White ganache with strawberry conserve
Posted: 06 April 2013 06:59 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m thinking of making a slightly more elegant version of a strawberry shortcake with Rose’s Buttermilk Country Cake frosted with White Ganache (made with creme fraiche and flavored with her Strawberry Conserve). In The Cake Bible, the White Ganache is mostly whipped cream with a small amount of white chocolate to stabilize it (8 oz cream to 3 oz white choc.) . Has anyone had enough experience with this recipe to tell me if it would work if I folded in some Strawberry Conserve to the finished ganache? Is a 1/4 to 1/2 c. for one full recipe reasonable? I’m thinking jam shouldn’t be a problem, because the pectin would work together with the chocolate to further stabilize the whipped cream.

My other question is about how well the White Ganache frosts and holds up at room temperature. I’m not doing any fancy decorations—just frosting the cake (and doing a few swirls if it can do that). I would like to leave this cake at room temperature though, since it’s a butter cake and would be kind of hard if cold. The Cake Bible says the ganache can be left 1 day at room temperature. Anyone had any experience with this? I’m just a little skeptical, I guess, because it’s essentially whipped cream.

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Posted: 07 April 2013 12:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Now I’m also considering a variation of The Cake Bible’s Raspberry Jam Cream, using Strawberry Conserve and Hector Wong’s method of stabilizing whipped cream—whip it to soft peaks at room temperature, chill it for a day, then whip to stiff peaks. This method should produce a whipped cream that can stand at room temperature for four hours.

Any suggestions on which frosting would be best for my cake? I’d like a frosting that has a texture at least sort of like whipped cream Is the white ganache too dense, or does it still taste sort of like whipped cream? The frosting also needs to be stable enough, so I can bring the butter cake to room temperature or warm enough so it won’t be hard. Would the Jam Cream stabilized with Hector’s method cut it? Four hours should be plenty of time for the cake to warm up. Oh…but the other variable I forgot was that I still want to make the whipped cream with creme fraiche (the homemade version…a tsp of buttermilk added to the cream and then letting that sit for a day or two). I think the tanginess of the creme fraiche would complement the buttermilk cake perfectly.

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Posted: 07 April 2013 11:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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The jam cream and cloud cream recipes say they only hold at room temp for a couple of hours, however using creme fraiche may extend that, both from the standpoint of preservation (the acid inhibits microbe growth) and stability, as the creme fraiche is thicker than cream.  If you scald your cream before culturing, that will also help with preservation and thickness.

Adding conserve to the white ganache sounds perfectly reasonable, but I haven’t tried it so can’t confirm whether it has the stability you want.  I trust Rose’s room temp guideline for the white ganache, but I don’t know what your changes would do to that- as with the jam cream and cloud cream, the acidity and thickness of creme fraiche may work in your favor.

My best advice would be to make up a small test batch and put a scoop out on a plate and subject it to the same conditions you would like to put the cake through:  chilling first, if that’s your intention, followed by 4-5 hours at room temp.  It will be obvious if the frosting will water out or lose it’s shape.  A small amount of watering out would be fine, it would be absorbed by the cake, but anything more than a few drops would indicate that you need to incorporate some gelatin or other stabilizer. 

Another approach might be to thicken the fruit puree (for a fresh taste) with gelatin and use that for filling between the layers, then use a stabilized whipped cream for frosting the outside (such as white ganache made with creme fraiche or the cream cheese-stabilized whipped cream in RHC).

Good luck!

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Posted: 08 April 2013 04:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thanks Julie! Is the white ganache still pretty whipped cream like in terms of texture? It sounds good in terms of stability, but I’m just wondering how dense it is.

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Posted: 08 April 2013 10:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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It’s been a long time since I made the white ganache, but I remember it being a lot like whipped cream- lighter than light whipped ganache- but with a pretty marked flavor from the white chocolate.  I’m not a big white chocolate fan, so for me it tasted too much like white chocolate.  I’d be very interested to hear how it tastes with creme fraiche!

When you whip creme fraiche, it doesn’t get as fluffy as whipped cream, so I would expect the white ganache made with creme fraiche to be a little denser in texture as compared to standard whipped cream.  But still a lot lighter than buttercream.  When I whip creme fraiche I add some heavy cream to it to lighten it up.

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Posted: 09 April 2013 12:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’m not a big fan of white chocolate either. I think maybe the Jam Cream would be better for me. I’m also curious to try Hector’s method for stabilizing whipped cream. I’m thinking of using the Jam Cream to frost the cake. The filling will probably be a layer of Strawberry Conserve and perhaps some sliced, macerated, and drained strawberries if I can get some decent ones at the market this week. I already started on the creme fraiche. Last night, I scalded the cream (great tip!) and threw in a used vanilla pod during the scalding process—might as well get some extra flavor out of this step! Then I innoculated the mixture with some buttermilk when everything was cooled to room temp. This morning I had vanilla creme fraiche!

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Posted: 09 April 2013 11:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Your vanilla creme fraiche sounds wonderful, makes me want to do the same, right this minute!  smile

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