Light Brown Sugar/ Raw sugar
Posted: 28 July 2013 01:06 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Can I susbtitute light brown sugar with the same weight of raw sugar?

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Posted: 28 July 2013 01:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Silvia - 28 July 2013 01:06 PM

Can I susbtitute light brown sugar with the same weight of raw sugar?

I would. I can’t guarantee that the percentage of molasses is exactly the same, but it would have to be greatly off to have a profound effect on the flavor, IMO.

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Posted: 28 July 2013 04:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Silvia - 28 July 2013 01:06 PM

Can I susbtitute light brown sugar with the same weight of raw sugar?

Silvia:
  Good afternoon. Silvia, I assume when you refer to “RAW SUGAR: do you mean Granulated sugar????

When you subst. brown sugar & depending of the quantity (You didn’t post the recipe) You may have to employ some amount of baking soda. I thought I should alert you to this.

  Feel free to post the recipe & what you are trying to do….Then we can help you more efficiently.

Good luck & enjoy the rest of the day young lady.


  ~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 28 July 2013 09:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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~FRESHKID - 28 July 2013 04:19 PM

I assume when you refer to “RAW SUGAR: do you mean Granulated sugar????

No, raw sugar is unrefined sugar.

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Posted: 28 July 2013 11:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Freshkid

According to http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2005/12/sugar.html,

“After harvesting, the plants are shredded and pressed to remove the juices. Insoluble matter is removed and water is added. This syrup is boiled in large steam evaporators. The substance that remains is crystallized in heated vacuum pans and the liquid, now called molasses, is separated from the crystals by spinning it in a centrifuge. At this stage the sugar is known as raw sugar and contains 3 percent impurities. The raw sugar crystals are washed with steam and are called turbinado sugar, which is 99 percent pure sucrose. Although turbinado closely resembles refined white sugar in sweetening ability and composition, it cannot always be substituted in recipes. Its moisture content varies considerably which, coupled with its molasses flavor and coarse granulation, can affect a recipe without careful adjustment.”

This very complete information doesn´t state clearly (al least, I didn’t understand it), if raw sugar can be a substite for light brwon sugar.,althoughiIt does explain that refined sugar cannot be substituted with turbinado sugar.

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Posted: 28 July 2013 11:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Silvia - 28 July 2013 11:14 PM

This very complete information doesn´t state clearly…if raw sugar can be a substitute for light brown sugar

Molasses is a by-product of sugar refining. Raw sugar simply has the molasses left in, whereas brown sugar is granulated sugar with the molasses added back. They are essentially the same thing.

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Posted: 29 July 2013 08:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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My two cents:  raw sugar contains 3% impurities, which are mostly molasses, and has a large, irregular granule size.  Light brown sugar has been refined to a pure white state, had its granules made smaller and more consistent, and then has molasses added back to it.  The raw sugar will have a more complex and tasty flavor, but will have a larger and less consistent crystal size and probably not be as consistent in molasses content as light brown sugar. 

From a baking standpoint, the two most significant differences between raw and light brown sugar are the granule size and molasses content.  You haven’t mentioned the recipe you are using.  If you are dissolving the sugar in a hot liquid, then granule size doesn’t matter.  If you are making a cake, you might want to blitz the raw sugar in a food processor to reduce granule size so that the cake’s crumb will have a fine texture. 

Re: molasses content, the raw sugar is likely to have less molasses, about 3% by weight.  If we use Rose’s weights for granulated white sugar (1 cup = 200g) and light brown sugar (1 cup = 217g), it appears that light brown sugar is about 8% molasses.  That means that if your recipe has baking soda in it, it may need to be reduced when subbing raw for light brown in order to avoid a soapy taste from too much baking soda.

To sum up, it depends on the recipe- in a custard you probably wouldn’t need to make changes for the substitution, but making a cake that called for baking soda might require grinding the raw sugar to reduce particle size and subbing baking powder for a little of the baking soda at a rate of 4:1.  Hope that helps! smile

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Posted: 29 July 2013 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Silvia - 28 July 2013 11:14 PM

Freshkid

According to http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2005/12/sugar.html,

“After harvesting, the plants are shredded and pressed to remove the juices. Insoluble matter is removed and water is added. This syrup is boiled in large steam evaporators. The substance that remains is crystallized in heated vacuum pans and the liquid, now called molasses, is separated from the crystals by spinning it in a centrifuge. At this stage the sugar is known as raw sugar and contains 3 percent impurities. The raw sugar crystals are washed with steam and are called turbinado sugar, which is 99 percent pure sucrose. Although turbinado closely resembles refined white sugar in sweetening ability and composition, it cannot always be substituted in recipes. Its moisture content varies considerably which, coupled with its molasses flavor and coarse granulation, can affect a recipe without careful adjustment.”

This very complete information doesn´t state clearly (al least, I didn’t understand it), if raw sugar can be a substite for light brwon sugar.,althoughiIt does explain that refined sugar cannot be substituted with turbinado sugar.

SILVIA,CHARLES T & JULIE:
  Good morning. Thank you for the dissentation about SUGAR in general. I happen to have some turbinado in my pantry but never
have had the occasion to use it in baking.

  I know that Miss Rose wrote a few pages all about sugar a few years back. I happen to have her dissentation on this subject. I have it printed somewhere & I think I may have it in my computer memory bank. If you are not aware of this infotmation about sugar look for it in her blog box.

  You all have a nice day my friends.


  ~FRESHKID.

  Anyway you all enjoy the rest of the day.

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Posted: 03 August 2013 12:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Thee recipe I want to try is TCB’s Chocolate Fudge CAKE

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