Topsy Turvy Cake Questions…
Posted: 18 September 2008 04:06 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I baked the chocolate cake recipe & made the chocolate buttercream recipe this last Monday afternoon.

I carved the 3 pieces of cake that will be the crazy tier.

I iced the 3 pieces, wrapped them tightly in saran wrap & refridgerated them.

I took the 1st & biggest round this afternoon (Thursday) & placed the fondant on it. It looks good.
It’s sweating a little… should I be nervous?

Do I wrap it in saran wrap & place on the counter until I can get to the second medium sized round?
I should not refridgerate it anymore at this point correct?

Will this cake stay moist encased in the fondant until Sunday afternoon?
I have to make it far in advance because I’m getting away from my kooky kids : ) & going on a retreat tomorrow night & will not return until very late Saturday night, thus, this is my only time.

I baked it far in advance because I had another cake to do in between.

Anyhow, I want to make sure I’m storing this correctly & I’m not compromising the cake.

Thank you in advance!

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Posted: 18 September 2008 09:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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First a few questions.

How tall it is on the tallest side and how short on the shortest side?  How many tiers are you doing?  How did you build this (a 9” bottom with a 10” top?)

How many tiers is this going to be (two? three? or just the one?)

I think for starters you should either box or bag the cake and then refrigerate it.  It will sweat when you take it out of the fridge (not as much if you are using an home fridge and not a commercial unit) but it will be infinitely safer that way, and less likely to collapse or cause problems.  If you are not stacking this cake, it’s not as much a concern, but I would still refrigerate it because you’re not serving it until Sunday and that’s a little long at rm temp and you are taking your chances IMHO.

The caterers I share with got a three tier topsy turvy wedding cake (not from me, but from an established bakery) delivered to an “outdoor” facility at noon on a Saturday afternoon.  The weather was not hot, the cake stayed in the house; it was buttercream not fondant.  By the time 6 pm rolled around the cake was falling apart - as in the tall side of the top tier had fallen away due to weight and sagging.  One of the cooks took a picture and is contemplating sending it in to CakeWrecks.com   Don’t let that happen to you!

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Posted: 19 September 2008 12:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I’m doing 3 tiers. A 10”, a 6” & a 4”.
I carved it & leveled inside where I fit into place the tiers. I also inserted 4 bbq skewers. It’s holding up rather well.

I have all the fondant on it now & it has been sitting on the counter in plastic wrap. When I finish it this evening I’ll wrap it tightly in wrap & in a box?????

It’s still moist & it’s sturdy.

I’m concerned about the fondant. It is drying. It is cracking in some places. Do I mist it? Do I leave it alone. How can I fix fondant already on the cake?

Thank you so much for replying Jeanne. Thank you!

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Posted: 19 September 2008 06:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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If you could put the cake in a box and then in a soft cooler bag or styrofoam with one or two packs of gel ice, it will remain at aprox 55 to 60oF which is far too warm for any condensation, and perfect temperature for buttercake and buttercream to remain solid!

Butter cakes remain moist and fresh, covered with fondant, for many days.  I do syrup my butter cakes when done ahead of time, as stated by TCB.

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Posted: 19 September 2008 09:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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It depends on how badly it is cracking.  It could just be that you used a lot of cornstarch and the surface of the fondant is dry.  Sometimes rubbing a little crisco can help - just enough to coat your finger lightly and swipe it across the dry area.  It will minimize the look of the cracking.  If it is really bad, you might want to consider how to decorate around it, add some dots or flowers or something in the worst spots.

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Posted: 22 September 2008 03:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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so, what happened?

jen

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