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Mango Passion Tart
Posted: 07 October 2008 02:04 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi All!

I am in a Gourmet Club with several of my friends and this weekend we are holding our next dinner.  We have a Caribbean theme and so I have decided to make the Mango Passion Tart as the dessert.  Last week I did a trial run and it was very VERY successful.  Everything tasted absolutely DELICIOUS, but my problem was with the slicing.  My mangoes were on the firmer side so once the first cut was made, the passion curd cream was pressed out of the sides :( For those of you that have made this before or that have mango experience, how do I get my mangoes to be slightly softer so that I still get a beautiful slice of this absolutely phenomenal dessert? I’m sure it is all about the ripeness, but after that I’m lost.  Help!!

Thanks in advance to all you wonderful bakers out there!!

Matthew C.

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Posted: 07 October 2008 03:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Yes—it is just ripeness.  I’ve made mango roses a few times now—the more you do it, you learn how to pick the right mangoes.  Too hard and they won’t slice, too soft and they won’t make nice “petals.”  Of course, it also helps to have a good sharp nice for slicing the tart that isn’t too heavy or too dull.

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Posted: 07 October 2008 03:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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So when selecting mangoes at the store, should they be a little soft like an avocado? I’ve also heard that you should be able to smell mango from the stem end to test for ripeness…

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Posted: 07 October 2008 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Oops, I meant knife!  Yes, I would say just starting to get softer in places.  Of course, it also depends how much time at home you have for them to ripen.  But if they are uniformly firm all the way around, that is too hard.

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Posted: 07 October 2008 07:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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What I do is get my mangoes 1 week in advace, ripe but firm.  Leave them out until they soften (you can press it with your finger, just a bit, yes like avocado).  Now, put them in the fridge until ready to use.  It will keep in the fridge for up to 1 week, and soften just a tad more.

Mango tastes well, soft or hard, but must be ripe.

What I often do, is to slice very thinly if the mango is hard, and much thicker if the mango is too soft.  With practice you will decide how thick to slice to form the rose.  The rose in the mango passion tart can be done ahead of time and frozen, but be sure you use locally grown and tree ripened mangoes, the ones coming from far and shipped for weeks, do not freeze well (they turn dark when thawed).

You have probably heard that I have worked on the mango rose pattern for near a year, including an entire Rose World Cake where the continents were made of Mango Passion Tart.

The mango pattern is the way I serve mango now.  Was Matthew whose not long ago suggested I try the Mango Passion Tart.

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Posted: 07 October 2008 09:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Excellent! Thanks you guys.  I’m going to the store presently.  I’ll be sure to get some pictures of the finished product!!

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Posted: 08 October 2008 06:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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You might not want to go through the extra trouble, but one way around the cutting issue would be to make individual tartlets.

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Posted: 09 October 2008 03:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I know it isn’t always practical, but I always think that a slice of a full size pie or cake tastes much better than a tartlet or cupcake!  The proportion of crust ratio vs filling, flakiness, amount of crumb or cake crusts, tenderness, the way it plates and how you can get a bite with a fork, even the cutting moment, I enjoy most when coming from te big deal.

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Posted: 07 November 2008 12:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Hi Hector, Matthew, and the other Mango Passion Tart experts,

I have a question on slicing the mangoes - currently waiting to ripen and soften to perfection for my cousin’s birthday on Sunday - do you slice horizontally straight across the top of the mango (ie. parallel with the seed) and then cut each slice in half along the middle of its length?  Just checking because it’s not quite clear…

Second question (for the future, since I already have my tart pastry in the refrigerator waiting to be baked tomorrow) - do you use a 10 x 1” tart pan or a 10 x 2” tart pan or does it not matter?  I’m just wondering about the final height of the crust.  Incidentally for Sunday’s tart I have a 9 x 1.5-2” tart pan with a removable bottom, because I could not find a 10” tart pan.  So I expect the finished product to be a little higher.

Third question - do you think it would be okay to stir the gelatin mixture into the passionfruit puree and then the puree into the whipped cream, rather than whipping the gelatin straight into the whipped cream?  The last couple of times I tried to make super-stabilised whipped cream, I had unsightly gelatin lumps in the cream - due, I know, to the gelatin not being warm enough when added to the cream - but I can’t seem to avoid it particularly when the cream has to be really cold.  Guess I’m doing something wrong there.

Ta in advance!

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Posted: 07 November 2008 02:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Hello LIttleIsland, I can only answer for how to cut the mangoes, as regarding the tart size pan and how/when to add the gelatin I follow EXACTLY the Pie and Pastry Bible.

This is how I cut my mangoes, and Rose method is indeed different.  First I take the 2 big slices as big as possible by standing the mango on its stem and making one straight cut down as close as possible to each side of the flat part of the mango seed.  Then I turn the mango 90 degrees and take the 2 remaining much smaller slices.

