Chocolate Honey Cake
Posted: 20 April 2013 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Can anyone please help with conversion of American cup measurements to grams. I made the following recipe with conversion rates I sourced on the internet (of which there were many variations). Most were ok but the one I found quite strange was the honey. One website said that 1 cup of honey weighs 340g which seemed way too much. I used about 300g, but the cake rose well, it sank immediately after removing from the oven and the edges were quite hard (probably because of too much honey?). I love using honey in my chocolate recipes and would love to make a succesful cake. Any comments please on this recipe with relevant conversions. I find it so much more accurate using metric measurements.

1? c Dutch cocoa powder
1-1/2 c hot brewed coffee
1 c mild honey, such as clover
3 c unbleached all purpose flour
1-1/2 tsp baking powder
1-1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
3/4 c unsalted butter, softened
3/4 c vegetable oil
1 c packed dark brown sugar
1 c granulated sugar
4 large eggs
3/4 c sour cream
2 tsp vanilla extract

I won’t post the method unless someone would like it. I made RLB’s dark chocolate ganache and added a little honey and it was delicious.

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Posted: 20 April 2013 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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In Rose’s, “The Pie And Pastry Bible”,  the “basic pastry ingredients weights and measures” chart reads:

honey 12 ounces/ 345 grams per cup

I always rely on Rose’s measurements when converting recipes from other books.

Good luck.

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Posted: 20 April 2013 01:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Trish - 20 April 2013 02:49 PM

One website said that 1 cup of honey weighs 340g which seemed way too much.

Just weigh a cup of honey and you’ve got a definitive answer.


Your results could be due to a number of factors: oven too hot, too much leavening, insufficient mixing, too much liquid or too little flour.

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Posted: 21 April 2013 06:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thanks for your comments. I live in the UK so haven’t any American cups, so have to rely on measurements in grams. Yes Rose does say 340g for a cup but it does just seem a large quantity.
Can anyone else recommend a good chocolate honey cake.

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Posted: 21 April 2013 01:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Trish, honey is dense. Milk is 242g so it isn’t improbable for honey to weigh 340g. Rose is very accurate and very reliable. I think most of us here will attest to that fact.

I could not find a chocolate honey cake recipe for you. For comparison purposes, I found a honey cake recipe which uses gram weights. This recipe calls for 1 cup of honey and the gram weight is 340g

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/honey-cake-recipe

King Arthur Flour might be a good site for you to check-out. Most of their recipes allow you to view the recipe in cups, ounces or gram weights.

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Posted: 21 April 2013 01:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Trish - 21 April 2013 09:54 AM

Thanks for your comments. I live in the UK so haven’t any American cups, so have to rely on measurements in grams. Yes Rose does say 340g for a cup but it does just seem a large quantity.
Can anyone else recommend a good chocolate honey cake.

A US cup is 237 ml.

If you like the flavor of this recipe, it might be easier to just fix it than find another. Does your flour weigh around 360 g? If so, then you might reduce the quantity of coffee and see if that helps, and then try eliminating the baking POWDER.

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