Failure for “Real Old-Fashioned Whipped Cream”
Posted: 23 August 2013 08:02 AM   [ Ignore ]
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The first time I made Rose’s Real Old-Fashioned Whipped Cream from The Cake Bible, it turned out perfectly.  The next time, however, was a disaster.  I knew the butterfat content the first time, but the supermarket changed brands meanwhile and the new brand doesn’t state butterfat content.  Since I thought it was probably lower, I went with Rose’s higher amount of butter.  I multiplied it by the number of cups of cream and proceeded the same way.  Almost immediately after adding the cooled butter-cream mixture, the content of the bowl became as thick as whipped butter, then separated into butter and a watery substance.  Nothing I did could bring them back together.  I had to run out to the store and get more cream.  The same situation appeared to be on the verge of happening, so I stopped and just used the whipped cream with a small amount of butter already added.  Any idea what could have happened?  I brought the butter mixture to room temperature and I added it very slowly to the cream mixture.

Thanks for any help,
Jim

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Posted: 23 August 2013 11:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Jim D. - 23 August 2013 08:02 AM

The first time I made Rose’s Real Old-Fashioned Whipped Cream from The Cake Bible, it turned out perfectly.  The next time, however, was a disaster.  I knew the butterfat content the first time, but the supermarket changed brands meanwhile and the new brand doesn’t state butterfat content.  Since I thought it was probably lower, I went with Rose’s higher amount of butter.  I multiplied it by the number of cups of cream and proceeded the same way.  Almost immediately after adding the cooled butter-cream mixture, the content of the bowl became as thick as whipped butter, then separated into butter and a watery substance.  Nothing I did could bring them back together.  I had to run out to the store and get more cream.  The same situation appeared to be on the verge of happening, so I stopped and just used the whipped cream with a small amount of butter already added.  Any idea what could have happened?  I brought the butter mixture to room temperature and I added it very slowly to the cream mixture.

Thanks for any help,
Jim

  JIM D:
    Good morning. I am sorry to learn of your recent disappointments. Generally Jim, I have never noticed a whipping cream carton stating the amount of butter~fat on it. My experience is that it will be “WHIPPING CREAM (30% to 34%) butterfat….it will whip~up.
    Or it will state “HEAVY WHIPPING CREAM (35% to 38%) butterfat.  Better yet for whipping.


    Jim, understand there are 2, types of prepared whipping cream’s from the creamery….“Ultra~ Pastuerized” which has a extended shelf life. The other is just pastuerized type which whips up easier & quicker & which is used by comm bakeries. I believe you must have used the ultra type.


  When you go to the supermarket see if you can buy the NON ultra…just “HEAVY WHIPPING CREAM”  I have had ultra type fail on me as well for a banana cream pie many years ago.

  Good luck Jim & enjoy the rest of the day.


  ~FRESHKID..

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Posted: 23 August 2013 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Jim D. - 23 August 2013 08:02 AM

I brought the butter mixture to room temperature and I added it very slowly to the cream mixture.

Sounds like your emulsion changed from an oil-in-water emulsion, which is cream, to a water-in-oil emulsion, which is butter, and not a very good emulsion at that. Milk solids are the emulsifier, so perhaps the new cream had a lesser quantity? You might try adding some lecithin to the mixture; not sure how that would affect the taste. Maybe a bit of powdered milk would help, too.

Or you may have just added the mixture in too fast.

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Posted: 24 August 2013 08:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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This is perplexing…  my first thought was that you may have added the cooled butter-cream mixture too late in the whipping process, so that the mixture very quickly showed signs of overbeating when the temperature warmed from adding the room-temp mix.  I would say try getting the butter-cream mixture as cool as possible (but still liquid), and then add it earlier in the whipping process.

My second thought was perhaps your new cream has emulsifiers in it that contributed to the problem, which sounds like Freshkid’s idea as well.  You can check the ingredients label for carageenan or some similar additive.  You might also check the fat content on the nutrition label to see if there is a difference between the two brands of cream, though often serving sizes are too small to be very accurate.

Third thought was along the lines of Charles’ thinking, which was that your new cream has a higher butterfat content than the old, so that when you add more butter, it actually starts to resemble a buttercream rather than whipped cream.  However, if that were the case I wonder if it would still curdle (separate) after the emulsion switched over?

Please report back if you find a fix smile

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Posted: 24 August 2013 06:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Julie - 24 August 2013 08:06 AM

Third thought was along the lines of Charles’ thinking, which was that your new cream has a higher butterfat content than the old

No, I was going after the milk solids. Since there exist such things as “double cream”, higher concentrations of butterfat don’t seem to be a problem.

My second thought was perhaps your new cream has emulsifiers in it that contributed to the problem, which sounds like Freshkid’s idea as well.

I think Freshkid thought the OP was just talking about a normal whipped cream failure and didn’t understand we were talking about Rose’s method of increasing butterfat content. Given that the emulsifiers are there to increase the ability to create the emulsion, is there any reason to think that they might have the opposite effect?

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