Now I lay each slice on the cutting board, flat side down, and cut straight down every 3 to 5 mm to get the petals, lenghtwise, keeping the original 4 slices together.  Now, to each of these 4 slices, I turn 180 degrees half of the petals; I do this so each petal has the same top angle orientation.  Each petal is assembled into a rose with the pit side down and the skin side up and with the lower side of the angle facing outwards.  Hope this makes sense, it is the angle the most important in my opinion because if you have a shuffle of angles (some petals reversed) then the rose just looks odd.

Good luck, it is a fun rose to make, and at the beginning of the assembly is rather unruly and seems that it won’t put together, but as you lay more petals, it tames down.

I start making the rose from the center out, so you know.  Rose does reverse.

Did you see the mango roses we made for Elaines 7-Cake Wedding?  She requested a fresh mango fruit platter, well, it has become my trademark to serve mango as roses.

Keep us posted… Hector of Roses.

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Posted: 08 November 2008 09:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Thanks so much Hector!  Not quite sure I get it, but can only try tomorrow and see what happens.  Will report back.

In the meantime - my crust cracked.  I had made the dough two days ago, refrigerated for 2 nights and a day and baked it this morning.  Luckily the crack didn’t go right across the base - just a bit on the base and up one side.  Hope it holds up when we slice it!  If anyone has any feedback on cracking crusts, I’d be most grateful!

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Posted: 08 November 2008 12:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I guess I will need to take some photos step by step on how to slice mango rose… I will

my pie crusts crack when the dough, specially the butter, hasn’t been equally distributed.  you should see small flakes of butter, but not chunks.  stretching the dough when lining your pan is also a factor, never pull/stretch, instead tuck it in and pinch it together.

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Posted: 09 November 2008 01:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Here’s the tart!  I am looking forward to tasting it this evening - I hope it lives up to my admittedly high expectations since everyone has given it rave reviews… so I know any shortfalls are my own. 

Thanks so much, Hector, for the tips on slicing the mangoes.  I used a combination of your technique (I think!! haha, can’t be sure) and Rose’s.  I sliced the mango halves off the pit first, then sliced the petals on the cutting board.  I didn’t turn half the slices the other way, but I did try to make sure the “angle” (I finally figured out what you meant when I started doing it) was the same for each slice - although I couldn’t always remember which way I’d turned it.  Oh well - hopefully it can’t be seen. 

I assembled the rose from the outside in as I thought that would be the easiest way.  It wasn’t too difficult but had to adjust a little towards the end because the rose ended up off centre!!  And had to fill in some gaps between petals, with the smaller pieces.

Next time, I will know also to ensure my parchment with the baking weights is folded over the edge of the tart because the edge browned during the initial baking with the weights, and even further to a VERY dark brown (you can see this in the picture) when I had removed the weights for the final browning of the rest of the crust.  And, I must follow Hector’s advice about not stretching the crust too much - I might have, at the point of transferring it into the pan because I couldn’t get it centred properly.  I did do a lot of patch up work using ALL the remaining scraps.

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Posted: 09 November 2008 03:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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dear, it looks stunning!  as all roses on this world!

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Posted: 09 November 2008 11:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Thank you Hector!  Praise from you is high praise indeed grin  Second only to Rose of course.

I thought it tasted great and so did everyone else - the flavour was unusual for them, and the only drawback was that it was a bit sweet for everyone’s tastes, including my own.  I always thought I’d love passionfruit curd in a tart as I’m wild about the stuff, but even when “diluted” as a curd cream in the tart, it was a wee bit intense - perhaps the combo with the mango, sponge and crust, all of which had touches of sugar.  The mangoes were very sweet ones.  When I tasted the curd cream on its own I had thought it was ok.

I don’t think I can reduce the sugar in the curd by too much - that would make for a rather too-tart curd although I do prefer my passionfruit curd on the tartish side - perhaps might have to add a bit more cream and also omit the sugar from it .  My crust was overdone, a bit hard in places, so I did see folks leaving the crust sides on the plate.

I used a total of 2 and a half large-ish mangoes for the top - and that was a 9/9.5 inch tart pan.  So if anyone else is making this for the first time, do plan for extra mangoes - I was certain the one and a half specified in the recipe would not be sufficient so I bought 4.  Another mistake to avoid in future - brushing HOT apricot glaze onto the mangoes.  By evening and serving time the mangoes had turned translucent so it was not the most attractive although I don’t think anyone else noticed.

Any other suggestions on how to cut out the sweetness from the apricot glaze - is there a non-sweet glaze that I can use for both the pie crust as well as the mangoes?

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Posted: 09 November 2008 01:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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oops, so sorry for been so sweet.  I never thought so and Rose’s cakes are actually on the not so sweet side.

passion fruit juice is very tart, almost like lemon juice.  what type of passion fruit juice did you use?  I use 100 percent juice/pulp fom the fresh fruit.

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