Toasting Freshly-Baked Bread Slices
Posted: 06 May 2013 11:07 PM   [ Ignore ]
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The crust will be torched before the crumb is browned. Stands to reason: the crust is very dry and starts to brown well before the moist crumb. The moisture will probably even out within a few hours. Just thought you’d like to know.

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Posted: 07 May 2013 01:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hmmm, interesting.  When you toast fresh bread, the crust burns more quickly while the interior is slow to brown, is that right?  Makes sense.  Good to know smile

Why were you toasting fresh bread? Making anything interesting?

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Posted: 07 May 2013 04:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Julie - 07 May 2013 04:58 PM

Making anything interesting?

Nope, sorry, I never make anything interesting. I’m still working on the basics; I clearly cannot even toast bread. grin But I did make my interpretation of the FWSY Poolish white bread. Nothing revolutionary about the formula, of course, although the Poolish percentage is higher than most at 50% of the flour. But to simulate the cast iron pot, after removing the steam cover from by bread, I turned the oven to pure convection and cranked the heat up to 510. Ten minutes later, it was deeply brown, pretty close to the photos in the book.

I think my grigne are so dark because my shiny, stainless steel cover doesn’t irradiate the surface of the bread like the hot oven walls would do or the hot cast iron dutch oven. I may paint the thing black to help it get up to temperature more quickly.

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Posted: 07 May 2013 09:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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You may be on to something- I had thought I remembered my breads turning out like that when they were covered with a light silver aluminum cover instead of the cast iron DO. 

Or maybe it was when they weren’t proofed in a banneton, so the crust didn’t dry out as much as it does in floured linen or a porous basket.  The drier crust is easier to score and, like your toast, probably browned better than the moist crumb/slashed portion.

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Posted: 08 May 2013 02:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Julie - 08 May 2013 12:00 AM

Or maybe it was when they weren’t proofed in a banneton, so the crust didn’t dry out as much as it does in floured linen or a porous basket.  The drier crust is easier to score and, like your toast, probably browned better than the moist crumb/slashed portion.

Hmmm, mine are proofed in a plastic banneton, so there’s probably not much drying going on. So your theory is that a drier skin can produce a greater contrast between the crust and the cuts? Seems like this effect would be neutralized by the steam, but maybe that effect is only on the very thinnest layer on the outside. I asked the question on the blog of the guy who described the steaming technique I use, so I’ll see if he has any thoughts.

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Posted: 08 May 2013 02:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Interested to hear what he says.  If I ever find time, I would love to bake up a number of test loaves smile

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