Pound Cake issue…
Posted: 08 April 2013 02:34 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi all,

I am new to baking, and I have always wanting to bake my own pound cakes.

So, I googled pound cake recipes on the Internet.

I picked a pound cake recipe on: tasteofhome (Coconut Loaf Recipe)

Here is the original ingredients
  1/2 cup butter, softened
  1 cup sugar
  2 eggs
  1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  2 cups all-purpose flour
  2 teaspoons baking powder
  1/2 teaspoon salt
  3/4 cup 2% milk
  1-1/4 cups flaked coconut

I tried this recipe 2 times.

First time, it was on last Sunday:
I didn’t use flaked coconut, so I left it out.
But I kept the rest same.
I baked it for 1 hour and under 350F, then, the pound cake came out dry,hard,and no taste to it at all.

So, (2nd time)
I just tried it again, with little bit of modifications to the original recipe.

  1/2 cup butter, softened —->    salted butter   1min in the microwave.
  1 cup sugar             —->  1.2cup+2.5tea spoon
  2 eggs
  1 teaspoon vanilla extract —->  2 teasppon vanilla extract
  2 cups all-purpose flour   —->  1.5 cups
  2 teaspoons baking powder
  1/2 teaspoon salt     —->    0
  3/4 cup 2% milk       —->  1 cup
  1-1/4 cups flaked coconut —->  0

I baked it for 35minutes, under 350F.

So, the pound cake came out super dark, somewhat moist, and very greasy

:(

What did I do wrong?

Please help..


p.s
Both times, I added 2 teaspoons of Moist cake mix..

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Posted: 08 April 2013 02:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Thanks for providing a lot of information; most people don’t.

Sounds like your oven might be too hot. Have you checked it with a thermometer? And 1 minute for the butter in the microwave is a long, long time. It would be a melted puddle in mine. Even if it isn’t, if it’s too soft, it won’t hold much air when you cream it, producing a dense product.

The lack of moisture from overbaking would result in a lack of flavor, so you may only have one problem.

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Posted: 08 April 2013 10:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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A few thoughts:

First, this is a layer cake recipe, not a pound cake.  A pound cake has something close to equal weights of butter, eggs, flour and sugar.  They may specify a loaf pan, but the formula is a layer cake formula.  As such, I would expect it to be lighter and sweeter than a pound cake.

The darker color of the second attempt as compared to the first would be from your increase in sugar.

The greasy texture of the second attempt could be a combination of your reduction in flour and the melting of the butter (assuming that 1 min in the microwave melted it).

I agree with Charles that the cake sounds like it is overbaked, either the oven could be too hot or the baking time too long.  If you have an instant read thermometer, the cake should only be baked to an internal temp of 190F-200F. 

I would suggest a different recipe, one that you don’t need to leave out any ingredients.  The flaked coconut may be integral to the flavor and texture of this cake.

Your flour should be bleached AP, greasiness can also come from using unbleached flour.

Perhaps most importantly, you may be measuring flour in a way that gives you too much.  A cake with too much flour will be dry, bland and tasteless.  If you are dipping the measuring cup into a bag or bin of flour, you are measuring it in a way that gives a lot more flour than if you spoon it into the cup or sift it into the cup.  If the recipe doesn’t specify how to measure, it may take a few test runs to figure out the right way to do it.  From looking at the recipe, I’m guessing that this is either lightly spooned into the cup or sifted into the cup.

Good luck!

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Posted: 10 April 2013 01:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hi CharlesT, and Julie,

Yes,,, I completed melted the butter…  ;(

I guess I shouldn’t have melted it?


Do you have any recommendations for the pound cake recipe?

I’m trying to make the same pound cake that they sell at Costco..

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Posted: 10 April 2013 01:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Learning to Bake - 10 April 2013 04:18 AM

Yes,,, I completed melted the butter?  ;( I guess I shouldn?t have melted it?

Not in this recipe. Most cakes call for “creaming” the butter, and the butter has to be “soft”, not melted or right out of the fridge. The instructions for this recipe say “cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy.” You weren’t able to do that, so your batter didn’t hold nearly as much air as it should have, producing a dense product. It probably also made it greasy. The butter should be between 60 and 65 degrees….if you have a thermometer, that’s the best way to know.

Rose has a very excellent pound cake in the Cake Bible. Cooks Illustrated also has a good one:

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/recipes/detail.asp?docid=8027

You gotta get that creaming nailed, though, because their recipe has no baking powder.

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Posted: 28 April 2013 01:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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CharlesT - 10 April 2013 04:29 AM
Learning to Bake - 10 April 2013 04:18 AM

Yes,,, I completed melted the butter?  ;( I guess I shouldn?t have melted it?

Not in this recipe. Most cakes call for “creaming” the butter, and the butter has to be “soft”, not melted or right out of the fridge. The instructions for this recipe say “cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy.” You weren’t able to do that, so your batter didn’t hold nearly as much air as it should have, producing a dense product. It probably also made it greasy. The butter should be between 60 and 65 degrees….if you have a thermometer, that’s the best way to know.

Rose has a very excellent pound cake in the Cake Bible. Cooks Illustrated also has a good one:

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/recipes/detail.asp?docid=8027

You gotta get that creaming nailed, though, because their recipe has no baking powder.

Hi, do you have the link for Rose’ pound cake recip?

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Posted: 28 April 2013 03:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Learning to Bake - 28 April 2013 04:48 PM

Hi, do you have the link for Rose’ pound cake recip?

No, sorry. You’ll find it in “The Cake Bible”.

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Posted: 30 April 2013 06:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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If I remember right, the pound cake recipe in TCB calls for a bunt style pan.  What kind of adjustments would one need to make to it in order to bake a double layer, 9” cake?

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Posted: 30 April 2013 06:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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fourarchangels - 30 April 2013 09:15 PM

If I remember right, the pound cake recipe in TCB calls for a bunt style pan.  What kind of adjustments would one need to make to it in order to bake a double layer, 9” cake?

It may not have enough structure to support itself over such a wide expanse (9”), which is why these cakes are generally baked in loaf or bundt pans. Maybe someone here has tried that and can tell you if it worked.

If it doesn’t work, you might consider using AP flour, rather than cake flour. Also, I vaguely recall Rose having a variation on the recipe that she says to use in larger pans, but I don’t know if larger means wider; she may be referring to a bundt pan.

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