I’m not doing it right…...
Posted: 08 June 2013 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m trying to use a bread machine to make bread.  I just don’t have the time to do it the old school way.  However I am using a variation on the basic white recipe and it just isn’t working right.

1.5 c hot water
2 tsp yeast
2 tsp salt
2 tbsp sugar
(here’s where it changes)
2 c white flour
2 c wheat four
(recipe calls for 4 c white)

The problem I’m getting is that the bread doesn’t raise correctly.  I get a 2lb loaf of very dense bread.  It is an upright machine and I don’t know if that has any bearing on it, but I’m looking for some advice or anything I can try to get the bread to be lighter. I realize that I changed the recipe and there are things at play in the mix that I really don’t know about. 

Any advice is really appreciated.

Thanks.

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Posted: 08 June 2013 02:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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When you say “wheat flour”, I suppose you mean “Whole Wheat Flour”, since white flour is also wheat flour.

Adding whole wheat flour will typically make the bread denser, so that may be your problem. Ignoring that, you’ll need more water in the dough because it will end up drier with the whole wheat. Dry dough won’t rise as well. It also helps to add a little extra gluten to the dough; it’s normally labeled “Vital Wheat Gluten” at the store.

It’s also possible that your yeast isn’t fresh or that you’re not using the right type of yeast for the machine.

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Posted: 08 June 2013 03:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Ok.  I’ll try the water first.  I’ll see about the gluten next shopping trip.

The density started with the first loaf for the yeast. 

Thanks for the info.

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Posted: 08 June 2013 03:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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dzimmerman - 08 June 2013 06:29 PM

The density started with the first loaf for the yeast.

If you mean that when you started using a new jar of yeast, the bread got denser, then you probably have some bad yeast.

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Posted: 10 June 2013 08:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I second Charles, substituting whole grain to a recipe often requires more water and more gluten, either in the form of a strong white flour (like bread flour) or added vital wheat gluten. 

If the dense loaves began when you bought new yeast, is it perhaps active dry that you purchased when the recipe calls for instant?  To substitute Active Dry for Instant, increase the amount by 25%.  Even if you bought the same kind of yeast the recipe calls for, sometimes whole grain bread can require a little more yeast as well as the adjustments for water and gluten. 

To test if your yeast is bad or too old, you can proof it in warm water + sugar, see if it bubbles after 20 minutes.

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