ceramics
Posted: 21 August 2013 08:17 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I was in the store the other day and they had this ceramic bakeware. Most of what I’ve used is pyrex and the standard type cookware. What’s the fuss? It seems like it’s like glass, which I have and like but I wanted to see what other’s response is about it. Is this the same as porcelain.
does it crack or tempermental like glass. It looks interesting but would like to hear the pros and cons.

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Posted: 21 August 2013 08:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Porcelain is one type of ceramic, amde with white clay, I believe.  What ceramic items did you see?  Were you looking at lasagna pans, or non-stick ceramic coatings on saucepans, or ceramic pie pans?

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Posted: 21 August 2013 09:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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It was pie pans, and they had some cake pans also. I think they also have ceramic for quiche and ramekins too don’t they? Im mostly curious overall as to its performance.

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Posted: 22 August 2013 08:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Ceramic bakes differently than metal or pyrex, slower to heat up but then hotter towards the end of the bake and then slower to cool down.  I have baked a number of pies in ceramic and they come out fine if you don’t mind a little softening of the crimped shape of the border.  Sometimes I start the oven a little higher and then reduce it after ten or fifteen minutes, but I haven’t really tested that thoroughly to tell you the best amount to increase the temp or the right amount of time to wait before turning it down. If you are blind baking pie crusts, and using weights, add 3-5 minutes to the bake time before removing the parchment and weights or they can stick.

In my opinion, the only reason to bake with ceramic is to have a nice look when serving something in the pan.  Since pies are served in their pan, I use ceramic, but I wouldn’t choose it for a cake or any baked good that isn’t served in the pan.  I like ceramic for casseroles because the slower cool down period means the food stays hot longer at the table.

The other consideration about ceramic pie pans is that they almost always are deep dish, and they can sort of look funny if you put a standard pie recipe in them.  I solve that by blind baking the crust and then adding fruit filling that has been cooked stovetop, topped by pastry cutouts instead of a top crust.  It can be a lot of changes and adaptations to deal with.

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Posted: 23 August 2013 06:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thank you Julie. I think you provided an answer to most of my question(s) about it. I thought it would be a stable conductor of the heat but I will definitely consider what type of pan I buy if I do decide to get it.

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Posted: 24 August 2013 08:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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You’re welcome smile

In that last post, talking about deep dish pies, I should have made clear that the fruit amount is increased to help fill up the deep dish pan. But I cook the fruit stovetop because it can be difficult to bake a deep dish pie long enough to cook all the fruit without overbaking the crust.

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