Measuring Liquid Ingredients
Posted: 12 August 2008 11:38 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I have a question about measuring liquid ingredients. I just purchased a scale that weighs both dry & liquid ingredients. I was reading that a cup of water has a different weight using a scale for dry ingredients than it does using a scale that measures liquids. In Rose’s books are the weights given meant to be used with oz or liquid oz or does it make a difference?

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Posted: 12 August 2008 11:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi Sparkie - Rose gives all ingredients listed volume measurements, as well as weight in both pounds/ounces and kilograms/grams.

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Posted: 13 August 2008 11:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I use grams, they are more accurate than ounces. 

Someone at a chef supply store tried to explain the liquid/dry wieght thing to me, but I just kept thinking, “how can an ounce weigh something other than an ounce?”.  I think it has to do with a cup of water having a different volume than a one cup dry measure.  Perhaps the scale is translating volume into weight?

Anyway, Rose’s recipes always give grams, which is what I use.

Julie

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Posted: 13 August 2008 12:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think, actually, the difference is in the volume.  One cup of liquid measured in a cup made for liquid measure (with a spout)  will have a different weight than one cup of liquid measured in a cup made for dry measure (without a spout).  Weight is weight. Hope that helps.

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Posted: 13 August 2008 12:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I always find this confusing, but I believe fluid ounces are a unit of volume, not weight.  So I’m not really sure how there would be a fluid ounces scale, but it would be true that a recipe written for fluid ounces would have to be converted if you wanted to measure by weight (ounces).  Rose’s recipes are written for weight ounces.

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Posted: 13 August 2008 12:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Looks like we answered together Bill!

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Posted: 13 August 2008 12:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Yep…we answered together…fluid ounces are not on a scale…only in a cup.  Different liquids weigh different amounts…so a fluid ounce of water has a different weight than a fluid ounce of oil…etc.

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Posted: 13 August 2008 01:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Julie - 13 August 2008 02:02 PM

I use grams, they are more accurate than ounces. 

Someone at a chef supply store tried to explain the liquid/dry wieght thing to me, but I just kept thinking, “how can an ounce weigh something other than an ounce?”.  I think it has to do with a cup of water having a different volume than a one cup dry measure.  Perhaps the scale is translating volume into weight?

Anyway, Rose’s recipes always give grams, which is what I use.

Julie

it’s confusing because they have the same name. as bill said, weight is weight. but one cup in a dry measure is very close to one cup in a liquid measure even though one oz in weight and one oz volume can be completely different!

so you sort of have to decide which method you are going to use. it’s like the old joke “which weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of lead?” even though they do weigh the same, the feathers are likely to take up much more space.

as Patricia pointed out rose’s recipes provide both weight and volume so that you don’t have to have a scale, but she says she finds weight a more precise way to measure ingredients.

just a tip: cover your scale with saran wrap to make cleaning easier!

jen

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Posted: 13 August 2008 01:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Just to add a bit more confusion to the mix - liquid and dry measures actually measure the same volume - the liquid measuring cups have a pour spout, and taller sides to prevent spilling, but I liquid cup of fluid will fill 1 dry cup exactly (if accurate that is).  Even more reason to weigh everything!

smile

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Posted: 13 August 2008 03:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Patrincia - 13 August 2008 04:13 PM

Just to add a bit more confusion to the mix -

An more confusion…........isn’t a US “cup” different to a “cup” in the UK and Australia? I guess weighing is definitely the way to go. As Bill said weight is weight.

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Posted: 13 August 2008 04:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Weight is weight, until we start baking cakes on the moon that is smile

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Posted: 13 August 2008 05:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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more to the fun:

a cup of liquid weights differently depending on the type of liquid.  A cup of milk weight more than a cup of plain water, for example.

a cup of flour weights differently depending, too.  A cup of whole weight flour weights more than a cup of bleached AP, for example.

If you have a scale, I hope it is electronic and accurate.  They are priced under $50 now, for both been electronic and accurate.  Sure thing, you can have a $300 electronic and accurate scale like mine’s but just paying for the looks basically =)

Therefore:  scale, electronic, and accurate, I suggest you measure EVERYTHING by weight, and in grams.  EXCEPT, minute volumes like vanilla, salt, and creme or tartar, I rather do by volume (spoon measures), but when I bake large batches, I measure by volume and then weight it, too.

You would need a laboratory scale, for thousands of $, to measure minute volumes by weight!  Rose has one!

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Posted: 13 August 2008 05:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Long live weighing by gram!

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Posted: 13 August 2008 09:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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You said it, Patrincia! All my cookbooks now have weights scribbled in the margins—and the pages in Rose’s books where she gives her standard weights for 1 cup of various things have a special permanent tab so I can find them quickly!

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Posted: 13 August 2008 11:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Barbara - 14 August 2008 12:01 AM

You said it, Patrincia! All my cookbooks now have weights scribbled in the margins—and the pages in Rose’s books where she gives her standard weights for 1 cup of various things have a special permanent tab so I can find them quickly!


I do the same thing. Makes life so much easier.

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Posted: 14 August 2008 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Thanks for all of the wonderful info - I’ll be sure to weigh everything in grams from now on.  I just bought an Escali #A115B Aqua Liquid Measuring Scale to replace my old scale & now I’m wondering if I should return it & get a KD7000.  The reason I got the Escali was because I thought it would be more “accurate” weighing liquids.  But now that doesn’t seem to matter.  I read a lot about the KD7000 & I’m just hesitant to buy that because it’s not waterproof & the buttons have spaces that need protection from the clear cover.  America’s Test Kitchen recommends the Oxo but I don’t like the fractions.  They also recommend the Salter Aquatronic Glass Kitchen Scale but say the display isn’t large enough & the Soehnle 65055 Digital Scale (their old favorite).  Any suggestions?

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