karmel cake - scaling up and making the caramel
Posted: 04 June 2013 11:11 AM   [ Ignore ]
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So i wanted to bake the karmel cake in a 10 inch pan.. planning on baking a two layer 10 inch cake ... i ve had trouble with this cke before.. but not in terms of size but in terms of the making of the caamel itself. mine kept splitting and i ended up blitzing it to make it a homogenous mixture… 
anyhooe someone anyone please help =) how should i scale this cake up to get a 10 inch pan worth?  and hints from people who ve had success with this cake wpuld be really helpful to me right now =)

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Posted: 04 June 2013 02:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I made this cake when I was testing possibilities for rum cake.  I followed directions to a T and I think there was a little curdling, but if I remember correctly the curds were small, it did not separate into large lumps and water or anything dramatic like that.  Frankly, I don’t see how the caramel can be made without some curdling as milk + acid will always curdle when heated- I expected it to curdle.  I don’t think you need to blitz it or anything, just cool it and push on with the recipe, curdles and all.  Do be careful that you are using light brown sugar and not dark brown (which is more acidic), and that you are using ultra-pasteurized milk with plenty of time left on its use by date.  Also be very careful of temperatures, don’t go hotter and turn down the heat as you approach the target temp.

Regarding baking it in a larger pan, have you tried this in a 10” round and found that it worked well without an adjustment to leavening?  If so, that would be good to know smile

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Posted: 04 June 2013 03:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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chocoholic - 04 June 2013 02:11 PM

So i wanted to bake the karmel cake in a 10 inch pan.. planning on baking a two layer 10 inch cake ... i ve had trouble with this cke before.. but not in terms of size but in terms of the making of the caamel itself. mine kept splitting and i ended up blitzing it to make it a homogenous mixture… 
anyhooe someone anyone please help =) how should i scale this cake up to get a 10 inch pan worth?  and hints from people who ve had success with this cake wpuld be really helpful to me right now =)

CHOCOHOLIC:
  Good afternoon. I am not certain I understand your question (the last FEW SENTENCES) So, I will answer you the way I think I understand it. You wish to increase the recipe from a 9,inch X 2, inch pan to a 10, inch X 2, inch pan.
If this your question then a 10, in is just 20% more in yield over a 9,in pan. Sooo, just increase all ingredients by 20% eggs ...just add 1, yolk. This will fit 50% of the 10,in pan just like the 9,in pan that will allow for the leaveners.

Also follow what Julie has mentioned about the leaveners they do not increase or decrease in ratio & proportion.
If you require further information post it.

  Good luck & enjoy the rest of the day.

  ~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 04 June 2013 03:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hey Julie , i think i ve posted on the curdling issue before.. it wasnt a small amount of negligible curdling it was literally curds and whey.. i tried sticking to light brown and using the freshest milk i could find. .. not sure if its been ultra pasteurized or not… i saw some pictures of the caramel others had made and theirs somwhow dint look as grainy as mine. so i kept cookign it and then blitzed it. i ended up getting somehting much thicker than the others though =/ 
i havent tried it in a 10 inch round.. i was hoping to try it in a 10 inch but was unsure as to how to scale it up ?

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Posted: 04 June 2013 03:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Hey freshkid , thanks so much.. im really bad with math so i wouldnt have figured that out =) So 20 percent more of everything except for leavening , am i right?

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Posted: 04 June 2013 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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chocoholic - 04 June 2013 06:50 PM

Hey freshkid , thanks so much.. im really bad with math so i wouldnt have figured that out =) So 20 percent more of everything except for leavening , am i right?

CHOCOHOLIC:
  YES THAT IS CORRECT.

  ~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 04 June 2013 04:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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thank you!! But just to know.. why not increase the leavening?  =)

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Posted: 04 June 2013 05:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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chocoholic - 04 June 2013 07:39 PM

thank you!! But just to know.. why not increase the leavening?  =)

CHOCOHOLIC:
  Good question ask Julie she knows more about this subject than I. I do not as a amatuer baker bake large cakes. She does so she probably can explain it to you.

  Enjoy the day my friend.

  ~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 05 June 2013 08:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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chocoholic, re: curdling, sounds like you are using the right sugar and milk, be sure to limit heat as well- bring the caramel up to the right temp, turning down the heat as you approach the target zone so as not to go over.  Then pull it off the heat immediately and cool quickly, perhaps even dip the pan into a bowl or basin of cold tap water to lower the heat.  I point this out because you mentioned that you kept cooking it- more than was required?  Or just to bring it to the right temp?

Don’t worry about what others’ pictures looked like- maybe they snapped them before the mixture came all the way up to temp, or resolution was low, etc.  I often make cakes using frozen dairy that has separated and they turn out just fine, cakes have enough emulsifiers in the formula to take cake of that.

That said, if your curdled lumps are huge- pea sized, for instance- then cool the mixture, and once it is cool blitz in blender if you like. 

If it helps, remember that curdling isn’t always bad and in most cases doesn’t signify that anything is wrong or unsafe to eat.  If you’re making ricotta, curdling is good; if you’re making custard, it isn’t.  It just means that the proteins have been denatured by the combination of acid and heat. 

re: sizing up your recipe, a butter cake needs a little more strength to hold itself up in a larger pan- just like a bridge needs more strength to span a wider river than a narrow one, a cake needs more strength to hold up between the side of the pan when they are farther apart.  One easy way to increase strength in a butter cake batter is to reduce leavening, so that is why FRESHKID said not to scale up the leavening.  Sounds perfectly reasonable to me smile

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