Adjusting white velvet cake recipe for 12x18” cake
Posted: 25 May 2013 11:47 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I’d like to bake your white velvet cake in a 12x18 pan - what adjustments should I make to the recipe?  Thank you for your help. 

Paperdiva

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Posted: 25 May 2013 01:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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paperdiva - 25 May 2013 02:47 PM

I’d like to bake your white velvet cake in a 12x18 pan - what adjustments should I make to the recipe?  Thank you for your help. 

PAPERDIIVE:

Good afternoon. Paperdive, If you are referring to the recipe on page 46, of the CAKE BIBLE, it is a 41.625, oz recipe (41,5/8ths)

  The 12X18X2, inch pan holds an average of 26, cups of batter depending on the actual pan size…. some are 1/4 of an inch smaller so forth & so on. that is 216, oz. we must allow for the chemical leaveners which I divide by 3 X2 & that equates to 144, oz.

This recipe is for 41.625, oz so you must increase this recipe by 3.5 times.

  One more thing the chemical leaveners need adjustment because not only because of the recipe increase in ratio & proportion but due to the configuration of the pan itself It is lower as well. I best leave that to Member JULIE to help you there as I do not know much on that score.

  If you plan to this I hope you can increase the recipe accurately…If you cannot I will do it for you.
  Good luck & enjoy the rest of the weekend.

  ~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 25 May 2013 07:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Dear FRESHKID,
Thank you very much for responding to my query.  The info was very helpful!  However, I will have to wait for JULIE’S help with the leavening Q.  Until last evenings perusing of real baking I did not know that a adjustment in pan size means an adjustment in leavening.  Do I need to contact JULIE or will she see my post and respond? Thanks again for the quick response.

Paperdiva

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Posted: 26 May 2013 09:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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paperdiva, do you have the Cake Bible?  If so, consider multiplying the base recipe on p.491 by 7 or 8 for your batter (either will work, it just depends on how high you would like the layer).  Then for the leavening, multiply 1.25 teaspoons by the same factor, 7 or 8.  I got this from the table on the following page. 

If you are looking at the chart on p.490, please be aware that there is a correction- the baking times for the two sheet cakes should be reversed, i.e., the longer time is for the larger cake.

The thing about leavening and butter cakes is that the batters need to be stronger to span a longer distance between pan sides (kind of like a bridge needs to be stronger to span a longer distance between shores).  An easy way to strengthen butter cake batter is to reduce the leavening.

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Posted: 27 May 2013 12:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Julie, thank you for your response.  I do not have my copy yet so I’ll wait for it and make the adjustments you suggest.
Thanks!
Jennifer

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Posted: 28 May 2013 08:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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The Cake Bible is often available through libraries smile

If you tell me which version of the recipe you’re using (i.e., RHC? ), I can try to help adjust the baking powder, etc., I’m just not sure how large your recipe is.

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Posted: 30 May 2013 01:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Thanks Julie,
I did go to the library and checked out their copy. I can’t wait to receive my own.  What a treasure trove of info.  I want to read it cover to back.  So I will use the 1.25 conversion for baking powder as your suggest.
Thanks again!

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Posted: 30 May 2013 06:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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You’re welcome! 

Good luck!

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Posted: 03 June 2013 02:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Is there a more systematic way to compute the rose factor, leavening agent, etc.? I am finding it a bit too daunting to convert my basic recipes to larger ones because of fear of a flop. I do not like wasting ingredients in case it does not turn out right. What I have been doing is referencing to TCB’s tiered cake recipes for larger cakes. It will really be nice if there is a video tutorial available that can simplify this for me. I learn better if shown than reading through the information on my own.

Thank you.

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Posted: 04 June 2013 01:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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The most systematic system I know of is the “Rose Factor” system in the wedding cake section of The Cake Bible.  Everything is well-tested and precise.

For cakes other than those included in Rose’s wedding cakes sections, I don’t know of any foolproof way to calculate leavening.  According to Rose, theory will only take you so far, it is really a jumping off point for testing.  Over on Rose’s blog, there are some posts from Hector, who has tested formulas for larger cakes and generously published his results, you might take a look at that.

All that said, most reports here on the forums suggest that small, logical adjustments to leavening generally seem to work out well.

Good luck!

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