Lemon curd and kumquat cheesecake
Posted: 06 May 2013 05:57 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I made this cake for Cinco de Mayo celebration with coworkers and everyone was very impressed! I must say that looking at it makes me very happy—reminds me of the bright flowers of spring.

Candied kumquat and orange blossom water cheesecake; biscuit de Savoie base (soaked with 1/4 c. Frangelico and of course more liquid from the cheesecake), lemon curd topping; candied kumquat, candied lemon, and candied clementine roses garnish. Lavender stems from the garden.

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Posted: 06 May 2013 08:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I’m not surprised that your co-workers were impressed, that is one beautiful cheesecake! The top decoration is so pretty and the flavour sounds delicious - fresh and citrusy.

I like the idea of a biscuit de savoie base but have never tried that. Do you need to syrup it or would the cheesecake filling make and keep it moist?

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Posted: 06 May 2013 08:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It is spectacular!  I love kumquats and I bet they are fabulous in cheesecake.  Gorgeous presentation, makes me excited about the return to warmer weather smile

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Posted: 06 May 2013 05:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hi Sophia! I think the cheesecake filling alone should provide enough moisture to the biscuit. Plus, for some reason, my springform pan always gets a bit of water inside even after double wrapping with foil. Maybe it’s just condensation inside the foil. This is why I like using a sponge cake as the cheesecake base—to soak up extra moisture. (And I hate graham cracker crusts.) Plus, cheesecake isn’t actually a cake until you put a cake on the bottom! smile For the biscuit, I actually syruped it with a 1/4 c. Frangelico and then put it in the springform pan with the cheesecake batter and perhaps the cake was a little too wet this time. I only did this because I really wanted a hazelnut flavor in the cake, but in the end, the Frangelico was still very faint. I think the extra moisture probably pushed out some of the Frangelico.

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Posted: 06 May 2013 08:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I echo Julie, beautiful presentation!!  The roses, the kumquat flowers and the candied lemons each look so perfect.  Lavender sticks - so creative!!  I will have to try that biscuit thing sometime.  A cheesecake is not a cake until you put a cake on the bottom—right-oh.

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Posted: 07 May 2013 08:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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michaelnrdx - 06 May 2013 08:06 PM

I think the cheesecake filling alone should provide enough moisture to the biscuit. Plus, for some reason, my springform pan always gets a bit of water inside even after double wrapping with foil. Maybe it’s just condensation inside the foil. This is why I like using a sponge cake as the cheesecake base—to soak up extra moisture.

I prefer my cheesecakes crustless but this sounds like a good alternative…I think I’ll try it though I know my next cheesecake will not approach yours in beauty smile

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Posted: 13 May 2013 10:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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That looks awesome!  Unique favors and what a fantastic presentation.  In my little circle of friends, I’m known for making cheesecakes so my radar is always up for something unique, such as this one.  I have a couple of questions if you don’t mind.

Is the lemon curd home made?  I recently saw a recipe for some but failed to mark the website. :(

Can you elaborate on what your bisquet de Savoie includes?  I’ve never heard that term before and will look it up, but I’m interested in what you used.

Thanks,

Ed

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Posted: 14 May 2013 10:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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This is one BEAUTIFUL cheesecake! Yummy!

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Posted: 15 May 2013 02:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Hi Ed! If you try my cheesecake, let me know how it goes! Everything was homemade here—the cake base, the cheesecake, the lemon curd, the candied kumquats, lemons, and clementine peel roses. A biscuit de Savoie is a type of sponge cake. It has no butter in the batter, so it’s very dry unless syruped. The texture is spongier than a genoise, and the biscuit de Savoie can take more syrup without becoming too soggy. It was a good choice for the cheesecake, because I soaked the cake with a bit of Frangelico before using it as the base. There was definitely a lot of liquid. It almost got soggy, and if I had used a genoise, it probably would’ve been too soggy. However, a genoise works fine as a base as long as you are not adding extra liquids.

All the recipes are from Rose’s The Cake Bible. The candied kumquat recipe is on one of Rose’s blog posts, and the candied lemon slices were from The Pie and Pastry Bible (used in one of the lemon tartlets). The lemon curd recipe is in The Cake Bible and The Pie and Pastry Bible.

The lemon curd must be freshly made, because it has to still be liquid enough to pour over the cheesecake. After pouring and chilling, the lemon curd will set into a smooth layer on the top. Do the pouring while the cheesecake is still in the pan. That way, the curd won’t run over onto the sides, which would look kind of messy.

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