Making the scone dough the night before
Posted: 21 June 2013 06:38 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’ve always made the dough for Rose’s currant scones the morning I bake them instead of the night before, because I’m worried that if I make the dough in advance and then bake them the next morning they may not rise as high since there is baking powder in the batter which reacts the moment it touches liquid. This time, however, I’d like to make the scone dough the night before, cut them into triangles, and then bake them the first thing in the morning. Has anyone tried this and had successful results?
And while we’re on the subject of making the dough in advance, has anyone tried making the dough, freezing it, and then baking it later in the future.

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Posted: 22 June 2013 10:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I am sorry I haven’t tried this but I have the same reservations regarding baking powder. Especially Rumford. You could certainly premix the dry ingredients the night before. Or if you don’t mind the taste a heat activated baking powder might work.

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Posted: 23 June 2013 03:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yup, I use Rumford, because it’s aluminum-free (and I have some qualms about ingesting aluminum). I usually premix the dry ingredients the night before and make the scones the first thing in the morning, but I have some early morning plans next weekend and would like to be able to just stick the scones in the oven as soon as I wake up.

But anyhow, now that we are on the subject of baking powder, I looked on the Clabber website.

http://www.clabbergirl.com/faq.php

Rumford is very fast-acting, because 70% of the reaction is with the liquid ingredients and the other 30% is when heat is applied (>140 deg F).  2/3 of the gas is released within 2 minutes of mixing with liquids.
Clabber, however, is 40% of the reaction with moisture, and 60% with heat. (But it does have aluminum.)

I actually have both powders at home, but mainly use Rumford. However, I’m wondering if people here have a preference or know which one would be better for the scone recipe. A lot of chefs like aluminum-free baking powder, because baking powder WITH aluminum can sometimes leave a metallic taste. However, it seems that a slower-acting baking powder such as Clabber would be better for the scone, since it makes sense to have the majority of the leavening to occur during baking instead during the preparation of the dough with all those turns and rolling-outs that will surely squeeze the gas out of the dough. For things like cake batters which are quickly and lightly mixed and then baked, the quick acting powder like Rumford makes more sense.

I will be willing to use Clabber maybe just this once if it means I can make the dough the night before and just bake it in the morning. I have used it a few times before and haven’t tasted anything metallic yet. Just wondering if anyone has tried prepping the scones the night before and then baking the next morning.

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Posted: 23 June 2013 04:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Now this is interesting and highly informative.

http://bowlofplenty.blogspot.com/2009/02/baking-powder_16.html

Fleischmann’s is 10% in the mixing and 90% in the baking—a very slow-acting baking powder and aluminum-free, but it seems to be available only to commercial bakers. Seems like this one would be the best for the scones and especially for making the dough ahead of time. Anyone know of other aluminum-free slow-acting baking powders?

Bob’s Red Mill Baking Powder has the same basic composition of Fleischmann (MCP and SAPP), but their website doesn’t report the proportion of gas released during mixing and baking. It may not be 10% mix and 90% bake like Fleischmann. Anyone had any experience with Bob’s Red Mill? But anyway, the smallest size is 1 lb, and that’s a little too big for me.

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Posted: 26 June 2013 06:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I don’t believe this…I have Fleishmann’s in my grocery store in (Saskatoon, SK Canada) and we NEVER have products that aren’t available elsewhere!!! We also have aluminum free Magic Baking Powder here which is sold by Kraft.  I’m not sure what the ratio of liquid:baking action this brand has.

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Posted: 29 June 2013 05:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Interesting! I haven’t seen Fleishmann’s around. Is that what you use, Sherrie? I’m from San Francisco, and you can usually find anything you can ever want here or at least somewhere in the Bay Area. I haven’t seen Fleishmann’s in even the most well-stocked grocery stores I know of.

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Posted: 29 June 2013 11:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I recently noticed it…I usually use Magic Baking Powder because it comes in a plastic screw top container—seems more airtight than others for storage once open smile

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