Currants are in season!
Posted: 02 September 2008 12:14 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I was so excited to make my first currant pie with currants that are in season yesterday evening. I let the pie to cool overnight and this morning cut him to find that the inside of the pie is basically like soup. The crust came out wonderful, but I have currant soup in a pie crust. I am completely perplexed as to why this happened. I even added a bit of ‘extra’ corn starch to the mixture as I have heard that currants came make a lot of juice.

Do you know what happened? I want to make another pie but the fresh currants are so expensive here that I am nervous to try again without getting some expert advice.

Thank you so much in advance!

Anne

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Posted: 02 September 2008 04:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Thanks for writing back! Absolutely, is the answer. Rose is definitely my heroine for bread, pastries and cakes and I always get great results.  That is why I am so completely perplexed as to why I got the soup.  Any advice you can offer would be appreciated.  The only thing that might be a contributing factor that I can come up with myself is that although I let the currants macerate for about 15 minutes, there was still a small bit of cornstarch/sugar that was not stuck to some of the currants. They were just not juicy at that point and the starch/sugar mixture didn’t stick to everything (about 85% did though).

thank you in advance for your help!

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Posted: 06 September 2008 01:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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A shot in the dark, here: doesn’t acid inhibit the thickening action of cornstarch? Currants are great at different stages of ripeness. Maybe you had more acidic berries than the recipe assumed.

This is just a guess. I can’t generally bring myself to cook currants since they’re so beautiful. I just sprinkle or pile them on things.

Cathy

By the way- are these red currants or black? I had assumed red, but just remembered that the season for red currants, here,anyway, is early July.

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Posted: 15 September 2008 08:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hi there. thank you so much for your response. I was out of town and just got back this evening.  They were red currants, yes.  I added a ton of starch though just because I was afraid that they would shoot off a lot of liquid. Any other thing you can think of that caused the problem?

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Posted: 17 September 2008 11:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Was there any hint of cloudiness to the filling, showing that some of the cornstarch hadn’t gotten hot enough to thicken?

Cathy

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Posted: 18 September 2008 10:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hi there and thank you so much for your reply.

That was my concern as well that all the cornstarch did not get absorbed, and perhaps that is the issue; it seems the most logical to me.

However, there was no cloudiness or clumps of starch lingering, it was pure D Soup! A pretty soup, but a soup in crust nonetheless.  There appeared to be a few parts of the fruit that were sticking together that were cloudy. Do you think that the cornstarch just thickened in a few places and the rest didn’t get any?

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Posted: 18 September 2008 07:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Well, I’m stumped. I’ve never known perfect mixing in to be necessary for a pie filling to thicken. If you’re brave enough to try this again, maybe you could mash a few of the berries to give a little moisture.

Cathy

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Posted: 18 September 2008 07:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Thanks a million Cathy. I was completely stumped myself. Usually if something completely screws up, I can pinpoint where I messed up. I guess we will just challk this up to a weird phenonemon and leave it at that.  Thanks for the suggestion on mashing it up a bit. If I do find more currants, I might let them macerate much longer as well.

Warmest wishes and happy baking!

Anne

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Posted: 11 July 2009 11:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Hi Matthew—appreciate your thoughts on the matter. Yes I was thoroughly perplexed but that may be right. I haven’t given it another go—my pie soup experience was very disheartening. Next time I do this particular pie I will make sure that it is bubbling fully. Warmest wishes Anne

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Posted: 14 July 2009 12:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Caspar et al.

Well that is something that definitely makes sense.  This has been a very ‘fruitful’ discussion for me and I definitely appreciate the ‘expert’ advice. I feel with everyone’s valued input here that I can brave the currant pie world again. Actually I am not disheartened any more but rather inspired to tame the currant berry acid! I look forward to learning more next time.

Warmest wishes to you all

Anne

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Posted: 16 August 2009 05:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Dear Friends

I wanted to give you the latest results of the currant pie baking experience! My husband surprised me with four pints of currants the other day and I tried another rose recipe (the currant and raspberry pie) and voila! No soup, only Pure-D pie! I really enjoyed eating this pie, mostly because there has been a lot of discussion and support getting this pie right!

Hooray for me and hooray to all of you for your expert advice!

here, have a slice on me:

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