Waffles and Overmixing
Posted: 28 October 2008 11:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
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In the Cake Bible, Rose has a recipe for yeast waffles from Marion Cunningham.  The recipe says to mix the ingredients thoroughly until there are no lumps left.  This is in contrast to the other Buttermilk waffle recipe she has where she warns of overmixing and to leave the lumps.  Why is it ok to thoroughly mix the yeast waffles?

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Posted: 29 October 2008 10:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I think you avoid overmixing in the buttermilk recipe because they are cooked immediately.  The yeast waffles, however, are allowed to rest for a period.  Two things will happen—the gluten will develop naturally just by being hydrated and sitting for several hours—so you can’t avoid developing gluten by undermixing, but the gluten will also relax somewhat over the long rest.  I haven’t tried this recipe, but my guess would be that although they may be light as Rose describes, they will also have more “bite” to them because of the gluten development.  I have found that to be true of yeasted biscuits versus regular “quick” biscuits.

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Posted: 29 October 2008 01:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Matthew - 29 October 2008 01:54 PM

The yeast waffles, however, are allowed to rest for a period.

That makes some sense, thank you.

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Posted: 02 November 2008 01:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Matthew - 29 October 2008 01:54 PM

I think you avoid overmixing in the buttermilk recipe because they are cooked immediately.  The yeast waffles, however, are allowed to rest for a period.  Two things will happen—the gluten will develop naturally just by being hydrated and sitting for several hours—so you can’t avoid developing gluten by undermixing, but the gluten will also relax somewhat over the long rest.  I haven’t tried this recipe, but my guess would be that although they may be light as Rose describes, they will also have more “bite” to them because of the gluten development.  I have found that to be true of yeasted biscuits versus regular “quick” biscuits.

Could the fact that the batter is very, very liquid also have something to do with it?

I made these last night/this morning and wasn’t very impressed.  The odor of yeast is strong in the baked product, but otherwise, there wasn’t much flavor.  I’ve had more “ethereal” waffles when I beat the egg whites separately.  So far, the best I’ve had came from James McNair’s breakfast book; they were so light and crispy I had to eat about 3 of them.  They used *lots* of butter.  I bet Rose’s Buttermilk waffles would be even better if I separated the eggs.

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Posted: 15 December 2012 05:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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CharlesT - 02 November 2008 05:23 PM
Matthew - 29 October 2008 01:54 PM

I think you avoid overmixing in the buttermilk recipe because they are cooked immediately.  The yeast waffles, however, are allowed to rest for a period.  Two things will happen—the gluten will develop naturally just by being hydrated and sitting for several hours—so you can’t avoid developing gluten by undermixing, but the gluten will also relax somewhat over the long rest.  I haven’t tried this recipe, but my guess would be that although they may be light as Rose describes, they will also have more “bite” to them because of the gluten development.  I have found that to be true of yeasted biscuits versus regular “quick” biscuits.

Could the fact that the batter is very, very liquid also have something to do with it?

I made these last night/this morning and wasn’t very impressed.  The odor of yeast is strong in the baked product, but otherwise, there wasn’t much flavor.  I’ve had more “ethereal” waffles when I beat the egg whites separately.  So far, the best I’ve had came from James McNair’s breakfast book; they were so light and crispy I had to eat about 3 of them.  They used *lots* of butter.  I bet Rose’s Buttermilk waffles would be even better if I separated the eggs.

I now this is a very old topic, but I just made the raised waffles this morning. Living close to Belgium and speaking the same language, I read all sorts of tradional recipes for Belgium waffles> I noticed that all the yeast recipes use the separately beaten egg whites, so I adapted that in the recipee. Left the other instructions and amount the same as in the CB. They came out very airy. But the taste of the yeast was far too much, almost to the point I had stomach problems. I saw the Belgium recipes containing much less yeast. And I missed the vanilla, which I added half way.

All the other recipes I made so far from CB en RHC are supreme, but this one can be tweaked I think.

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