Ice cream sandwich cake
Posted: 26 April 2013 08:36 AM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2011-06-02

Hey everybody!
I just finished making the ice cream sandwich cake. I used unbleached AP [10% protein] and slightly more baking powder, and it tastes absolutely fine, though I don’t know what a bleached-flour one tastes like.
Anyway, I was wondering how to make the cake [just] slightly more firm and dense.
Would adding melted dark chocolate mess with the proportions too much? Because it is heavy, I’m guessing it could result in a slightly lower cake, but I’m OK with that.
Also, if it’s a good idea- when should I add the chocolate? After the egg whites?

Thanks- any help would be appreciated!

 Signature 

McBrownie.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 April 2013 12:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  905
Joined  2009-05-25

Possibly subbing some of the oil with butter would work.  The chocolate may work as well, but I think I would add it to the cocoa/hot water mixture.  I’d be careful though, as the cocoa solids may cause the cake to seem dry—I’m not sure how that would affect the overall texture/balance of the cake.  I assume you made it as a frozen cake (or just the cake base?) but have you tried eating it refrigerated or with the milk chocolate syrup?  Both of these options make the cake denser and the syrup makes it richer.  Of course, if your intention is to use the cake for the ice cream cake, then obviously the syrup may not be desirable as it would mar the appearance of the cake (unless you go the route of putting some glaze on it).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 April 2013 08:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4791
Joined  2008-04-16

You could try reducing the baking powder (but not the baking soda) to create a denser cake.  This should make it both shorter and less tender.  This strikes me as the easier and less risky option.

Or you could try the melted chocolate, start small- perhaps an ounce- in order to avoid making the cake fall.  I would chop it and bloom it along with the cocoa, you may need a little more boiling water to do that.  The extra structure (cacao mass) and fat/sugar in chocolate should balance each other somewhat, though the high saturation of the cocoa butter (compared to the oil in the cake) will make it more fine crumbed and dense/short.  It will also make the cake more firm/hard when cold or frozen.

I’m not sure what the pH of chocolate will do to the batter, but I’m speculating that it will be OK as long as you don’t use a chocolate with dairy in it.

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  How to Make Sourdough More (or Less) Sour

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 April 2013 03:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2011-06-02

Thank you both!

I thought about adding it to the cocoa mixture, but because I’m whipping it alot later, I thought maybe it could change the way it behaves. I used it as the Ice cream cake, hence it was eaten frozen. I have not tried it refrigerated- does it matter if it’s frozen or refrigerated? If anything, freezing in theory should make it denser than refrigerating, doesn’t it?
I didn’t use the ganache syrup, as it is used as an ice cream cake!

Reducing the baking powder is a good idea, but because I’m using unbleached AP and it already has a bit of a dome, decreasing it would make it worse.

So I guess adding melted chocolate is my best bet so far- starting with an ounce is a good idea, I didn’t think about it.

Thanks!
I will post the results when I make it again.

 Signature 

McBrownie.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 April 2013 12:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  905
Joined  2009-05-25

Hi McBrownie,
I just wanted to know if you had just made the cake part (and eaten as is) or if you had made the ice cream cake ... in which case it was already cold.  The cake will obviously be firmer if it is chilled/frozen.  Good luck with your tests.  I’ll be interested in knowing how it turns out.  Another thought came to mind, you may want to consider the Miette Tomboy— it is an oil based cake and it’s denser than the cake you’ve made.  I like it and I think it could hold it’s own with ice cream—but it may end up being too dense.  Perhaps something to consider if your experiment doesn’t produce the result you were hoping for.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 April 2013 02:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2011-06-02
Sherrie - 28 April 2013 03:29 AM

Hi McBrownie,
I just wanted to know if you had just made the cake part (and eaten as is) or if you had made the ice cream cake ... in which case it was already cold.  The cake will obviously be firmer if it is chilled/frozen.  Good luck with your tests.  I’ll be interested in knowing how it turns out.  Another thought came to mind, you may want to consider the Miette Tomboy— it is an oil based cake and it’s denser than the cake you’ve made.  I like it and I think it could hold it’s own with ice cream—but it may end up being too dense.  Perhaps something to consider if your experiment doesn’t produce the result you were hoping for.

Oh, then yes- It was eaten cold [frozen]. The weirdest [and coolest!] thing is that the cake itself doesn’t GET cold; the ice cream is colder than the cake. I had thought they will both be cold, but the cake itself just won’t set rock-hard. The Miette cake is a great idea I love the taste and texture of it! but, is it possible to eat it frozen? I wouldn’t mind if it would become denser, like a brownie, I just don’t want it to become un-sliceable and un-biteable. I did plan to make it soon, so I’ll try that idea by eating a slice of it after freezing.
Thanks!

 Signature 

McBrownie.

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top