “heavy” and dense (not that it’s a bad thing!). Anyway, I didn’t realize there were other kinds of hakurikiko and I apologize for my misunderstanding. I guess I was thinking of a different flour. Please ignore my previous post. It was just based on my experience. Not actual knowledge.

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