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Syruping and Freezing Butter Cakes, and dealing with crusts - How to?
Posted: 29 March 2009 03:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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I teach pastry classes, etc. and we don’t recommend syruping a cake until just before it is used.  Also, we don’t trim anything until then either.  Hope this assists.

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Posted: 03 May 2009 03:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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Hi - thanks Micromaster! This topic has a few postings that usually are related to syruping and freezing. I had attempted to find the answer that you gave. I am a out to attack my first genoise, chocolate with strawberry cloud cream. I had intended to make the cake two days ahead. I thought maybe I should torte it and syrup it, wrap it and let the syrup penetrate before I frosted it two days later. I couldn’t find the answer. I think what you are saying is to just bake it, hold it, and then syrup and frost at the same time? Then let it set over night or so before serving if I choose? There have been several queries about syruping. Hector likes to syrup every cake, others Rozanne, Jen, Patrincia have different procedures as well. Does anyone else have something more to add? I guess at this point, my first genoise, I should be more concerned with the temperature of the eggs ; ) Joan

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Posted: 03 May 2009 01:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Joan, for genoise, it is ideal to finish the cake (including frosting) a full day ahead of serving (store wrapped and refrigerated).  Gives the syrup time to fully permeate the cake and for the flavors to mellow.  Great for a make-ahead dessert.

You can freeze just the genoise layer, very well wrapped in several layers of plastic/foil, ahead of time, defrost prior to trimming the crusts, torting and syruping.  Syrup is optional for butter cakes, but it is required for genoise, or the cake will be dry and tough.  Are you using a Cake Bible genoise recipe?  They have the perfect amount of syrup, don’t be afraid of using the full amount specified. 

Temp of the eggs should not exceed 110F for beating.  When folding, I like to make one or two passes with a spatula to pick up any heavy stuff off the bottom of the bowl (butter, chocolate). 

Good Luck, it is an amazing cake!

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Posted: 06 May 2009 01:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Hi Julie - Thanks for your message on the 3rd. I waited to respond until I had made the cake. I just posted the ‘story’of that under genoise—heavy bottom thread: Mine is: “My first genoise—I tried so hard”.  In the midst of the production, however, I did hear you saying to make two passes with the large spatula to bring heavy chocolate through., and I did. I am sad that my first little genoise is only one inch tall oh oh  But we are learning from out mentors, even trials and tribulations. You know, I have been meaning to ask: If I am planning to use a whipped cream frosting like strawberry cloud, and the directions say to keep ithe completed cake wrapped in plastic, how is that possible without half the frosting ending up on the saran wrap? Or am I being obtuse and missing something. Perhaps I am meant to allow it to chill so that it is not fluffy and sticky? Thanks for always being there!  joan

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