Sourdough flavor without starter?
Posted: 11 September 2008 01:03 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello smile

.............I have been interested in making a sourdough biscuit. I have a yeasty buttermilk biscuit dough that with a few tweaks and a little extra time might taste like sourdough. It is already refrigerated for 8hrs or overnight for the original recipe. when I leave it in the refrigerator longer than 48 hours, the flavor starts to change. It still bakes well, and tastes good if I do that, but I rarely make the dough more than 12 hours or so ahead of time.
.............I am planning to try this out friday night, in starting this dough for sunday.

Here is my plan so far:
1. start it friday morning to allow extra time for flavor development.
2. using active dry yeast, give it a little extra proofing before adding to dough
3. possibly add instant yeast directly to dry ingredients, in addition to my active dry proofed yeast and making my dough a little moister, to make sure there is enough to promote the growth of the extra yeast and the bacteria that will -hopefully- give me the flavor I want
4. allow 3hrs before baking for final rise - a step I used to do but omit for time purposes, since my regular dough is great without it. I would do it here if it helped out the final flavor after 48hours refrigerated.


reading about sourdough starters, and considering my “living dough”, I want to see how this works, within 4 batches or so.

Any Suggestions? I’ll update after this weekend’s experiment.
Can I call it sourdough if I get the flavor right without using a starter?

p.s.
would someone catch me up on what ‘oven spring’ refers to ?smile

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Posted: 20 September 2008 06:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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biscuits - 11 September 2008 04:03 AM

Hello smile
p.s.
would someone catch me up on what ‘oven spring’ refers to ?
smile

How did your sour dough biscuits turn out?

btw…When bread is first placed in a well-preheated and hot oven, the heat from it causes a final burst of fermentation and expansion called “oven spring”. This gives the bread a nice rounded and well-risen top. 
  Oven spring continues through the first five to ten minutes of baking and stops when the loaf has reached 140 degrees F when the yeast dies. The flour’s starches gelatinize and the gluten sets, making the loaf’s shape permanent. 

Tammy

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Posted: 17 January 2009 01:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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How did it go?
I know that some commercial bakeries use packaged yeast to give their sourdough timing a little boost. It shortens the time it takes to make the sourdough starter by a few days. However, most sourdough purists claim it doesn’t taste quite as flavourful.

To be honest, my advice would be to give a wild yeast starter a try. That way, you’ll have something to compare this current trial too.
I’ve made one, and it works amazingly well. Yes, it takes a few days before you can start using it, but I think the results are well worth it. Besides, it only takes a few minutes each day to refresh it. Once it’s made, you can ignore it for quite a while, as long as you refresh it every now and then.

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Posted: 23 July 2009 10:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thank you both for the replies!

.........I tried it my way, with mixed results. it took on some of a sour- type flavor, but it had a strange after taste. I think that I’ll actually take rose’s advice and ask a local baker for some of their sourdough starter. A sourdough version of my biscuits would be great.

.........I have found out that you can’t rush great flavor sometimes, so if you want it great-take the time.


P.S….......This reminds me of when I wanted to do a spiced carrot raisin biscuit by folding in the spice-carrot-raisin mixture with my dough just before baking. (I was looking for a easy way to turn a a double batch of proofed dough into four samples.) It tasted good but paled in comparison to when I incorporated these into my dough with some extra spice and gave everything its 8 hours in the fridge. The flavor was so rich it made a relative of mine ask me “how did you make something this good?”
.............So I just make smaller separate batches to ensure maximum flavor. the extra work at the beginning of making the bread makes it worthwhile when people can taste how much you care.

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