Buttercream dilemma
Posted: 17 April 2013 11:33 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I have the privilege of making my inlaws 50th wedding anniversary cake next week.  They are the most amazing people and I am blessed to have them as my second set of parents. I have decided to go with the golden dream wedding cake ( 6 and 9 inch layers )  I have never made this cake before, but I have read so so many wonderful reviews that I just have to try it. ( besides, butter, lemon, and almonds are a match made in heaven )

I am trying to decide what buttercream to use.  I love the white chocolate mousseline buttercream.  It tastes wonderful and I have never had any problems making it, or decorating with it.  On the other hand,  the buttercream used for the golden dream wedding cakes sounds heavenly.  I have read some postings and it sounds like it might be a bit fussy.  I don’t know if I should take a chance and make it or stay with something I am more comfortable with.

I will not be piping any decorations on the cake ( those will be made out of gumpaste )  So basically I am only icing the cake smooth. 

I am thinking of making a lemon pastry cream for the filling.

Any tips/tricks when making this buttercream would be so helpful!!!

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Posted: 18 April 2013 02:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi Liza,

I haven’t made the golden dream, but the buttercream that goes with it is the one with white chocolate, lemon, some egg yolk, and butter, correct?  IF so, you must try the buttercream that goes with the cake.  It is exceptional—I don’t recall it being too fussy and it piped wonderfully.  Maybe try one batch just to get a feel for it (and so you don’t waste a huge amount of ingredients).  Also, most buttercream issues amount to an emulsion problem—if temperature doesn’t work, try an immersion blender.  I’ve had success using an immersion blender to emulsify separated white chocolate mixtures. 

Good Luck!  Can’t wait to see your end result and congratulations to your inlaws on their 50th!

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Posted: 18 April 2013 09:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Ooooo, I just love the golden dream cake- cake, syrup, frosting, it is one of my all-time favorites!  You are so sweet to be making this for them.  For me, the frosting surpasses lemon curd mousseline as my favorite lemon frosting.

I think the frosting may be easier than mousseline.  I can offer a tip or two. (imagine that, me offering advice…) 

-The work at the double boiler requires you to switch gears.  At first you keep the heat quite low and mild when melting the white chocolate in order to avoid scorching- white chocolate is easy to scorch.  Then, once you’ve added the eggs, it’s helpful to turn the heat up a bit because if you don’t it can be a struggle to get the custard mixture hot enough to thicken.

-You have to make the recipe twice (two batches) to come up with the yield listed- I missed that detail first time around.

-Green & Black’s white chocolate is highly recommended, so yummy.

-This will freeze and re-beat like any of the hot sugar syrup frostings.

Looking forward to seeing your cake!

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Posted: 18 April 2013 01:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Liza, I agree with Sherrie and Julie in their recommendation to make the white chocolate vanilla bean buttercream that’s paired with the cake. I made it for my mother’s birthday a while ago and it’s probably one of the best received cakes I’ve ever served. The almond-lemon-vanilla-white chocolate flavours of the cake with that buttercream marry beautifully so that it’s not too nutty or too fruity and ends up appealing to many different tastes .....even white chocolate haters loved it!

The buttercream isn’t difficult to make - just follow Julie’s excellent advice…it’s what got me through the first time - and it does pipe very well (it’s the one in my avatar). It is slightly more translucent and a little softer than mousseline but still easy to work with.

I think your in-laws will love it. I hope you post photos.

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Posted: 18 April 2013 11:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I love, love, love just totally love the Golden Dream.  I do not remember, but I do not think I did white chocolate (do not like it).  I am certain I just did vanilla bean mousselline and another time perhaps silk meringue.  I am sure the one Rose has paired in the book is delicious.  I just love this cake (oh I said that already).

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Posted: 22 April 2013 12:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Thanks everyone for your advice.  So sorry I took so long to reply back.  Well, the cakes are baked and sitting at room temp. until tomorrow moring and I took the plunge and made the white chocolate vanilla bean buttercream.  Just waiting for the custard to cool in the fridge.  Can’t wait to see the results.

I used lindt white couverture chocolate so I won’t have any vanilla seed specks in the buttercream, which is fine with me.

Do you think that one batch of this icing will yeild enough to frost a nine and six inch cake?  Each cake will be split so that I will have 4 nine inch layers and 4 six inch layers.  Also I will not be using the buttercream as a filling, I will be filling the cakes with lemon pastry cream.

Thanks so much Julie for your tips.  They really helped when I was making the custard.

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Posted: 22 April 2013 10:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Liza - 22 April 2013 03:24 PM

Do you think that one batch of this icing will yeild enough to frost a nine and six inch cake?

According to Rose’s Master Chart of Frosting Quantities in TCB, you would need 3 cups for the outside of those cakes plus another cup or two for piping.  However, that doesn’t include anything for filling in discrepancies of shape or crumb coating, and I omitted the amount for filling in between the layers since you’re using pastry cream (yum!).  In general, I use a little more frosting and filling than that chart specifies.  So if you made the 7-cup batch, it seems like you should be good to go! 

If you have any buttercream left over, I like to freeze it until blueberries come in season, then use it as a piped border on a golden dream torte topped with hot glazed blueberries.  It’s another wonderful, dreamy cake, a favorite.

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Posted: 22 April 2013 11:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Thank-you Julie.  Yes,  I am only doing a smooth layer on each cake, no piping either.  I was really surprised how spongy the buttercream got after it sat at room temperature.  The mousseline and neoclassic have never acted like that.  It almost had a mousselike consistency and it was a little softer than the mousseline, but not too soft. Definitely pipeable.  I really like the taste,  It reminds me of vanilla pudding. ( I omitted the lemon in the buttercream because there is lemon in the cake ( actually I substituted the lemon oil for the lemon zest and accidently added 1 tablespoon instead of 1 teaspoon ), and I am adapting Roses orange pastry cream to make lemon pastry cream as the filling.  I am sure with the extra lemon oil it will taste nice and lemony. 

I will definitely freeze any buttercream leftovers.

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Posted: 23 April 2013 08:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Can’t wait to see it!  smile

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